11 results in English
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
View 5 more issues
The Melanesians of British New Guinea
Charles Gabriel Seligman (1873–1940) was a British ethnographer who conducted field research in New Guinea, Sarawak, Ceylon (present-day Sri Lanka), and Sudan. Trained as a medical doctor, in 1898 he joined an expedition organized by Cambridge University to the Torres Strait, the body of water that separates the island of New Guinea from Australia. The purpose of the expedition was to document the cultures of the Torres Strait islanders, which were rapidly disappearing under the influence of colonization. In 1904, Seligman was one of three members of the Cooke ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Victoria Nyanza. The Land, the Races and their Customs, with Specimens of Some of the Dialects
Lake Victoria (in the Bantu language, Victoria Nyanza), is the largest lake in Africa and the second largest body of fresh water in the world, surpassed only by Lake Superior in North America. The lake is crossed by the equator, and is the chief source of the Nile River. The first European to reach the lake was the British explorer John Hanning Speke in 1858, who named it after Britain’s Queen Victoria. In 1890, at the height of the European scramble for colonies in Africa, Britain and Germany divided ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Uganda Protectorate: Attempt to Give Some Description of the Physical Geography, Botany, Zoology, Anthropology, Languages and History of the Territories under British Protection in East Central Africa
This two-volume work by Sir Henry Hamilton (Harry) Johnston, a British explorer, writer, and colonial official who spent much of his career in Africa, is an encyclopedic compilation of information about Uganda, which became a British protectorate in 1894. Johnston was asked by the crown, in 1899, to spend two years in Uganda as a special commissioner, in order to establish civilian administration after a period of disastrous military rule. He concluded an agreement with the ruling chiefs of Buganda that helped bring stability to the country. During his term ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Region of Chad and the Oudai; Ethnographic Studies, Toubou Dialect
Henri Carbou was a French colonial official and ethnographer who undertook pioneering studies of the peoples of Chad and Sudan and their languages. The groups discussed in this two-volume work include the Kanembou, the Toubou, the Ouaddai, the Arabs, and many others. Carbou’s sources included his own observations, works by Arab writers, and earlier works by Europeans, including the two great German explorers of central Africa, Heinrich Barth (1821-65) and Gustav Nachtigal (1834-85). Carbou’s works still are used by scholars interested in the dialects of Chad and Sudan.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Journey to the East Indies and China, Undertaken at the King's Command, from 1774 until 1781: In Which the Religious Mores, Sciences, and Arts of the Indians, the Chinese, the Pegouins, and the Madegasse are Discussed.
Pierre Sonnerat (1748-1814) was a French naturalist and explorer who made several voyages to southeast Asia between 1769 and 1781. He published this two-volume account of his voyage of 1774-81 in 1782. Volume 1 deals exclusively with India, whose culture Sonnerat very much admired, and is especially noteworthy for its extended discussion of religion in India, Hinduism in particular. Volume 2 covers Sonnerat’s travels to China, Burma, Madagascar, the Maldives, Mauritius, Ceylon (present-day Sri Lanka), Indonesia, and the Philippines. The book is illustrated with engravings based on Sonnerat’s ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Through Unknown African Countries: the First Expedition from Somaliland to Lake Rudolf
A. Donaldson Smith was an American medical doctor and amateur big-game hunter who, in 1894-95, undertook an 18-month expedition from Berbera, Somalia (then British Somaliland) to Lake Turkana (then Lake Rudolf) in Kenya. He explored the headwaters of the Shabeelle River in Ethiopia and, on his return journey, descended the Tana River to the Kenyan coast. This book is his account of the expedition. Its appendices contain detailed descriptions and illustrations of the fishes, spiders and scorpions, moths, geological specimens, fossils, plants, and ethnographic objects collected on the expedition. Also ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Dictionary of Countries
Yaqut Al- Hamawi (from Hamah, Syria, 1179–1229 AD, 574–626 AH) was an Arab geographer of Greek origins. Born in Byzantium (the ancient Greek city also known as Constantinople, or present-day Istanbul), he was captured in war and enslaved. He was purchased by a Baghdad merchant, who gave him a good education and ultimately freed him. Yaqut traveled extensively in Egypt, Syria, Iraq, and Persia (present-day Iran). His Mu'jam al-Buldan (Dictionary of countries) is a vast geographical encyclopedia, which summarizes nearly all medieval knowledge of the globe. The ...
Contributed by Bibliotheca Alexandrina
General Map of Asiatic Russia: Showing an Up-to-Date Division into Provinces and Regions, Maritime Administration of the Maritime Region, and the Routes of Russian Seafarers
This Russian map of Siberia shows the borders of regions and districts, population centers, roads, fortresses, redoubts, outposts, guard posts, factories, mines, and ruins. It also indicates the territories of the various nationalities of Siberia and shows in fine detail the routes taken by the major Russian explorers--Bering, Billings, Kruzenshtern, Golovin, Sarychev, Gall--on their expeditions to the North Pacific and Alaska. The map was produced by the Corps of Military Topographers which, under a government regulation of 1822, was attached to the General Staff and the Military Topographical Depot “to ...
Uganda and Its Peoples; Notes on the Protectorate of Uganda, Especially the Anthropology and Ethnology of Its Indigenous Races
Uganda and Its Peoples is a detailed survey of the native peoples of the Uganda Protectorate, as understood by early 20th-century ethnography and anthropology. The book is organized in nine chapters, each of which is devoted to one of the main ethnic and tribal groups: Bahima, Banyoro, Batoro, Banabuddu, Sese Islanders, Bakoki, Basoga, Bavuma, and Baganda. Topics covered include marriage ceremonies, birth ceremonies, diet, death ceremonies, beliefs and superstitions, history, law, systems of weights and measures, folklore, customs and traditions, and economic activities. Included are portraits of the kings of ...
Men and Creatures in Uganda
This book is a first-hand account of a trip taken by John Bland-Sutton (1855–1936) in 1910 from the port of Mombasa (present-day Kenya) to Uganda and back to the coast via the Rift Valley of Ethiopia and Kenya. Bland-Sutton was a distinguished British surgeon who did pioneering work in several areas of medicine. His interest in the natural sciences is reflected in his careful descriptions of the animals he observed, which included antelopes, gazelles, lions, crocodiles, and many species of birds. The book also provides descriptions of the Masai ...