6 results in English
On Keeping Shop: A Guidebook for Preparing Orders
This highly informative work, compiled by a Jewish apothecary in 13th century Cairo, provides a wealth of information on his craft as practiced at the time. The author, Abu al-Munā Ibn Abī Nasr Ibn Hafāż, known as Cohen al-Isra’ī'lī al-Hārūnī, completed the work in 1260 (AH 658), shortly after the Mongol sacking of Baghdad in 1258, an event that reverberated throughout the Arab world. The manuscript contains notes by the author, to be passed to his son and descendents, who would be taking over the apothecary shop after ...
John Horn, Drugs and Chemical Store. Northeast Corner of Third and Brown Streets, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1846 shows the drugs and chemical store of John Horn, located at 801 North Third Street in Philadelphia, where he operated from 1829 to 1871. A large banner above the main entrances to the building reads "J. Horn Drugs & Chemical Store. City & county physicians can always be supplied with medicines & chemicals of the purest kind prepared with the greatest care from the latest French, English, German, & American journals." A customer is seen entering the establishment, while another looks at the wares displayed in the window. A ...
Moyer & Hazard, Successors of Alexander Fullerton, 174 Market Street, Fifth Door Above Fifth Street, Philadelphia. Elijah Bowen, Wholesale & Retail Hat & Cap Store, 176 Market Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the adjacent businesses of wholesale druggists Charles Moyer and A. Fullerton Hazard (successors of Alexander Fullerton), and wholesale and retail hatter, Elijah Bowen. Both buildings are covered in signage. The "Alexander Fullerton drugs medicine & paints" signs on number 174 indicate the recent shift in ownership. A man stands in the left doorway of 174 directing a laborer who moves goods on ...
Robert Shoemaker's Wholesale and Retail Drugstore, Southwest Corner of Second and Green Streets, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is Shoemaker’s drugstore on the 200 block of Green Street. Signs advertise Wetherill's white lead, drugs, medicines, paints, oils, glass, dyestuffs, "window glass of all sizes," picture glass, "cheap glass for hot beds," "white lead warranted pure by the ton or pound," ready-mixed paints, linseed oil, plasters, potash, and soda. A patron enters past barrels and sacks. Two clerks stand at the long ...
John C. Baker and Company, Wholesale Dealers and Importers of Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Paints and Dye Stuffs. Number 100, North Third Street, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1849 shows the five-story storefront, adorned with signage and an ornamental ironwork balcony, of the druggist located at 100 North Third Street, Philadelphia. A patron enters the establishment as a crate is hoisted in front of him. To the left, the window and second entrance of the building are open, and casks, jugs, bottles, and boxes line a wall of shelves and the floor. Additional inventory is visible near the upper windows. A clerk oversees the loading of a cart with boxes and barrels, while pedestrians ...
William W. Clark, Drug and Chemical Warehouse, 16 North Fifth Street, Philadelphia. Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Glass, & Et cetera. Paint, Oil, and Glass, English, French, German, & Mediterranean Drugs
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the premises of William Clark, druggist, at 16 North Fifth Street. Signs advertise "Drugs, Paint, Oil, & Glass, English, French, German, & Mediterranean Drugs." Through the open entranceways of the business shelves of bottles on cabinets are visible lining the walls. A clerk reaches for one of the potions as a patron enters the store. Another clerk descends into the cellar in front of the building ...