34 results in English
Album of the Coats of Arms of Ukraine
This collection of prints depicts the historic coats of arms and flags of Ukraine. The work is by Mykola Bytynsʹkyĭ (1893–1972), a Ukrainian painter and expert on heraldry. Bytynsʹkyĭ fought in the Ukrainian War for Independence at the end of World War I and later immigrated to Prague where he studied arts and produced several works on heraldry. After World War II, he lived in a displaced persons camp in Germany, before immigrating to Canada. The coat of arms of Ukraine, a trident on a blue shield, was officially ...
Olympic Games, Stockholm, 1912
The Stockholm Olympiad of 1912 marked the transition of the modern Olympic Games from what had been a modest-sized athletic competition into a global media event. The preparation and build-up for the games, the venues built especially for them, and media exposure all began to overshadow the fabric of the athletic competitions themselves. This media event emphasized both global and national dimensions and was meticulously conceived by the organizers. Recognizing that technology was evolving quickly and that visual images crossed borders unhindered, the committee mounted an innovative international media campaign ...
Ringling Bros. World’s Greatest Shows
This colorful lithograph advertising the Ringling Bros. Circus was printed by the Strobridge Lithographing Company of Cincinnati, Ohio, and New York, a significant producer of circus posters. The poster depicts the immense size of a large American circus in the early part of the 20th century and is an example of the colorful, eye-catching advertisements commonly used by circuses to attract crowds. The texts at the bottom proclaim “A Magic Moving City of Tents, The Home of Many Marvels, Largest Show Ever Perfected. A Really Great World’s Exposition,” and ...
Contributed by Circus World Museum
Erecting the Big Top, Cole Bros. Circus, 1937
This image from the 1930s shows the Cole Bros. Circus setting the side poles in preparation for erecting the big top tent, a scene that was common at every American circus at that time. In the background can be seen another tent, already set up. Alternating United States and Cole Bros. flags are flying at the top of the six center poles. Cole Bros. Circus was established in 1884 by William Washington Cole (1847–1915) as “W.W. Cole’s New Colossal Shows.” In the 1930s, when this photograph was ...
Contributed by Circus World Museum
A Protester during the Riots of February 1848
This daguerreotype portrait of a protester was made at the end of the riots of February 1848 in Paris. The unidentified photographer was most likely inexperienced in the technique, as the text on the flag, “République Liberté Egalité Fraternité 22, 23, 24 février” (Republic Liberty Equality Brotherhood, 22, 23, 24 February), is reversed. A professional photographer would have used the mirror system invented earlier to correct the image in the dark room. Beyond this misstep, however, the viewer can sense the photographer’s intense desire to immortalize the face of ...
Quarters for Chinese Troops. Gansu, China, 1875
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Troops Carrying Flags in Military Formation, Preceded by Four Cannons. Gansu Province, China, 1875
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Manifesto to the Czechoslovak People in America
In World War I, all sides used posters as tools to mobilize their populations for the war effort. “'Manifest k Ceskoslovenskému lidu v Americe!" (Manifesto to the Czechoslovak people in America) is one of a series of posters created by Vojtech Preissig (1873-1944) that encouraged Czech and Slovak volunteers to fight with the Czechoslovak Legion against Austria-Hungary and Germany to further the cause of an independent Czechoslovakia. Preissig was a Czech artist living in the United States. The poster was designed and printed at the Wentworth Institute in Boston and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Restaurant in the Kungsparken, Malmo, Sweden
This photochrome print of the popular Kungsparken (King’s Park) in Malmö is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway and Sweden” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The park was designed by the Danish architect O. Høegh Hansen, and opened in 1872. Hansen’s design reflected French and Austrian influences of the 1850s and evoked both the romantic and baroque styles. As described by Baedeker’s Scandinavia: Norway, Sweden and Denmark: With Excursions to Iceland and Spitzbergen (1912), at the center of the park was a ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
America's Answer: The Second Official United States War Picture
This World War I poster advertises the film America’s Answer, which was made by the Division of Films of the Committee on Public Information, a government body established in the United States to foster public unity and generate support for the war. The committee was headed by muckraking journalist George Creel (1876–1953). The film, which was released in U.S. theaters on July 14, 1918, is a documentary (part of the Following the Flag to France series) about the arrival in France of the first half-million American troops ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Are YOU in This?
