7 results in English
Echo of Babylon, Number 4, September 3, 1909
Seda Babel (Echo of Babylon), first published in 1909 in Baghdad, was among Iraq’s earliest newspapers. It appeared weekly on Friday. Until the end of World War I, Iraq was part of the Ottoman Empire and was subject to Ottoman law. In 1908, in line with the liberalizing revolution of the Young Turks, imperial press regulation loosened, allowing Iraq’s intellectuals and writers the freedom to publish newspapers, magazines, and books. Seda Babel was one of more than a dozen newspapers to appear as a result, and part of ...
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"Jottings at the Dream Brook Studio," in the Family Collection of Chen Guyu, in 26 Juan
Mengxi bi tan (Jottings at the Dream Brook Studio) was written in encyclopedic form as a collection of hundreds of articles by Shen Kuo (1031−95), a Song polymath, scientist, statesman, and artist. The work was written at Mengxi (Dream Brook) Garden, his estate in Runzhou (near present-day Zhenjiang, Jiangsu), thus the title. This work’s extraordinarily broad coverage includes astronomy, physics, mathematics, geology, geography, biological medicine, contemporary politics, military affairs, economics, and anecdotes about the arts and literature. It is also a very important document in the history of ...
Contributed by National Library of China
We Live and Work According to Lenin: Atlas of the Novosibirsk Region
The Communist Party of the Soviet Union drew its legitimacy from the life and work of Vladimir I. Lenin, the leading figure of the Russian Revolution and the founder of the Soviet state. This late Soviet-era atlas of the Siberian region of Novosibirsk contains, in addition to its 32 maps, sections on V. I. Lenin and Siberia, the establishment of Soviet power in Novosibirsk, and the participation of the region in the Great Patriotic War (World War II), as well as descriptions of the industrial, agricultural, educational, and cultural achievements ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
Strolls Around Tobol'sk in 1830
Tobol'sk was founded by the Cossack Danila Chulkov in 1587 on the site of a Tatar town. It is considered the father of Siberian cities. Thanks to its position on the Great Siberian Post Road, Tobol'sk became the main administrative point for all of Siberia. Until 1824 it was the seat of government for Western Siberia. This book offers a portrait of the city during the first third of the 19th century through the eyes of one of its residents. The end of the book contains a set ...
Contributed by Russian State Library
Contributions to the Geography of South-West Africa
Fritz Jaeger and Leo Waibel were professors of geography in Germany who, in late 1913, were commissioned by the German colonial office to explore the northern part of German South-West Africa (present-day Namibia). They arrived in the colony in mid-1914 and soon were caught up in the events of World War I, which broke out in August of that year. Both men were drafted into the German Protection Force and fought in engagements with the South African forces entering German South-West Africa from the south. They were released from military ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Politico-economic Review of Basarabia
This report provides an overview of political and economic conditions in Bessarabia (present-day Moldova) in the immediate aftermath of World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the transfer of the province from Russian to Romanian control. The work is by Captain John Kaba, a U.S. Army officer who completed a two-month survey of the province in the spring of 1919 on behalf of the American Relief Administration. Headed by Herbert Hoover, the international mining engineer and future U.S. president who had organized volunteer relief efforts during World War ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Articles in Pink Urdu
This publication consists of articles written by Siddiq Irshad Mullā Rumūzī (also seen as Ramozi, 1896–1952), a celebrated Urdu humorist and satirist. His subjects here are politicians and their actions, events involving politicians, and the state of the economy. His essays in this booklet also poke fun at so-called religious people, whom he deems imperceptive of the true essence of Islam and who blindly follow old traditions without any logic. While disapproving of people and situations and suggesting reforms, Mullā Rumūzī was careful not to criticize his country. Critics ...