11 results in English
Map of the Alaskan Gold Fields
Beginning in the mid-19th century, gold was discovered in a succession of strikes along the western coast of the United States in an ascending arc from California to Alaska. The great California Gold Rush of 1849 was followed by many other “rushes” in succeeding decades, culminating in the Klondike Gold Rush of 1897 and the Nome Gold Rush of 1899, both in Alaska. This map was published in 1897, soon after gold was discovered in Bonanza Creek alongside the Klondike River, itself a tributary of the mighty Yukon River. The ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Gold Regions of California
The California Gold Rush of 1849 was a major event that sparked interest around the world and spurred the long-term rise and development of San Francisco and the surrounding region. Previously a Spanish and Mexican outpost, California witnessed a huge influx of prospectors and settlers after the gold strikes at Sutter’s Mill in early 1848. This map shows the entire area of California, including the Baja (present-day Mexico), and highlights in bright yellow the gold-producing regions along several rivers. The map also lists the names of various mountains, bays ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Good-Natured Map of Alaska Showing the Services Offered by the "The Alaska Line"
This map, published in 1934 for the tourist market with colorful images and motifs, shows various shipping routes of the Alaska Line, which had a near-monopoly at that time on maritime transportation in the region. It also shows key interconnecting routes such as the Alaska Railroad, White Pass and Yukon Railroad, and Richardson Highway. The Alaska Steamship Company, known informally as the Alaska Line, was formed in 1894 by a group of frontier businessmen. Initially intended to service the fishing industry and passenger traffic, by 1898 and the onset the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Topographical Sketch of the Gold & Quicksilver District of California
Published in July 1848 after the first gold strikes at Sutter’s Mill on the American River in northern California, this map shows the location of key gold and quicksilver (mercury, in the form of cinnabar) deposits in the territory of California. Soon after the find, prospectors began streaming into California in enormous numbers, and demand was high for geographic knowledge of the region, especially as it related to previous strikes. The map displays the basic topography of California by showing mountains, rivers, bays, and mountain passes, but its main ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Mining District of California
This map, produced in two parts in the early years after the California Gold Rush of 1849, shows the regions where gold was discovered in the territory. Accompanying the map was a 16-page appendix that gave further information on the location and significance of the gold strikes. The discovery of gold at Sutter’s Mill on the American River in January 1848 attracted migrants from the east coast of the United States, as well as from Europe, Central and South America, Australia, and Asia. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ending ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
S. John Del Rey Mining Company: Morro Velho
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. The São João Del Rei mine was a British-owned mine in the Brazilian gold mining province of Minas Gerais. The mine, established in 1834, dominated the economic, social, and ...
Amalgamation
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1868, photographer Augusto Riedel accompanied Luis Augusto, Duke of Saxe, son-in-law of Emperor Pedro II, on an expedition into the interior of Brazil. During a visit to the ...
The Gentleman Digger: Being Studies and Pictures of Life in Johannesburg
The Gentleman Digger is a fictional work set in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1889. Following the discovery of gold in the 1880s, Johannesburg became a boomtown that attracted miners and prospectors from all over the world. The book depicts the rapid growth of the city and the squalor, glitter, drunkenness, and crime that characterized the early mining camps. The book’s author, the Comtesse de Brémont (1864–1922), was born Anna Dunphy to Irish parents in Cincinnati, Ohio. At the age of 17, she married the Comte de Brémont, a ...
Gold Washing in the Río Guadalupe, Province of Medellín
This watercolor shows women panning for gold in the Guadalupe River, north of the city of Medellín, province of Medellín (present-day Antioquia Department), Colombia. The extraction of gold was one of the main economic activities in this area. The illustration is by Henry Price (1819–63), a British painter and musician who was one of the draftsmen of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission), a body tasked with studying the geography, natural resources, natural history, regional culture, and agriculture of the Republic of New Granada (present-day Colombia and Panama). Price was ...
A Gold-Washing Technique, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows people panning for gold along a riverbank in what was then Barbacoas Province, in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador. Behind them, two men are fishing. In 1853, when the picture was painted, Barbacoas Province stretched from the Pacific lowlands up to the mountains of the Cordillera Occidental. It was the center of an extensive gold- and platinum-mining industry that flourished from the mid-17th century. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity ...
Growls from Uganda
Growls from Uganda is a book of reflections on various aspects of modern life written by an unidentified Englishman living in Uganda in the early part of the 20th century. The author’s pseudonym, Critolaos, is taken from a relatively obscure ancient Greek philosopher who was a member of the school of Skeptics. The first chapter, entitled “Civilisation from a Distance,” describes the experience of the author living in a Baganda grass hut, built to his own specification and fashion. Successive chapters deal with what the author sees, from his ...