This 1915 poster, published in London for the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, shows soldiers and other citizens busy with war work, as a well-dressed man looks on pensively. The man is clearly being urged to enlist. Until March 2, 1916, when the Military Service Act introduced conscription, Great Britain’s World War I army was comprised entirely of volunteers, and many of the most famous wartime posters were recruitment appeals. The Parliamentary Recruiting Committee was set up following the outbreak of war in August 1914. A cross-party organization chaired by the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Britain Expects Every Son of Israel to do His Duty
This 1918 World War I recruiting poster was designed to encourage Jewish immigrants to Canada to enlist in the Canadian armed forces to help the Allied war effort against Germany and Austria-Hungary. Underlining British sympathy for the oppressed Jewish populations of central and eastern Europe, the poster shows a soldier cutting the bonds from a Jewish man, who strains to join a group of soldiers running in the distance and says, "You have cut my bonds and set me free—now let me help you set others free!" The message ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Britishers, Enlist To-day
This World War I poster showing the British flag was published in New York in 1917 and was aimed at encouraging British citizens living in the United States to enlist in the armed forces. The poster lists 280 Broadway in lower Manhattan as the location of a recruitment office. In January 1916, the British Parliament passed the Military Service Act, which went into effect on March 2, 1916. The act specified that men between the ages of 18 and 41 could be called up for service in the army. Men ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Columbia Calls. Enlist Now for U.S. Army
This World War I recruiting poster shows the symbolic figure of Columbia, a poetic name for and female personification of the United States, holding a U.S. flag and a sword while standing on top of a globe. In the lower right of the poster is the text of a patriotic poem, “Columbia Calls.” According to a story in the New York Times published on June 3, 1917, the design of the poster and the poem, both by Frances Adams Halsted (Mrs. E. Bayard Halsted), dated from 1916, when Halsted ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Emblems of Liberty and Humanity. The Red Cross, Mother of All Nations
This Spanish-language poster is one in a series issued by the American Red Cross during World War I featuring the flags of the countries allied or associated with the United States in the war. This poster shows two Red Cross nurses. One nurse, depicted as a Madonna figure, appears to cradle in her arms a litter used to transport wounded soldiers, between the flags of Panama and the United States. The title reads: “Emblemas de la libertad y de la humanidad. La Cruz Roja, madre de todas las naciones” (Emblems ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Emblems of Liberty and Humanity. The Red Cross, Mother of All Nations
This Spanish-language poster is one in a series issued by the American Red Cross during World War I featuring the flags of the countries allied or associated with the United States in the war. This poster shows two Red Cross nurses. One nurse, depicted as a Madonna figure, cradles in her arms a wounded soldier on a litter between the flags of Bolivia and the United States. The title reads: “Emblemas de la libertad y de la humanidad. La Cruz Roja, madre de todas las naciones” (Emblems of liberty and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Emblems of Liberty and Humanity. The Red Cross, Mother of All Nations
This poster, with text in Japanese and English, is one in a series issued by the American Red Cross during World War I featuring the flags of the countries allied or associated with the United States in the war. This poster shows two Red Cross nurses. One nurse, depicted as a Madonna figure, cradles in her arms a wounded soldier on a litter between the flags of Japan and the United States. The title reads: “Emblems of liberty and humanity. The Red Cross, mother of all nations.” Japan entered the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Many Peoples - One Nation
During World War I, President Woodrow Wilson and other U.S. political leaders were concerned about disunity among the American people. They were particularly anxious that so-called hyphenated Americans, Americans born abroad or of foreign heritage, might prove disloyal. For example, Irish-Americans might be bitter at British rule in Ireland or German-Americans could be sympathetic to Germany. In response, U.S. leaders launched a widespread “Americanization” campaign involving both government agencies and private organizations. This poster, with the slogan “Many peoples - one nation. Let us unite to Americanize America,” was ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Poles! Kościuszko and Pułaski Fought for the Liberty of Poland and Other Nations. Follow Their Example. Enlist in the Polish Army!
This World War I poster invokes the memory of two illustrious Poles who fought in the American Revolution, Tadeusz Kościuszko (1746–1817) and Kazimierz Pułaski (1747–79), to encourage men of Polish origin living in the United States to enlist in the Polish army. Poland had been partitioned by Russia, Prussia, and the Austrian Empire in 1795, and its sovereignty was not restored until 1918. There thus was no independent Poland during World War I. But many Poles believed that the cause of national independence could be furthered by supporting ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Emblems of Liberty and Humanity. The Red Cross, Mother of All Nations
This French-language poster is one in a series issued by the American Red Cross during World War I featuring the flags of the countries allied or associated with the United States in the war. This poster shows two Red Cross nurses. One nurse, depicted as a Madonna figure, cradles in her arms a wounded soldier on a litter between the flags of Haiti and the United States. The title reads: “Symboles de la liberté et de l'humanité. La Croix Rouge, la mère de toutes les nations.” (Emblems of liberty ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Welcome Noble Belgium
This 1917 poster shows Belgium and the United States greeting each other in front of the flags of these two countries, marking the U.S. entry into World War I. Belgium is represented by a woman holding the coat of arms of the kingdom, which features a lion (Leo Belgicus) and the national motto: L’Union fait la force (Unity makes strength). The United States is represented by the figure of “Columbia,” the female personification of America that was widely used in the late 19th and early 20th century and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Subscribe to the 7th War Loan
