21 results in English
Circus Midway Scene
This 1935 photograph shows a crowd gathering on the midway of the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus, heading towards the entrance marquee tent. On the left is the painted banner line depicting freaks and attractions in the sideshow, an added fee attraction operating before the main show. On the right can be seen concession tents and ticket wagons. Visible behind the marquee entrance is the “free” menagerie tent consisting of the exhibition of exotic caged animals, elephants, and other lead stock. By the 1930s, the midway had become an important part of the ...
Contributed by Circus World Museum
Cole Bros. Circus
This 1935 image presents a scene from a typical moderate-sized 20th-century American circus. A crowd watches as baggage wagons from the Cole Bros. Circus are being pulled over flatcars. The railcars are marked Clyde Beatty and Allen King, who were two of the more notable animal trainers of the period. Behind the flatcars are stock cars that held elephants and baggage horses. This scene was repeated daily, morning and night, in railroad yards in communities across the United States. Cole Bros. Circus was established in 1884 by William Washington Cole ...
Contributed by Circus World Museum
Ringling Bros. World’s Greatest Shows
This colorful lithograph advertising the Ringling Bros. Circus was printed by the Strobridge Lithographing Company of Cincinnati, Ohio, and New York, a significant producer of circus posters. The poster depicts the immense size of a large American circus in the early part of the 20th century and is an example of the colorful, eye-catching advertisements commonly used by circuses to attract crowds. The texts at the bottom proclaim “A Magic Moving City of Tents, The Home of Many Marvels, Largest Show Ever Perfected. A Really Great World’s Exposition,” and ...
Contributed by Circus World Museum
Church of St. Alexander Nevskii (Late 17th Century), Northwest View, Vologda, Russia
This northwest view of the Church of Saint Alexander Nevskii in Vologda was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the most important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century. A rich center of medieval Russian culture, Vologda has numerous churches ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Midwinter Crowd at Miami Beach
Winter tourism became a major factor in the development of Miami and south Florida from the 1920s onward. Development, particularly of hotels, grew apace, with the increasing popularity of this tourism and retirement haven, and much helped by the spread of commercial aviation. By 1940 Miami had about two million vacationers a year. President Harry S Truman was there for the dedication of the Everglades National Park in 1947. Some of the new hotels, such as the 1948 Sherry Frontenac, had fine Art Deco details. This photograph, taken on December ...
Concert in St. Mark's Place, Venice, Italy
This photochrome print of Saint Mark’s Square (Piazza San Marco) in Venice is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The basilica, shown here, was originally built in 832, shortly after the remains of Saint Mark the Evangelist, the patron saint of Venice, were said to have been brought to the city from Alexandria, Egypt by two Venetian merchants. The church was destroyed in a fire, rebuilt at the end of the 10th century, and again in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Country Store, Venezuela
This photograph, taken by an unknown photographer in Venezuela some time between 1900 and 1906, is from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them by photolithography. This process permitted the mass production of color postcards, prints, and albums ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View from the Bell Tower of the Trinity Cathedral (of the Trinity Monastery) on Cathedral Square in Belgorod, during the Celebration of the Canonization of Ioasaf of Belgorod, September 4, 1911
This photograph of a solemn procession in honor of the canonization of the Ioasaf Belgorodskii was taken in September 1911, in the city of Belgorod. Born Ioakim Andreevich Gorlenko on September 8 (19), 1705, to parents of distinguished Cossack lineage, Ioasaf of Belgorod entered the Kiev Spiritual Academy in 1713 and accepted the monastic calling in 1727. In 1744 he was bestowed the title “Archimandrite” by Empress Elizabeth and served at the Trinity Lavra of Saint Sergius (monastery) near Moscow. In 1748 he became Bishop of Belgorod and Oboyan. After ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
People Celebrating Shaykh Zayed's Wedding
This 1962 photograph shows people gathering in Al-Ain to celebrate the wedding of Shaykh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan (1918–2004) to Shaykhah Fatima bint Mubarak Al Ketbi. Shaykh Zayed became the ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1966. Al-Ain is a desert oasis located approximately 160 kilometers east of the city of Abu Dhabi in the emirate of Abu Dhabi. As the leader of Abu Dhabi, Shaykh Zayed carried out a program to develop Al-Ain through extensive investments in irrigation, reclamation of desert land, and the construction of roads and ...
