Narrow results:

Place

Time Period

Topic

Additional Subjects

Type of Item

Language

Institution

73 results
Album of the Coats of Arms of Ukraine
This collection of prints depicts the historic coats of arms and flags of Ukraine. The work is by Mykola Bytynsʹkyĭ (1893–1972), a Ukrainian painter and expert on heraldry. Bytynsʹkyĭ fought in the Ukrainian War for Independence at the end of World War I and later immigrated to Prague where he studied arts and produced several works on heraldry. After World War II, he lived in a displaced persons camp in Germany, before immigrating to Canada. The coat of arms of Ukraine, a trident on a blue shield, was officially ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Protocol of the Convent of Bratislava (Heraldic Codex)
Protocollum Venerabilis Conventus Posoniensis (Protocol of the convent of Bratislava) is a heraldic codex containing a list of the patrons and donors of a religious institution in Bratislava with 67 full-page painted miniatures of their respective coats of arms. The last listing was created in 1763. The armorial book was begun in 1710 in Bratislava at the request of Ľudovít Kirkay, the superior of the local Franciscan convent, who most probably was inspired by a model of the Historia Domus protocol of the Bratislava convent dated 1709. The coats of ...
Contributed by
Slovak National Library
Royal Writ of the Foundation of the City of Tlaxcala
This royal writ or decree, by order of the Emperor Charles V, confers upon the city of Tlaxcala, Mexico, a coat of arms and the title of "Loyal City," in recognition of the services "which the noblemen and towns of the said province have accomplished for us." It was the first of only three such titles given by the emperor to cities in New Spain. This direct recognition by the emperor of the indigenous noblemen of Tlaxcala went on to determine the course of Tlaxcalan history, as the indigenous province ...
Contributed by
Center for the Study of the History of Mexico CARSO
Royal Museum, the Court (i.e. Bargello Museum, the Courtyard), Florence, Italy
This photochrome print of the court of the Royal Museum in Florence is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of the building, which was intended to be a palace, began in 1255, based on a design by the architect Lapo Tedesco (died circa 1280). From the late 13th century to the early 16th century, the building was known as the Palazzo del Popolo (Palace of the People), and was home to the podestà, or the city ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Exlibris
Wolfgangus Lazius is the Latinized name of Wolfgang Laz (1514–65), an Austrian humanist, historian, cartographer, and physician who produced the first set of maps of the hereditary lands of the Austrian crown. Lazius was professor of medicine on the faculty of the University of Vienna, where he was several times dean and rector. Emperor Ferdinand I appointed him his personal physician, historiographer, and adviser, as well as curator of the imperial collections. Like many 16th century scholars trained in the sciences, Lazius was drawn to the emerging art of ...
Contributed by
Austrian National Library
Kingdom of Poland
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts the Kingdom of Poland, located in part of present-day Poland, and bordered by Prussia to the northwest and the Austrian Empire to the south. Poland lost ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Courland Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Courland Province , located in part of present-day Latvia, and bordered by the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga. Russia acquired the territory of Courland Province ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Lifland Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Lifland Province, located in the western part of the empire, and bordered by the Gulf of Riga to the west and Lake Chudskoe to the east ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Tomsk Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Tomsk Province, located in the south-central part of the empire. Tomsk, the administrative center of the province, is situated on the Tom' River above its confluence ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Vitebsk Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Vitebsk Province, part of present-day Belarus. Russia acquired the territory of Vitebsk Province after the first partition of Poland in 1772. Vitebsk (Vitsyebsk, in Belarusian), the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Minsk Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Minsk Province, located in the western part of the empire. In the south, the Pripiat (Prypyats’, in Belarusian) River, a tributary of the Dnieper (Dnyapro, in ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Ekaterinoslav Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Ekaterinoslav Province, located in the western part of the empire, in present-day Ukraine. To the south, the province borders on the Sea of Azov. Ekaterinoslav (present-day ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Caucasus Oblast
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts the Caucasus Oblast, located in the southwestern part of the empire and bordered by the Azov, Black, and Caspian seas. The map marks the “Land of ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Yakutsk Region
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts the Yakutsk region, located in the far east of the empire. The region is bordered by the “North Ocean or Arctic Sea” (present-day Arctic Ocean) to ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Kostroma Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Kostroma Province, located in the western part of the empire. Kostroma is situated at the confluence of the Volga and Kostroma rivers. Founded in 1152, Kostroma ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Mogilev Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Mogilev Province, located in part of present-day Belarus. The province was acquired by Russia in 1772 after the first partition of Poland. Mogilev (Mahilyow, in Belarusian ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Omsk Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Omsk Province, located in the west-central part of the empire. The province borders China to the southeast, and the “Land of the Kazakhs” (part of the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Arkhangelsk Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Arkhangelsk Province, located in the far north of European Russia, and bordered by the White, Barents, and Kara seas. Arkhangel'sk, the administrative center of the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Grand Duchy of Finland
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts the Grand Duchy of Finland, located in part of present-day Finland. The Grand Duchy of Finland bordered on the Kingdom of Sweden and the Gulf of ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Chernigov Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Chernigov Province, part of present-day Ukraine. The western border of the province is marked by the Dnieper River. Chernigov, the administrative center of the province, is ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Orenburg Province
This early-19th century playing card is from a set of 60 such cards, each devoted to a different province or territory of the Russian Empire, which at the time included the Grand Duchy of Finland, Congress Poland, and Russian America. One side of each card shows the local costume and the provincial coat of arms; the other side contains a map. This card depicts Orenburg Province, located in the southwestern part of the empire. The province borders the “steppe of the nomad Kirgiz,” part of present-day Kazakhstan. Ufa, the administrative ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia