8 results
The Harbor and Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts Algiers's harbor, which had been redesigned and greatly expanded by the French in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into ...
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Harbor by Moonlight, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Dating from 1899, it depicts a section of the harbor of Algiers. The harbor was first constructed in 1518 under the reign of the Turkish admiral, Khair-ed-in. For hundreds of years, Algerian pirates maintained and secured the harbor against the naval powers of Europe. When the French occupied Algeria in the 1830s, they made the harbor a center of commerce and naval power, and greatly expanded the port, which ...
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Fish Market, Bergen, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows the Bergen fish market as it looked in the last decade of the 19th century. According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers, “fish has always been the staple commodity of Bergen, which is the greatest fish-mart in Norway. The Hanseatic merchants compelled the northern fishermen to send their fish to Bergen, and to the present day the trade still flows mainly ...
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Arrival of Emigrants [i.e. Immigrants], Ellis Island
This film, by Gottfried Wilhelm "Billy" Bitzer of the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, was among the first films of this accomplished cameraman. It is reminiscent of contemporary films of Ellis Island shot by the Edison Manufacturing Company. It depicts scenes at the Immigration Depot and a nearby dock on Ellis Island. It appears to show, first, a group of immigrants lined up to board a vessel leaving the island, then another group arriving at the island and being directed off of the dock and into the depot by a ...
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Entrance to Port, Ostend, Belgium
This photochrome print of the port in Ostend is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in West Flanders on the coast of the North Sea, Ostend is one of Belgium’s main port cities. Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905) called Ostend “the second seaport and the most fashionable sea-bathing resort of Belgium.” Visible to the right is the Western Pier, which was built in 1837 to accommodate the city’s ...
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Emigrants [i.e. Immigrants] Landing at Ellis Island
Ellis Island was the gateway to American life for millions of immigrants from 1892 to 1954. This film, shot by prolific filmmaker, writer, producer, and director Alfred C. Abadie, was a production of Thomas A. Edison’s Edison Manufacturing Company. It was listed in a contemporary company catalog under the title “Emigrants Landing at Ellis Island” with the description: “Shows a large open barge loaded with people of every nationality, who have just arrived from Europe, disembarking at Ellis Island, N.Y.” The film opens with a view of the ...
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The Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the admiralty in the port of Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The original Spanish port was destroyed and rebuilt by Kheireddin Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546), a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French greatly expanded the port and occupied the neo-Moorish Palais de l’Amirauté (Admiralty Palace). As described by the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “one could traverse ...
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Disembarking from a Ship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers, and meeting and greeting people on the quay, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to Algiers, and ...
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