11 results in English
Germany and Its Colonies: Travels through the Empire and Its Overseas Possessions, with the Collaboration of Arthur Achleitner, Johannes Biernatzki, et al.
This 538-page work with its 1,367 illustrations reflects German national pride in the early 20th century, a period of rapid economic growth and scientific and cultural achievement in the German Empire. Most of the book deals with Germany proper, which at that time included Alsace-Lorraine, conquered from France in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. A concluding chapter is devoted to Germany’s overseas empire, which had grown rapidly since the achievement of national unity in 1871. Germany’s colonies included Togo, Cameroon, German South-West Africa (present-day Namibia), German East ...
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German East Africa as a Settlement Region for Europeans, Taking into Consideration British East Africa and Nyassaland
As imperial Germany began creating an overseas empire in the late 19th century, many influential Germans sought to emulate the example of Great Britain, which had built its large and powerful empire in part by promoting the settlement of immigrants from the British Isles to British-controlled territories in other parts of the world, including East Africa and South Africa. Germany declared a protectorate in East Africa in 1885 and established the colony of German East Africa (present-day Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi) in 1891. In 1908, Friedrich von Lindequist, undersecretary in ...
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The Tanganyika Territory (Formerly German East Africa), Characteristics and Potentialities
When war broke out in Europe in 1914, the fighting quickly extended to the colonial possessions of the European powers. In 1916 British forces operating from South Africa set out to conquer German East Africa (present-day Tanzania, Burundi, and Rwanda). They were assisted by Belgian and Congolese troops operating from the Belgian Congo. The allies never subdued the German army led by Colonel (later General) Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck, but they captured the German rail line and occupied much of the territory of German East Africa. At the conclusion of ...
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British Kaffraria and its German Settlements
In May 1910, the Verein für Sozialpolitik (Association for Social Policy), an influential organization of German economists based in Berlin, decided to commission a series of studies on the colonization and settlement of tropical regions by Europeans, with the goal of determining whether and under what conditions such colonization was economically and socially sustainable. The studies were to assist in the development of the German overseas empire, and German East Africa in particular. Each study was to include an overview of a particular region of settlement; analyses of its economy ...
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The German Colonists in the Brazilian State of Espirito Santo
In May 1910, the Verein für Sozialpolitik (Association for Social Policy), an influential organization of German economists based in Berlin, decided to commission a series of studies on the colonization and settlement of tropical regions by Europeans, with the goal of determining whether and under what conditions such colonization was economically and socially sustainable. The studies were to assist in the development of the German overseas empire, and German East Africa in particular. Each study was to include an overview of a particular region of settlement; analyses of its economy ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kusae, on the Basis of British and German Nautical Charts / by E. Sarfert
This map of the volcanic island of Kosrae in the western Pacific is by Ernst Gotthilf Sarfert, a German ethnographer who participated in the German South Sea Expedition of 1908–10 and spent four months on Kosrae in 1909, studying the island and its people. Kosrae comprises one of the four states of the Federated States of Micronesia, the others being Pohnpei, also a single volcanic island; Truk, a group of 14 volcanic islands; and Yap, a group of four islands and 13 coral atolls. These islands are all part ...
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Mandate for Nauru
Nauru is an island country located in the central Pacific that has been inhabited for thousands of years by people of Micronesian and Polynesian origin. In 1888, Imperial Germany took over the island. At the end of World War I, the Treaty of Versailles stripped Germany of its colonies. The League of Nations, established by the treaty, conferred a mandate on Great Britain to administer the territory under a trusteeship. Australia, whose troops had occupied the island in 1914, took control of the island, with Britain and New Zealand acting ...
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Cameroon and the German Lake Chad Railway
In 1884 the explorer Gustav Nachtigal signed a treaty with the chiefs of Duala on behalf of Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany in which, in return for trade advantages, the chiefs accepted the establishment of a German protectorate. In 1885, the new German colony of Kamerun came into being. A number of influential Germans determined that the colony’s economic potential could be realized only through the construction of a railroad. They established a Cameroon railroad syndicate in 1900, which in 1902 obtained a concession from the German government to ...
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German South-West Africa
German South-West Africa, or present-day Namibia, was a colony of the German Empire from 1884 until 1915, when it was occupied by South African forces fighting on the side of Great Britain in World War I. The brief history of the colony was marked by a series of insurrections by the Khoekhoe and Hereros against German rule, insurrections that the authorities suppressed with extraordinary harshness. The German ambition was to populate the colony with large numbers of settlers from Germany, much as the British had done in other parts of ...
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Togo under the German Flag
Germany, a latecomer to the competition among the European powers for colonies in Africa, established the Togoland Protectorate in 1884. Encompassing the territory of present-day Togo and the Volta Region District of Ghana in western Africa, Togo was portrayed by German imperial circles as a model colony, financially self-sufficient and benefiting from bridges, roads, and railroads built to support an agricultural industry based on cacao, coffee, and cotton exports. Later historians disputed this characterization, noting the often harsh treatment of the Togolese under German rule. The German authorities used scientific ...
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German Colonization
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. German Colonization is Number 42 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Section one of the book discusses the antecedents to modern German colonization, including the history of German migrations in ...
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