16 results in English
Château de Saint-Cloud; Western Side
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Main View of the Hôtel Thiers
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
View in the Kungsparken, Malmo, Sweden
This photochrome print of the popular Kungsparken (King’s Park) in Malmö is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway and Sweden” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The park was designed by the Danish architect O. Høegh Hansen, and opened in 1872. Hansen’s design reflected French and Austrian influences of the 1850s and evoked both the romantic and baroque styles. Malmö is located in southern Sweden, just across Oresund Strait from Denmark. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the ...
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Restaurant in the Kungsparken, Malmo, Sweden
This photochrome print of the popular Kungsparken (King’s Park) in Malmö is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway and Sweden” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The park was designed by the Danish architect O. Høegh Hansen, and opened in 1872. Hansen’s design reflected French and Austrian influences of the 1850s and evoked both the romantic and baroque styles. As described by Baedeker’s Scandinavia: Norway, Sweden and Denmark: With Excursions to Iceland and Spitzbergen (1912), at the center of the park was a ...
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Kungstradgarden, Stockholm, Sweden
This photochrome print of the Kungstradgarden (King’s Garden) in Stockholm, Sweden, is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway and Sweden” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The park is located west of the national cathedral and covers more than 3.5 hectares. It originally served, in the 15th century, as the king’s kitchen garden. Later it was transformed by the French designer Jean Allard into a park intended to achieve a balance between nature and urbanization. The park was opened to the public in ...
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Church Square, Pretoria, South Africa, 1905
This 1905 photograph shows Church Square in Pretoria, South Africa, looking east. The cast iron fountain, known as the Sammy Marks Fountain, was imported from Ireland by businessman Sammy Marks (1843-1920) and moved from Church Square to the city zoo in 1910. Born in Lithuania, the son of a Jewish tailor, Marks came to South Africa in 1868. He began his career by peddling jewelry and cutlery, but soon became involved in the rapidly developing gold-, diamond-, and coal-mining industries. Behind the fountain is the recently completed Tudor Chambers, then ...
Brouckere Place and Anspach Monument, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of Brouckère Place and the Anspach Monument in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The monument was erected in 1897 to honor Jules Victor Anspach (1829–79), a former mayor of Brussels who championed urban development to benefit the city’s working class, and who was one of the chief promoters of Brussels’s boulevards. The monument features a large fountain designed by Emile Janlet (1839–1919), with sculptures by Paul de ...
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The Pantheon and the Rue Soufflot, Paris, France
This photochrome print is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in the Fifth Arrondissement (district) of Paris near the Luxembourg Gardens, the Panthéon was described in the 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers as standing “on the highest ground in the quarters of the city on the left bank, occupying the site of the tomb of Ste. Genevieve (422–512), the patron saint ...
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Place du Chatelet, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Place du Châtelet in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This public square is located on what was once the site of the medieval fortress of Grand Châtelet, which was built around 1130 by King Louis VI to defend the Ile de la Cité, the island in the River Seine that constitutes the historic center of Paris. Later in the 12th century, the fortress became a prison, which it ...
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Peterhof from Castle, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the palace of Peterhof in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Based on a design by the French architect Alexandre Jean-Baptiste LeBlond (1679–1719), Peterhof is regarded as the Russian Versailles. It was built by Peter the Great (1672–1725) as a summer residence. Located on the shore of the Neva Bay (or Gulf of Kronstadt), the palace offers a view of Kronstadt, the city ...
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The Vatican I, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of Vatican City is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Shown is Saint Peter’s Square (Piazza di San Pietro), which adjoins Saint Peter’s Basilica, one of the world’s largest Christian churches. The church and square are named for the Apostle Peter, the first Bishop of Rome and the first pope. Saint Peter is buried beneath the altar of the basilica. The square, designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598–1680), features two ...
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Fountain of Trevi, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of the Trevi Fountain (Fontana di Trevi) is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The fountain, 26 meters long by 20 meters wide, stands against the south side of the Palazzo Poli, a Baroque palace that was altered by Luigi Vanvitelli (1700–73) to accommodate the fountain and serve as its backdrop. The fountain dates back to ancient Rome, when this location was the terminal point for the Aqua Virgo aqueduct, which was commissioned ...
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Fountain in Mosque of El Kebir, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Great Mosque in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Al-Djamaa el-Kabir (the Great Mosque) was first built in about 1097 and, although subsequently much modified, is regarded as a rare architectural survival of the Almoravid period in North Africa. Abu Takhfin added the minaret in 1322–24; the French added the gallery on the outside of the building in 1837–40 when they rebuilt the street. According to the 1911 edition ...
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Museum: Entrance Hall, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Musée National des Antiquités Algériennes in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The museum, which opened in 1897, was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as containing “the finest collection of the kind in Algeria.” The print depicts the museum’s entrance hall, holding part of the collection of ancient columns and sculpture. The hall shows the fine decorative architectural ...
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The Fountain of Sultan Ahmed, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Fountain of Sultan Ahmed III in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The fountain was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as having been “erected in 1728, the finest sebil [fountain] in the city, with a well-preserved timber roof.” The rounded towers at the angles covered with grilles would have allowed kiosk attendants inside to provide cups of ...
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A Street at Stamboul with Fountain, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of a street in Stambul (on the European side of Constantinople, present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The scene shows the Koca Sinan Pasha complex in the Fatih part of the city. It includes a sebil (fountain) and the tomb of Ottoman architect Sinan (1489 or 1490–1588). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described Stambul as “the chief seat of the Oriental ...
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