4 results in English
Fire Squad in the City of Vytegra. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Destruction by Fire of Pennsylvania Hall. On the Night of the 17th May, 1838
This dramatic print shows the destruction of Pennsylvania Hall, a large building that was constructed in 1837–38 at Sixth and Haines Streets in Philadelphia as a meeting place for local abolitionist (antislavery) groups. Dedication ceremonies began on May 14, 1838, and continued over several days in a climate of growing hostility from anti-abolitionist forces in the city. On the night of May 17, 1838, an anti-abolitionist mob stormed the hall and set it on fire. Fire companies refused to fight the blaze, and the building was completely destroyed. A ...
The Weccacoe Engine Company's House and the Reception of the United Fire Company of Baltimore
This print celebrates a reception for the firefighters of the United Fire Company of Baltimore hosted by the Weccacoe Fire Company firefighters of Philadelphia at the Weccacoe engine house. Both companies wear uniforms. The Weccacoe firefighters (left) wear long, belted jackets under red capes adorned with "Weccacoe W.E.S" and hats marked "Weccacoe 1800" on the front and "FA" (Fire Association of Philadelphia) on the back. The United Fire Co. firefighters (right) are dressed in red jackets with green lapels, green and gold hats labeled "Union" on the front ...
In Commemoration of the Great Parade of the Philadelphia Fire Department, October 16th, 1865
This tinted print commemorates the great parade of the Philadelphia Fire Department on October 16, 1865, and is dedicated to the Philadelphia firemen and their “visiting brethren.” The text at the bottom lists the fire companies participating in the parade, mainly from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, but some from as far away as Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. The print is based on an illustration by Francis H. Schell (1834–1909), an artist, illustrator, and lithographer in Philadelphia, who later worked in New York for Frank Leslie ...