46 results in English
Snapshot from an Airplane: The Harbor of Copenhagen
This view of Copenhagen harbor is the earliest known Danish aerial photograph. The picture was taken by Holger Damgaard (1870–1945), the first full-time press photographer in Denmark. Damgaard worked for the Danish newspaper Politiken from 1908 until 1940, where he documented a wide variety of events, places, and persons. Aerial photography goes back to the 1850s, when the first photographs were taken from balloons. The first photograph taken from an airplane was made in 1909, when the American aviation pioneer Wilbur Wright flew over Rome, carrying a passenger who ...
View of the Port of La Luz and the City of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
This watercolor landscape, painted in about 1889, is by Eliseo Meifrèn y Roig (1859−1940), a Catalonian artist who specialized in impressionist marine seascapes. It represents a partial view of the Bay of La Isleta and Puerto de La Luz, near the northeast tip of the island of Gran Canaria, with the house of the maritime pilot and the English barges that supplied the coal trade. In the distance is the town of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, capital of the Spanish province of Las Palmas. The Puerto de La ...
Layout Plan for the Sheltered Port of La Luz and the Projected Works
This document is an original plan for the port of La Luz, situated in the Bay of Las Isletas in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain). It was drawn up by the engineer Juan de León y Castillo (1834-1912), whose idea was to construct an outer dock measuring 1,240 meters long, starting from an anterior pier providing shelter on a north-south axis. A transverse dock some 600 meters in length running in an east-west direction would complete the port seawall and separate the port from the outer ...
Saint Thomas Island, Danish Possession in the Antilles: View from the Brazilian Observatory with the Sandbank and the East Part of the Harbor and the City Charlotte Amalie
This photograph is contained in an album that commemorates the participation of Brazil in the international effort to track the transit of Venus in 1882. This involved the establishment by the Imperial Observatory of an observatory, named after Emperor Dom Pedro II (1825-91), on the island of Saint Thomas in the Danish West Indies (present-day U.S. Virgin Islands). The transit of Venus is a rare astronomical event that occurs when Venus passes between the Earth and the sun, becoming visible in daylight against the solar disk. The transits occur ...
Saint Thomas Island, Danish Possession in the Antilles: View from the Brazilian Observatory with the West Part of the Harbor and the City Charlotte Amalie
This photograph is contained in an album that commemorates the participation of Brazil in the international effort to track the transit of Venus in 1882. This involved the establishment by the Imperial Observatory of an observatory, named after Emperor Dom Pedro II (1825-91), on the island of Saint Thomas in the Danish West Indies (present-day U.S. Virgin Islands). The transit of Venus is a rare astronomical event that occurs when Venus passes between the Earth and the sun, becoming visible in daylight against the solar disk. The transits occur ...
Pier in the Town of Hankou, Hubei Province, China, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
The Harbor and Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts Algiers's harbor, which had been redesigned and greatly expanded by the French in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Port of Aden from the Sea
This 1894 photograph depicts Aden (in present-day Yemen) as viewed from the sea. The port city of Aden was occupied by the British in 1839 and became an important fueling depot for the British Navy. Situated at a strategically advantageous spot at the entrance to the Red Sea, Aden became a British Crown Colony in 1937 and remained under British control for another three decades. William Henry Jackson (1843-1942) took the photograph for the World’s Transportation Commission, a mission organized by U.S. railroad publicist Joseph Gladding Pangborn to ...
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Helsingborg, Sweden
This photochrome print is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a ship entering the harbor at Helsingborg, Sweden, which, between 1874 and 1896, was connected to Copenhagen by regular ferry service. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for ...
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Landing Place and Cathedral, Belgrade, Servia
This photochrome print of Belgrade as seen from the neighborhood of Kalemegdan is part of “Views of Belgrade, Serbia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. At the top of the hill is the Saborna Crkva (Cathedral church), the great Serbian Orthodox cathedral dedicated to St. Michael, built by Prince Miloš Obrenović in 1837-40. The waterway is the Sava River, which flows into the Danube River. The “landing space,” or the port of Sava, played a role in Belgrade's history since the Roman occupation in the 3rd century ...
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Fish Market, Bergen, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows the Bergen fish market as it looked in the last decade of the 19th century. According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers, “fish has always been the staple commodity of Bergen, which is the greatest fish-mart in Norway. The Hanseatic merchants compelled the northern fishermen to send their fish to Bergen, and to the present day the trade still flows mainly ...
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The Benefits from Knowing the Basics and Rules of Seafaring
This work is a collection of eight treatises related to the science of seafaring and navigation by Ibn Mājid al-Julfārī al-Sa‘dī, the most renowned Muslim navigator of the 15th century (9th century AH). It was originally assembled in 1490. The works are bound together in one large tome and include information about the Indian Ocean, the Red Sea, the Persian Gulf, the Arabian Sea, and other major bodies of water known to the author. The work meticulously lists and describes sea routes, harbors, and other points of interest to ...
