17 results in English
Map of the South River in New Netherland
Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was employed by the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Maior. This pen-and-ink and watercolor map ...
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Brief and Concise Plan Intended to be a Mutual Agreement for Some Colonists Willing to go to the South River in New Netherland
Pieter Cornelis Plockhoy was a Dutch Mennonite and social reformer, born in the city of Zierikzee circa 1625. He moved to Amsterdam in 1648, where he became well known in the city’s intellectual circles. In 1658 he went to London where he tried unsuccessfully to gain the support of Oliver Cromwell, the antiroyalist Lord Protector of the Commonwealth, for the establishment of utopian settlements in England. Plockhoy returned to Netherlands in 1661 and in 1662 concluded a contract with the Amsterdam magistrates for the establishment of a settlement on ...
Short Story about New Netherland [...] and Special Possibilities to Populate
This pamphlet, published anonymously in Amsterdam in October 1662, concerns the establishment of a settlement on the South River (as the Dutch called the Delaware River) in New Netherland by the Dutch Mennonite and social reformer Pieter Cornelis Plockhoy. The pamphlet consisted of proposals sent to the magistrates of the city of Amsterdam to gain their support for the settlement, which Plockhoy intended to be for poor and needy families and based on reformist principles. The pamphlet was partly intended to reassure investors that the settlement would also be a ...
Philadelphia Citizen's Line of Steam Boats to New York and Baltimore
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the terminal of the Citizens Line of steamboats, located at the end of Arch Street on the Delaware River in Philadelphia. The steamboat is lying low in the river, and passengers are seen coming and going on Arch Street. The company office is in the left foreground. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration ...
View of the Glass Works of T.W. Dyott at Kensington on the Delaware, near Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the glass works owned by T.W. Dyott at Kensington on the Delaware River near Philadelphia. Ships are visible on the river, and smoke is rising from the chimneys of these early industrial buildings. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes ...
Philadelphia from the Navy Yard
The shipyard at Front Street on the Delaware River in the Southwark section of Philadelphia became operational in 1776. In 1801 it became the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and the first official base of the United States Navy. The larger ironclad warships introduced into the navy after the American Civil War required more space, and in 1871 the shipyard moved to League Island at the confluence of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers. This print by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804−46) shows the Delaware bustling with an assortment of vessels, including ...
Philadelphia, from the State House Steeple, North, East and South
This lithograph is by Leo von Elliot (1816−90) after a sketch by Joseph Thoma. Little is known about either of these artists. The panoramic view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century looks east toward the Delaware River, predominantly showing the area east of Fifth Street between Arch and South Streets from the State House (Independence Hall). It includes the Court House (later City Hall, 500 Chestnut Street) and the Philadelphia Library (the Library Company of Philadelphia, 105 South Fifth Street). Also seen are a flag flying on top of ...
H.P. & W.C. Taylor, Perfumers
This advertisement for the Philadelphia firm of H.P. & W.C. Taylor, Perfumers, portrays aspects of industry, transportation, and marketing in mid-19th century America. The central image shows a shipping scene at a pier above the Navy Yard on the Delaware River. Laborers are seen loading a ship with goods from a pier on which a horse-drawn wagon and cart are surrounded by crates. Members of the ship’s crew line the deck of the steamer, and a barge is moored near the pier. On the dock, a horse-drawn coach ...
Penn Steam Engine and Boiler Works. Foot of Palmer Street, Kensington, Philadelphia. Reaney, Neafie and Company Engineers, Machinists, Boiler Makers, Black Smiths and Founders
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows vessels docked in front of the engine and boiler works complex at the foot of Palmer Street on the busy Delaware River. Teams of several horses haul materials on trucks past the boiler works. Laborers work on the docks, piers, and boats at the complex. Docked vessels include the tugboats, steamboats, paddleboats, and a sailboat. The firm was established as Reaney, Neafie & Smith in ...
Rowley, Ashburner and Company's Oil, Alcohol, Fluid and Pine Oil Works. Kensington Screw Dock, Penn Street above Maiden, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Kensington Screw Dock on North Penn Street above Maiden Street (later Laurel Street) from the Delaware River. Shipwrights work on the hull of a square-rigged ship raised in the dry dock in front of the firm's building. At the wharf, horse-drawn drays travel past the neighboring oil manufactory and distillery and a captain, with a dog, leans on a hitching post to ...