Disembarking from a Ship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers, and meeting and greeting people on the quay, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to Algiers, and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Disembarking from a Ship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers, and being helped into small boats for transfer to shore, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Beggars in front of the Mosque “Sidi Abderrhaman,” Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Mosque of Sidi Abderrahman in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The mosque was built in 1696 and dedicated to the learned marabout (holy man or mystic) Sidi Abderrahman (circa 1387–1468). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers told tourists that the mosque “has no attraction beyond its elegant minaret, adorned with coloured tiles; but its situation near the Jardin Marengo, and the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Market, Biskra, Algeria
This photochrome print of a market in Biskra, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the northern edge of the Sahara, the town goes back at least to the time of the Romans, who valued the health-giving properties of the sulfur springs in the area and built a small fortification, which they called Vescera, close to the nearby oases. The French garrisoned the town in 1844 and constructed its modern parts. The 1911 edition of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Arab Juggler, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of an Arab juggler performing for a crowd in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described the old city of Algiers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life.” Arabs were the dominant group in the population, then as now, but many of the people were Berbers or from other Mahgribi population groups. The city had been ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kara-Keui (Galata) Bridge, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Galata Bridge spanning the Golden Horn on the western side of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the bridge, which links the Stambul and Galata districts of the city, was “originally built of timber in 1845, and called Sultan Valideh Bridge after its founder (the ‘sultan’s mother’), and was rebuilt in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kara-Keui (Galata) and View of Pera, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the neighborhood of Kara-Keui (Galata) in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) with a view of Pera is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). One theory, among others, is that the name Galata derives from the Italian term calata (descent), which would be fitting for the neighborhood of steep streets with many stairs sloping down to the Golden Horn. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers states that Pera ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Amir. A Dogcart Drive
This pencil drawing by Melton Prior (1845–1910) was published in the Illustrated London News on January 21, 1905 under the title “The Amir’s favour for English ways: A dog-cart drive, one of his Highness’s favourite pastimes.” According to the caption, the artist created the picture from material supplied by an official in the service of the amir, Habibullah Khan (born 1872), the ruler of Afghanistan from 1901 until his death in 1919. In this drawing, the amir is shown driving down a street with an escort of ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
Destruction by Fire of Pennsylvania Hall. On the Night of the 17th May, 1838
This dramatic print shows the destruction of Pennsylvania Hall, a large building that was constructed in 1837–38 at Sixth and Haines Streets in Philadelphia as a meeting place for local abolitionist (antislavery) groups. Dedication ceremonies began on May 14, 1838, and continued over several days in a climate of growing hostility from anti-abolitionist forces in the city. On the night of May 17, 1838, an anti-abolitionist mob stormed the hall and set it on fire. Fire companies refused to fight the blaze, and the building was completely destroyed. A ...
Market Street, from Front Street
This lithograph shows the active, business-lined street containing the New Jersey Market terminus in Philadelphia, named after its central location to the ferries from New Jersey, the city's main provider of farm produce. Market shoppers, purveyors of goods, and pedestrians, including African Americans, stroll the streets and sidewalks and pack the market shed topped with a cupola and clock. Peddlers sell their goods from carts on Front Street. Built in 1822, the market operated twice weekly until the abolition of street markets in 1859. A bell on Front Street ...
Souvenir of the Coldest Winter on Record. Scene on the Delaware River at Philadelphia during the Severe Winter of 1856
In the mid-19th century, the winter of 1856 was known as the coldest on record. This genre scene from Philadelphia shows hundreds of persons skating and sledding on the frozen Delaware River in front of the old Navy Yard at Southwark. The participants include men pushing women in chairs with blades, men pushing a sleigh of women passengers, a man pulling a boy on a sled, and a man being pulled by a dog running through a crowd of skaters. In the foreground, a couple stands and watches; a woman ...
Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, of Philadelphia
This print is a lively scene from November 1863 containing a view of the two hospitals, refreshment stand, and other buildings of the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon located near the Navy Yard at Swanson and Washington Avenues in Philadelphia during the American Civil War. Situated at the transportation hub between the North and the South on land leased for free from the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad, the saloon was a volunteer relief agency that provided meals, hospital care, washing, sleeping, and writing facilities to military personnel, refugees, and freedmen. It ...