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Fiume, the Harbor, Croatia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late 19th-century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly known as the Austro-Hungarian Empire) that was part of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the harbor in Fiume, as the present-day city of Rijeka, Croatia, was known at the time. The city, which dates to Roman times, was part of Austria-Hungary before World War I and was populated by both Croats and ethnic Italians. It became an object of contention in ...
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Arrival of Emigrants [i.e. Immigrants], Ellis Island
This film, by Gottfried Wilhelm "Billy" Bitzer of the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, was among the first films of this accomplished cameraman. It is reminiscent of contemporary films of Ellis Island shot by the Edison Manufacturing Company. It depicts scenes at the Immigration Depot and a nearby dock on Ellis Island. It appears to show, first, a group of immigrants lined up to board a vessel leaving the island, then another group arriving at the island and being directed off of the dock and into the depot by a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Damage from the Hurricane of 1906
The sixth hurricane of 1906 was one of 11 hurricanes or tropical cyclones that Atlantic hurricane season. The storm made landfall on September 27, 1906, west of Biloxi, Mississippi, but wreaked its greatest damage from Mobile, Alabama to Pensacola, Florida. The Category 4 hurricane was the most destructive storm to strike the Pensacola area in 170 years. Winds in excess of 105 miles (170 kilometers) per hour stretched past the city and port of Pensacola, and Escambia Bay in the Gulf of Mexico saw a storm surge as high as ...
Entrance to Port, Ostend, Belgium
This photochrome print of the port in Ostend is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in West Flanders on the coast of the North Sea, Ostend is one of Belgium’s main port cities. Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905) called Ostend “the second seaport and the most fashionable sea-bathing resort of Belgium.” Visible to the right is the Western Pier, which was built in 1837 to accommodate the city’s ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Foreigners' Ship: Steamship
Commodore Matthew C. Perry entered the port of Yokohama in 1853 with an intimidating fleet of steam warships, in order to compel Japan to open up after nearly two centuries of restricted foreign contact. The Japanese people became increasingly exposed to Western culture as new trade agreements prompted cross-cultural interaction. The mixture of anxiety, curiosity, and awe at this influx of unfamiliar technology and customs is reflected in the detailed depictions of foreign subjects by ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) artists. With the arrival of Perry, Yokohama-e (pictures of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
For the Return, Subscribe. 4th National Loan. Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie
This World War I poster, sponsored by the Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie, a financial institution serving Algeria and Tunisia, urges people to subscribe to the fourth national loan, issued by the French government in 1918. The poster shows a ship steaming into the beautiful harbor of Algiers, with Algerian women and children overlooking the harbor and as they await the return of their husbands, fathers, and brothers. The poster implies that victory in the war and the return of the men to Algeria will be hastened by ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cherepovets Harbor. Russian Empire
The Mariinsky Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. When this photograph was taken, in 1909, a primary component of the waterway was the Sheksna River, which drained White Lake at its southeast corner and flowed west to the Volga. The Sheksna and Volga merged near the town of Rybinsk. (The course of the Sheksna is now largely hidden by vast reservoirs.) Cherepovets, the main town on the Sheksna, was first settled in the 14th century at the site where the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Plan of English Harbour
This well-executed, colored British map is of English Harbour, Antigua, one of the principal port facilities for British activities in the Caribbean in the18th century. The map shows the coastline, coastal features, extensive soundings, a navigational hazard, fortifications, shipyards, cultivated fields and vegetation, and an ornate wind rose. It also includes a keyed legend. The map indicates that the primary purpose of the port was as a naval depot and dry dock. The map is from the Howe Collection at the Library of Congress, which was acquired in 1905 from ...
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Pressure from a Heavy Hand
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Large, Western-Style Wooden Building Atop Small Hill Overlooking Harbor, Samoa
This early-20th century photograph shows the governor's mansion on Togo Togo Ridge in Utulei, American Samoa, overlooking the harbor of Pago Pago. The mansion has served as the residence of all the governors of American Samoa, naval and civilian, from its construction in 1903 to the present. The photograph is by A.J. Tattersall, who wrote on its reverse side: “I warn anyone against using this copy without my permission. A.T., Photo, Samoa.” Tattersall was born in Auckland, New Zealand, in 1861, and was employed by photographic firms ...
