6 results in English
Charles Oakford's Hat and Cap Store, Wholesale and Retail. Number 104, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This print is an advertisement for the retail and wholesale hat store operated by Charles Oakford in Philadelphia. Oakford established his business in 1827, relocated to 104 Chestnut Street in 1843, where he began his wholesale trade in 1850, and operated from this address until 1852. The advertisement contains an exterior view of the store, surrounded by a decorative border comprised of hats and vignettes. The proprietor is seen standing behind the double-sided glass door of his establishment and displays of hats adorn the showcase windows of the store. The ...
Moyer & Hazard, Successors of Alexander Fullerton, 174 Market Street, Fifth Door Above Fifth Street, Philadelphia. Elijah Bowen, Wholesale & Retail Hat & Cap Store, 176 Market Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the adjacent businesses of wholesale druggists Charles Moyer and A. Fullerton Hazard (successors of Alexander Fullerton), and wholesale and retail hatter, Elijah Bowen. Both buildings are covered in signage. The "Alexander Fullerton drugs medicine & paints" signs on number 174 indicate the recent shift in ownership. A man stands in the left doorway of 174 directing a laborer who moves goods on ...
Garden and Brown, Silk and Fur Hat Manufactory. 196 Market Street, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1847 shows the hats and caps manufactory established by Christopher H. Garden & Brown located at 196 (later 532) Market Street, Philadelphia. On the ground floor is a retail shop selling “hats, caps, furs & trimmings.” The storefront is covered with signage and adorned with a large model hat marked with the street number "196." A patron enters one of the two open entryways of the business that are flanked by display cases of hats marked “Hats & Caps.” Garden established his hat manufactory in 1843 and partnered with ...
Grigg Block, North Fourth Street, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1848 shows the business block named after John Grigg and containing Grigg, Elliot, & Company, the largest and most prosperous publishing firm in Philadelphia at the time. The firm was founded by John Grigg in 1823 and purchased by J.B. Lippincott in 1849. The print shows the block of buildings (10−20 North Fourth Street) covered in signage and including Barcroft, Beaver & Company, dry good dealers, and S.M. Day, wholesale combs, brush and fancy goods trimmings (both at number 10). Next come Goff & Peterson, importers and manufacturers of saddlery and carriage and harness trimmings (number 12); Grigg, Elliot & Company (number 14); C.H. & George Abbott, dealers and importers of hardware and cutlery and C. Ahrenfeldt & Company, importers of toys and fancy goods (number 16); C.B. Lassell & Company, hats and caps, and Charles Wingate, dealer in shoes, boots, and palm-leaf hats (number 18); and Edwin & John Tams, importers and dealers of china, earthenware, and glass (number 20). Patrons exit and enter the various storefronts; delivery men haul, load, and remove goods from horse-drawn and push carts; laborers load goods into shop storage cellars and use a pulley to raise a large cask; store clerks inspect and open newly arrived packages on the sidewalk; a horse-drawn dust-settling machine passes in the street; and artisans and merchandise are visible in several of the shops' upper-floor ...
William H. Horstmann & Sons, Number 51, North Third Street, Philadelphia, Manufacturers and Importers of Military Goods
John Taylor French was born in Pennsylvania in 1822 and worked as a lithographer, particularly of fashion advertisements, in Philadelphia from about 1845 to 1852. This advertisement shows the ornately decorated storefront of William H. Horstmann & Sons clothing and military supply store. Patriotic bunting consisting of the names of J.H. Otten, carver, and J. Gibson, painter, and a shield surmounted by an eagle, flags, swords, and spears surround a sign that reads, "E Pluribus Unum, Horstmann," above the first level. Drums, military helmets, flags, and swords flank this central ...
Merchant's Hotel, Number 38, North Fourth Street, Philadelphia
This advertisement shows the front facade of the five-story hotel with balcony built in 1837 at 38 North Fourth Street in Philadelphia after the designs of William Strickland (1788–1854). The name of the proprietor, Sanderson, i.e., Joseph M. Sanderson, adorns the entranceway. Also shown is the hat shop of Lazel Elmes, a tenant in the building. A display of hats adorns the doorway to the shop. Merchant's Hotel was a premier early 19th-century hotel that was visited by several presidents and used as the presidential campaign headquarters ...