22 results
Trevelyon Miscellany, 1608
Thomas Trevilian, or Trevelyon, a London craftsman of whom little is known, created his miscellany in 1608 when he was about the age of 60. The bulky manuscript of 290 double-sided folios contains texts and images appropriated from books, woodcuts, and engravings of his day. Part one of the manuscript (leaves 3–36) consists of historical and practical information: a time line; an illustrated calendar; moralizing proverbs; a series of computational tables and astronomical diagrams; lists of families linked to William the Conqueror; distances between London and cities around the ...
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Folger Shakespeare Library
Embroidery Class at Paco School, Manila, Philippine Islands
This photograph of a scene in the Philippines is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film ...
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Library of Congress
Plashchanitsa Shroud with Image of Christ, Embroidered by Anastasiia Romanova (Iureva Zakhareva, First Wife of Ivan the Terrible, 1547) in 1543, and Patriarch Iov's Epigonation. Staritsa Assumption Monastery
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Vozdukhi (Sacramental Cloth Cover.) Gift from the Nun Marfa, the Mother of Tsar Mikhail Feodorovich. In the Church of the Annunciation. Makarev Monastery
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Palitsa with a Picture of the Holy Trinity. In the Vestry of the Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Palitsa with a Picture of Abraham and Sarah. In the Vestry of the Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Vozdukh Sacramental Cloth Cover with the Head of Adam. In the Vestry of Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Plashchanitsa (Shroud with the Image of Christ) Gift from Count Stroganov. In the Vestry of the Assumption Cathedral in the Kremlin. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Phelonion Vestment. From the Time of Tsar Mikhail Feodorovich. In the Vestry of the Assumption Cathedral. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Phelonion Vestment Dating to 1635 and Belonging to Metropolitan Varlaam. In the Vestry of the Assumption Cathedral in the Kremlin. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Vozdukhi Sacramental Cloth Cover from the Seventeenth Century, Embroidered in Silver. Museum Inventory Number 1923. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Church Cover for the Holy Eucharist, Embroidered with Gold on Velvet, from the Seventeenth Century. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Shroud from the Sixteenth Century, Depicting the Venerable Avraam, Embroidered with Gold and Black Thread on Silk. According to Legend, Placed on Saint Avraam Rostovskii's Tomb by Tsar Ivan the Terrible upon His Return from the Kazan Campaign. Museu
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Crimson Damask Ribbon, Embroidered with Gold, Depicting the Kazan Mother of God, Sewn with Gold. Vozdukh Sacramental Cloth Cover from Seventeenth Century. Museum Inventory Number 5578-1106. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth and Woven Sashes
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
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Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth and Pouch
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
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Library of Congress
Display of Patterned and Embroidered Cloth
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
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Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth with Label in Russian
Tver is an ancient city (first mentioned in 1135) on the Volga River to the northwest of Moscow. Opened in 1866, the Tver Museum displayed natural and archeological items of interest as well as works of art and crafts from the region of Tver. Seen here is an elaborately-embroidered oplechye (shoulder cloth) for a phelonion (liturgical vestment), similar to a chasuble and worn over the priest’s other vestments. The inscription proclaims that the oplechye was a gift of Mikhail Fedorovich, the first Romanov tsar. In 1897 the Tver Museum ...
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Library of Congress
Display of Religious Textiles
Tver is an ancient city (first mentioned in 1135) on the Volga River to the northwest of Moscow. Opened in 1866, the Tver Museum displayed natural and archeological items of interest as well as works of art and crafts from the region of Tver. Seen here are elaborately embroidered 17th-century examples of the epitrachilion (from Greek, meaning “around the neck”), a liturgical vestment similar to a stole worn by Orthodox clergy when conducting a service. In 1897 the Tver Museum was allocated space in the Imperial Transit Palace. Nationalized in ...
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Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth and Pouches
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Luce Ben Aben School of Arab Embroidery I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the interior of a school of embroidery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 1845 the Frenchwoman Eugénie Luce (1804–82) opened a school for Muslim girls in Algiers that was intended to educate local girls along European lines. She included teaching needlework in the curriculum, along with French and other subjects. In 1861 the French Algerian administration withdrew funding from the school. The emphasis of the school shifted from general ...
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Library of Congress