10 results in English
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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The Mailo System in Buganda: A Preliminary Case Study in African Land Tenure
The basic unit of the mailo system is a square mile, hence the derivation of mailo, which is also equivalent to 640 acres. The term is used in Uganda to describe a land tenure system that came into effect when the kingdom of Buganda signed an agreement with the British-administered Uganda Protectorate there in 1900. Buganda runs along the northwest shore of Lake Victoria, in present-day south-central Uganda. This work is by Henry W. West, who was assistant commissioner for lands and surveys in the early 1960s and the foremost ...
Uganda in Transformation: 1876–1926
Herbert Gresford Jones (1870–1958) was an Anglican cleric and missionary to Uganda. He studied at Cambridge University and was ordained in 1895. After serving as a vicar at churches in England and as a chaplain with the British forces in World War I, he went to Uganda in 1920, where he was bishop suffragan of Kampala until 1923. Uganda in Transformation: 1876–1926 is Jones’s account of the development of the Anglican Church in Uganda since the arrival of the first British missionaries in 1877. In a series ...
Uganda by Pen and Camera
Charles William Hattersley (1866–1934) was a British missionary who joined the Church Missionary Society in early 1897 after having managed a cutlery works in Sheffield. In September of that year he left England for Uganda, where he helped to set up the system of primary education, was involved in educating the sons of Ugandan chiefs, and eventually served as headmaster of the Church Missionary Society school on Mengo Hill in Kampala. An enthusiastic amateur photographer, Hattersley became the official photographer to the Ugandan court and the church. His Uganda ...
Uganda's White Man of Work: A Story of Alexander M. Mackay
Uganda's White Man of Work: A Story of Alexander M. Mackay is a children’s biography of Alexander Murdoch Mackay (1849–90), a pioneering missionary to Uganda. In 1876 Mackay answered a call of the Church Missionary Society to go to Uganda after King Mutesa I of Buganda told the explorer Henry Morton Stanley of his interest in receiving Christian missionaries. Mackay spent nearly 14 years in Uganda. In addition to teaching the Christian gospel, he worked as a farmer, carpenter, bridge and road builder, schoolmaster, printer, and translator ...
The Buganda Agreement, 1955
By the late 19th century, Buganda was a powerful East African kingdom, running along the northwest shore of Lake Victoria, in present-day south-central Uganda.  The Buganda Agreement of 1900, which gave Buganda a large degree of internal autonomy within the British-ruled Uganda Protectorate, was modified by this 1955 treaty. The Buganda Agreement, 1955 was made on October 18 of that year, between Sir Andrew Cohen, Governor and Commander in Chief of the Uganda Protectorate, on behalf of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and ...
The Story of the Life of Mackay of Uganda Told for Boys
The Story of the Life of Mackay of Uganda Told for Boys is a biography of Alexander Murdoch Mackay (1849–90), a pioneering Scottish missionary to Uganda. Written by Mackay’s sister, Alexina Mackay Harrison, and published in London in 1892, the book was intended to inspire boys to follow Mackay’s example and devote their lives to service in Africa. It begins with a brief account of the early European explorers of Africa: Mungo Park, who in 1796 ventured up the River Niger; James Bruce, who in 1770 traced ...
Growls from Uganda
Growls from Uganda is a book of reflections on various aspects of modern life written by an unidentified Englishman living in Uganda in the early part of the 20th century. The author’s pseudonym, Critolaos, is taken from a relatively obscure ancient Greek philosopher who was a member of the school of Skeptics. The first chapter, entitled “Civilisation from a Distance,” describes the experience of the author living in a Baganda grass hut, built to his own specification and fashion. Successive chapters deal with what the author sees, from his ...
Uganda and Its Peoples; Notes on the Protectorate of Uganda, Especially the Anthropology and Ethnology of Its Indigenous Races
Uganda and Its Peoples is a detailed survey of the native peoples of the Uganda Protectorate, as understood by early 20th-century ethnography and anthropology. The book is organized in nine chapters, each of which is devoted to one of the main ethnic and tribal groups: Bahima, Banyoro, Batoro, Banabuddu, Sese Islanders, Bakoki, Basoga, Bavuma, and Baganda. Topics covered include marriage ceremonies, birth ceremonies, diet, death ceremonies, beliefs and superstitions, history, law, systems of weights and measures, folklore, customs and traditions, and economic activities. Included are portraits of the kings of ...
East Africa and Uganda, or, Our Last Land
John Cathcart Wason (1848–1921) was a Scottish-born farmer and politician who as a young man immigrated to New Zealand, where he acquired large landholdings and was elected to the national parliament. In 1900 he sold his New Zealand estate and returned to Scotland, where he was elected to the British parliament. Wason took an interest in colonial affairs and was particularly concerned about what he saw as the British government’s mismanagement of British East Africa and the Uganda Protectorate, which he regarded as the last territories in the ...