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Courtyard of Wali Sher Ali Khan's Zenana, by Sir Benjamin Simpson
This photograph of the ornately decorated courtyard of a palace in Kandahar is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The photograph most likely was taken during the British occupation of Kandahar, which lasted from September 1880 to April 1881. It shows the exterior of the zenana, the women’s quarters of the palace of Sher Ali Khan, who was amir of Afghanistan for most of the period 1863–79. Sher Ali Khan was the son of Dōst Moḥammad Khān ...
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Library of Congress
Courtyard of the Tuileries
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
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National Library of Brazil
Place Vendôme, Ministry of Justice Courtyard. (Supper Time)
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
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National Library of Brazil
Palace of the Legion of Honor, Inner Courtyard
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
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National Library of Brazil
Consignments Fund (Courtyard)
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
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National Library of Brazil
Antiquities of Samarkand. Madrasah of Tillia Kari. Inner Courtyard (Northern Side). View of the Large Middle Niche
This photograph of the north wall of the courtyard of the Tillia Kari Madrasah in Samarkand (Uzbekistan) is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s Islamic architecture, such as 14th- and 15th-century monuments from the reign of Timur (Tamerlane) and his successors. In the center of Samarkand is the ...
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Library of Congress
Royal Museum, the Court (i.e. Bargello Museum, the Courtyard), Florence, Italy
This photochrome print of the court of the Royal Museum in Florence is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Construction of the building, which was intended to be a palace, began in 1255, based on a design by the architect Lapo Tedesco (died circa 1280). From the late 13th century to the early 16th century, the building was known as the Palazzo del Popolo (Palace of the People), and was home to the podestà, or the city ...
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Library of Congress
Mugan. Settler's Courtyard. Ovens for Preparing Food in the Courtyard
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Chapel on the Site Where Mikhail Nikitich Romanov Was Imprisoned. View from the East. The Village of Nyrob. Ural
The historic settlement of Nyrob in the northern Urals is 40 kilometers to the north of the regional center of Cherdyn’. Mentioned in written sources as early as 1579, Nyrob became known as a place of exile. It was there, in 1601, that Tsar Boris Godunov exiled Mikhail Nikitich Romanov, uncle of Mikhail Fedorovich Romanov, who in 1613 became the first tsar of the Romanov dynasty. The death of the elder Romanov in 1602, caused by harsh treatment while in captivity, endowed the site with special significance for the Romanovs ...
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Library of Congress
Same Chapel on the Site Where Mikhail Nikitich Romanov Was Imprisoned, View from the Southeast. The Village of Nyrob. Ural
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Same Chapel on the Site Where Mikhail Nikitich Romanov Was Imprisoned. View from the West. The Village of Nyrob. Ural
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Inside Shir-Dar Mosque. Samarkand
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The second madrasah is the Shir-Dar, was built in 1619–36 during the Bukhara Astrakhanid dynasty. Rectangular in plan, the two-story arcaded structure contained scholars’ cells along an interior courtyard. This view shows the northwest corner of the yard, with a ribbed dome over an instruction hall. Despite losses in this active seismic zone, the surface displays profuse ceramic decoration that includes geometric and botanical motifs, as well as a vertical Perso-Arabic inscription band. Visible ...
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Library of Congress
View of Samarkand from Tillia Kari
In the center of Samarkand is the Registan complex, consisting of three madrasah (religious schools). The third of these, the Tillia Kari Madrasah, was built in 1646–60 on the site of a former caravansarai. Its plan is formed by a rectangular courtyard, bounded by arcades that contain rooms for scholars. This view, taken from the two-story main facade, looks in the opposite direction from the square toward the adobe houses in the city. On the left is one of the four iwan arches that define the main axes of ...
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Library of Congress
Bibi-Khanym Mosque. Samarkand
The Bibi Khanym complex in Samarkand was built in 1399–1405 with the spoils of Timur’s (Tamerlane’s) campaign in India. Bibi Khanym was named in homage to Timur’s senior wife, Sarai Mulk Khanym. The rectangular courtyard centers on the Main, or Friday, Mosque, which is flanked by two enormous polygonal minarets. This view shows a portion of the left minaret and adjacent wall. Despite severe damage, resulting from an earthquake in 1897, much of the ceramic ornamentation remains. The surface of the tower shaft is composed of ...
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Library of Congress
In the Courtyard of a Sart Home. On the Outskirts of Samarkand
The caption identifies this house as belonging to a Sart, a term used in the previous century to refer to town dwellers, as well as to inhabitants of this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. This courtyard view of a suburban villa shows elements of Western construction in the brickwork, the window design, and the roof cornice. Also prominent are traditional decorative elements, such as the wooden columns that support the cornice and the ceramic panels above the French doors. Although not identified, the owner ...
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Library of Congress
Sacred Well inside Courtyard in Bogoeddin. Bukhara
This richly detailed winter photograph shows a courtyard at the complex containing the tomb of Sheikh Bakhauddin Nakshbandi (1318–89), a venerated sage of the Sufi Nakshbandi order. In 1544 Bakhauddin’s burial site at Baha al-Din, near Bukhara (in present-day Uzbekistan), was enshrined within a large khanaka (memorial structure). Mosques and a minaret were added in the 18th and 19th centuries. Seen here is a well covered by a miniature structure with domed columns at the corners. On the facades are remnants of ceramic tiles with star motifs, while ...
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Library of Congress
Study. In the Courtyard of the Church of the Resurrection. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Exit from the Gur-Emir Mosque. Samarkand
Among Samarkand’s major monuments is Gur-Emir ("tomb of the ruler"), the burial place of the great Timur (Tamerlane). Timur began the shrine in 1403 in memory of his beloved grandson Muhammad Sultan. Following Timur's own death from pneumonia in 1405, his body was also placed in the structure, which became the mausoleum of the Timurids. This winter view shows the entrance structure facing the mausoleum. Although much damaged, the facades retain fragments of polychrome ceramic ornamentation, including a vertical strip of rosette tiles, geometric and floral motifs, and ...
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Library of Congress
Man Sitting in Courtyard. Arched Tower in Background
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Man in Courtyard
This man with a turban and brightly colored robe is probably a pilgrim. In his right hand he holds a green tubeteika (traditional Central Asian cap), while under his left arm is a folded red mat. In the background is an adobe structure that appears to be a modest khanaka (hostel for pilgrims), of which there were many in Bukhara. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early ...
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Library of Congress
View of a Courtyard, Adobe Buildings, and a Bird's Nest Atop a Dome
Cotton was an essential raw material for the large textile mills of the Russian Empire, which underwent rapid industrialization in the late 19th-early 20th century. Russian authorities made concerted efforts to find sufficiently warm areas in the empire for the cultivation of this crop. This photograph shows machines and vats for the production of cottonseed oil at the estate of Murgab near Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan). The Murgab Oasis and the city of Merv (now Mary) were incorporated into the Russian Empire through negotiations in 1884. The oasis takes its name ...
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Library of Congress