This World War I poster, published in 1917, urges citizens of Austria-Hungary to subscribe to the latest war bond. It depicts a woman, representing the Austro-Hungarian Empire, holding a flag. The name of the sponsoring bank is given at the bottom. Like the other belligerents, Austria-Hungary relied heavily on the sale of bonds to its citizens to finance its participation in the war. The country issued its first war bond in November 1914, at a five percent rate of return with a five-year maturity. Thereafter bonds were issued at six-month ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Emblems of Liberty and Humanity. The Red Cross, Mother of all Nations
This Portuguese-language poster is one in a series issued by the American Red Cross during World War I featuring the flags of the countries allied or associated with the United States in the war. This poster shows two Red Cross nurses. One nurse, depicted as a Madonna figure, cradles in her arms a wounded soldier on a litter between the flags of Brazil and the United States. The title reads: “Symbolos da liberdade y da humanidade. A Crux Vermelha, Mãe de todas as nacões” (Emblems of liberty and humanity. The ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Territory of Hawaii Registration Day July 31
The Selective Service Act, signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson on May 19, 1917, required all male U.S. citizens and resident aliens from age 21 to 30 to register for the draft. On the day of registration, June 5, 1917, 9,660,000 young men presented themselves at local selective service boards, where they were asked to give their name, address, age, distinguishing physical features, and reason, if any, for claiming exemption. Three additional registrations took place, on June 5, August 24, and September 12 of 1918. Hawaii ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Nation is Fighting for its Life. All Men Should Enroll for National Service
This 1915 poster shows the figure of Britannia, holding a flag with the words “National Service” emblazoned on it. The caption below reads “Who Follows?” The bottom line states: “Forms for offer of services can be obtained at all post offices, national service offices, and employment exchanges.” Until March 2, 1916, when the Military Service Act introduced conscription, Great Britain’s World War I army was comprised entirely of volunteers, and many of the most famous wartime posters were recruitment appeals. The illustration on this poster was reproduced with permission ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The American Ambulance in Russia
This World War I poster, published in New York circa 1917, solicits funds for a volunteer American ambulance company in Russia. American ambulance services on the Western front in France were extensive and well-organized; this poster advertises a much smaller effort on what was then the Eastern front of the war. The poster shows a medieval Russian soldier on horseback carrying a Russian flag, with a caption, in Russian, stating: “Military loan. Forward for the Motherland.” The illustration is signed by the artist, A.O. Maksimov. Russia was at this ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kuropatkin Secures Safety - Your Flag Does Not Work, Try Another
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Russian Soldier Shows White Flag Plainly to Japanese Army: “Oh! Say, Can You See?”
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Those Who are God’s Warriors. The Czechoslovak Army in France
This World War I poster is one of a series by Czech artist Vojtěch Preissig (1873–1944) urging Czech and Slovak volunteers living in the United States to join the Czechoslovak Legion to fight against Germany and Austria-Hungary. It shows a soldier on horseback carrying the flag of the Hussites, followers of the Czech religious reformer Jan Hus (circa 1369–1415). The Czech lands and Slovakia were part of Austria-Hungary and leaders of the national independence movement believed that the cause of an independent Czechoslovak state could be furthered by ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Qasr Al-Hosn, the Ruler's Fort in Abu Dhabi
This 1965 photograph shows Qasr Al-Hosn, the traditional fortress residence of the shaykhs of Abu Dhabi. Originally built as a watchtower in about 1761 by Shaykh Dhiyab bin Isa, it was expanded into a small fort in about 1793 by his son, Shaykh Shakhbut bin Dhiyab, and at that time was made the permanent residence of the ruler of Abu Dhabi. It was further expanded in the late 1930s following the influx of revenue from oil concessions, and it remained the main palace of Abu Dhabi until 1966. Seen flying ...
Cuba Shall Be Free
This chromolithograph is an allegorical composition. It shows a Cuban soldier holding the national flag on the left, the winged figure of Victory at the right, a coat of arms at lower center with cannonballs and military band instruments, and ships in the background. The title reads Cuba Sera Libre (Cuba shall be free), with the dates October 31 to November 4, 1873 indicated on the banner at the bottom. The title and the dates refer to the Virginius Incident, in which the Virginius, a blockade runner previously employed in ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
S.F. Jacoby and Company. Importers and Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Marble in All Their Varieties. J.K. and M. Freedley Dealers in American Marble
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement contains a montage of three titled views showing the sites involved in the operations of the Jacoby and Freedley companies. The scenes are separated and surrounded by an ornate border, comprised of patriotic imagery on top, including an eagle clutching the American flag and shield near a bust of George Washington and the state seals of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Filigree, foliage, and tassels decorate the ...
Chinese General’s Wife
This work is one of a pair of original unsigned gouache watercolors, painted by an unknown hand and dating from the early 19th century, depicting a Chinese general and his wife. Shown here is the general’s wife, seated outside a row of tents. Near her is a staff with an oval shield bearing an animated and fearsome face. The same shield appears in her husband’s portrait, but with a different banner above it. The wife’s lady-in-waiting is kneeling at her right. Both women wear finely detailed costumes ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
Chinese General, Circa 1810
This work is one of a pair of original unsigned gouache watercolors, painted by an unknown hand and dating from the early 19th century, depicting a Chinese general and his wife. Shown here is the general, who is seated outside his tent. He is wearing an elaborate gown and holds a spear. The tent pole bears an oval shield with an animated and fearsome face above which a standard banner flutters in the breeze. To the left is a standard bearer standing with a command flag. The same shield appears ...
Contributed by Brown University Library