A View of Point Airy Opposite South Street, Philadelphia
Louis (or Lewis) Haugg was born in 1827 in Germany, immigrated to the United States in 1847, and worked as a lithographic artist and printer in Philadelphia circa 1855−1900. This advertisement shows the Point Airy Hotel and dock operated by David Warren at the resort located on the southern end of Windmill Island, a summer resort area popular in the 19th century before the removal of the island in 1897 to allow passage for larger ships on the Delaware River. Trees surround the resort. In the foreground, a wide ...
Conflagration of the Steam Boat New Jersey on the Delaware River Opposite Philadelphia, March 15, 1856, in Which 50 Persons Lost Their Lives
George G. Heiss was a mid-19th century Philadelphia lithographer, who specialized in views of fire-fighting equipment. This lithograph shows, in the distance under the winter night sky, clouds of smoke rising from the Philadelphia and Camden Ferry Company steamboat New Jersey as rowboats race to the wreck. In the right of the image, a partial view of the ferry Dido traveling to the rescue is visible. The New Jersey caught fire as the result of defective boilers while in mid-voyage to Camden from Philadelphia via an alternate elongated route necessitated ...
Souvenir of the Coldest Winter on Record. Scene on the Delaware River at Philadelphia during the Severe Winter of 1856
In the mid-19th century, the winter of 1856 was known as the coldest on record. This genre scene from Philadelphia shows hundreds of persons skating and sledding on the frozen Delaware River in front of the old Navy Yard at Southwark. The participants include men pushing women in chairs with blades, men pushing a sleigh of women passengers, a man pulling a boy on a sled, and a man being pulled by a dog running through a crowd of skaters. In the foreground, a couple stands and watches; a woman ...
Panorama of Philadelphia from the State House Steeple. South
This print is a panoramic view of Philadelphia as seen looking south toward the Delaware River from the State House (Independence Hall) steeple. The area of the city shown is mainly between Independence Square, the river, and about 8th Street. The numbered key indicates seven landmarks visible in the print: (1) the Navy Yard at Southwark; (2) Shot Tower; (3) Philadelphia Prison, i.e., Moyamensing Prison; (4) Albert Barnes Church, i.e., First Presbyterian Church; (5) Pennsylvania Hospital; (6) Washington Square, between Sixth, Eighth, Walnut, and Spruce Streets; and (7 ...
Shad Fishing (Taking up the Net)
This print shows shad fishermen working near Philadelphia, across the Delaware River from New Jersey. Several of the men are African American. They stand waist deep in the river, gathering up their catch into a rowboat. Visible in the foreground and background are residential buildings and a local church, a Philadelphia pier, the mills of Gloucester, New Jersey, and sailboats on the river. The print is by James Fuller Queen, a Philadelphia lithographer and pioneer chromolithographer known for his attention to detail who produced many views of the city.
Bird’s-Eye View of Property on Alleghany Avenue, Philadelphia, 25th Ward
This print shows a bird's eye view of the grid plan of the city of Philadelphia, looking southeast from Frankford Road in northeast Philadelphia toward the Delaware River. The area depicted lies between Westmoreland Street and a few blocks south of Columbia Street, consisting mainly of the open land surrounding the Aramingo Canal, the Reading Railroad depot between Lehigh Avenue and Somerset Street, and the tracks of the Philadelphia, Trenton, and New York Railroad line. A few dwellings, churches, and other structures comprise the landscape, with a heavier concentration ...
A Plan of the City and Environs of Philadelphia, 1777
This map of Philadelphia was published in London in 1777 by William Faden, successor to Thomas Jefferys as royal geographer to King George III. It is based on a 1752 map prepared by Nicholas Scull (circa 1687–1762) and George Heap (flourished 1715–60), updated with new details. An important addition to the 1777 map is the shading to indicate the expansion of the city from the waterfront along the Delaware River. One of the largest and most prosperous cities in mid-18th century British North America, Philadelphia was laid out ...
Contributed by Library of Congress