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Emigrants [i.e. Immigrants] Landing at Ellis Island
Ellis Island was the gateway to American life for millions of immigrants from 1892 to 1954. This film, shot by prolific filmmaker, writer, producer, and director Alfred C. Abadie, was a production of Thomas A. Edison’s Edison Manufacturing Company. It was listed in a contemporary company catalog under the title “Emigrants Landing at Ellis Island” with the description: “Shows a large open barge loaded with people of every nationality, who have just arrived from Europe, disembarking at Ellis Island, N.Y.” The film opens with a view of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
From the Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Harbor from the Lighthouse, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Harbor by Moonlight, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Moonlight View, with Lighthouse, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Also seen in the image is one of the harbor’s lighthouses, built in 1544, on the site of an old Spanish castle and the fort of Peñón. According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the admiralty in the port of Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The original Spanish port was destroyed and rebuilt by Kheireddin Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546), a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French greatly expanded the port and occupied the neo-Moorish Palais de l’Amirauté (Admiralty Palace). As described by the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “one could traverse ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Harbor with Warships, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of warships in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In the early 1900s, the French navy was organized into seven marine districts: Cherbourg, Brest, Lorient, and Rochefort on the Atlantic; Toulon on the Mediterranean coast of France; Cochin-China in Asia; and Algeria on the North African coast. As the headquarters of the Algerian marine district, Algiers was an important strategic point. At the time, the French fleet ranked second in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Warships, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of warships in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In the early 1900s, the French navy was organized into seven marine districts: Cherbourg, Brest, Lorient, and Rochefort on the Atlantic; Toulon on the Mediterranean coast of France; Cochin-China in Asia; and Algeria on the North African coast. As the headquarters of the Algerian marine district, Algiers was an important strategic point. At the time, the French fleet ranked second in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Warship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a warship in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In the early 1900s, the French navy was organized into seven marine districts: Cherbourg, Brest, Lorient, and Rochefort on the Atlantic; Toulon on the Mediterranean coast of France; Cochin-China in Asia; and Algeria on the North African coast. As the headquarters of the Algerian marine district, Algiers was an important strategic point. At the time, the French fleet ranked second ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Disembarking from a Ship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers, and being helped into small boats for transfer to shore, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Passengers Disembarking, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers into a fleet of boats for transfer to shore is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to Algiers ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Steamship "Normannia", Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the steamship Normannia in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Constructed in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1890, the Normannia was one of four twin-propeller steamers belonging to the Hamburg-American Line that regularly crossed the Atlantic from Hamburg, Germany, and Southampton, England to New York. The ship displaced 8,374.26 metric tons and was 152.40 meters long and 17.53 meters wide. The Normannia was severely damaged in January ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Bona, Algeria
This photochrome print from Bona (present-day Annaba) in northeast Algeria is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The town was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as “the chief seaport of Algeria after Oran and Algiers and the most important outlet for the produce of the département of Constantine [present-day Qacentina], such as phosphates, iron, zinc, cork, cattle, and cereals.” Founded on or near the Roman site ...
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Philippeville, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Philippeville (present-day Skikda), Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The town was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers as “the youngest Algerian seaport.” It was founded by Marshal of France Comte Sylvain Charles Valée, to serve as a port for Constantine (present-day Qacentina) after French forces led by Valée conquered the city in 1837. The harbor became, along with ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kara-Keui (Galata) Bridge, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Galata Bridge spanning the Golden Horn on the western side of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the bridge, which links the Stambul and Galata districts of the city, was “originally built of timber in 1845, and called Sultan Valideh Bridge after its founder (the ‘sultan’s mother’), and was rebuilt in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kara-Keui (Galata) and View of Pera, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the neighborhood of Kara-Keui (Galata) in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) with a view of Pera is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). One theory, among others, is that the name Galata derives from the Italian term calata (descent), which would be fitting for the neighborhood of steep streets with many stairs sloping down to the Golden Horn. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers states that Pera ...
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View from the Bridge, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print showing a view of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) from the Galata Bridge is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The large building in the top left of the image is Hagia Sophia (Aya Sofya), originally a Greek Orthodox basilica, later an imperial mosque, and in modern times a museum. According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the Galata Bridge spanning the Golden Horn between the Stambul ...
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Stamboul, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The print shows the inner district of Stambul, as seen from across the Golden Horn. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described Stambul as “the chief seat of the Oriental merchants and the petty traders” in Constantinople, where “the old Oriental characteristics of the city still survive,” despite the ravages of “destructive fires (as in ...
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Yeni-Djama (i.e., Yeni Cami) by Moonlight, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Yeni Valide Camii (New Mosque of the Sultan’s Mother) in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The mosque adjoins the harbor on the southern bank of the Golden Horn by the Galata Bridge. It was begun in 1597 by Safiye, mother of Mehmed III, and finished in 1663 by order of Turhan Hatice, mother of Mehmed IV, placing it in a tradition of architectural commissions by Ottoman sultan ...
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The Golden Horn, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Golden Horn in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Chrysokeras, Greek for the Golden Horn, was the name for this inlet of the sea already in Byzantine times. The waterway is 800 meters across at its widest point and 7.24 kilometers long, forming one of the finest natural harbors in the world and joining the Bosporus just where it enters the Sea of Marmara. In Byzantine times, the ...
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