9 results in English
Immigrant's Home, Argentina
This photograph of an immigrant’s home in Argentina is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Shibaura
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) was a prolific artist and woodblock printer ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
English Village Scene
This World War I poster, commissioned by the London subway authority, features an idyllic English village scene and the text of the poem “A Wish” by Samuel Rogers that paint an idealized picture of English country life. The caption reads: “The Underground Railways of London, knowing how many of their passengers are now engaged on important business in France and other parts of the world, send out this reminder of home. Thanks are due to George Clausen, R.A. for the drawing.” The contrast between the English idyll and the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Thatched Roof Building in Palm Grove with People Gathered Around Trees and Building
Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands was the scene of the first post-World War II atomic tests, carried out by the United States to determine the effects of nuclear weapons on naval ships. This photograph, part of the record of the operation made by the U.S. Army Air Forces, shows inhabitants of the island gathered around a thatched-roof building in a palm grove. Before the tests, all 167 residents of Bikini were evacuated from their home island. Because of the high levels of radiation caused by the explosions over ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Thatched Roof Building Shaded by Palm Trees with People Standing at Entrance
Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands was the scene of the first post-World War II atomic tests, carried out by the United States to determine the effects of nuclear weapons on naval ships. This photograph, part of the record of the operation made by the U.S. Army Air Forces, shows people looking out from a typical thatched-roof building on Bikini. Before the tests, all 167 residents of Bikini were evacuated from their home island. Because of the high levels of radiation caused by the explosions over Bikini, neither they ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Story of My Childhood
Clara Barton, the popular name of Clarissa Harlowe Barton (1821–1912), is best known as the founder of the American Red Cross. She worked as a schoolteacher from 1836 to 1854 and later as a copyist in the U.S. Patent Office in Washington, DC. During the American Civil War, she organized relief for wounded soldiers and became known as the “Angel of the Battlefield.” She later worked for the International Red Cross during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71. She established the U.S. branch of the Red Cross ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Eight Sights in the Environs of Edo
This work is a series of nishiki-e (Japanese multicolored woodblock prints) that depict eight scenic spots around Edo (present-day Tokyo). The series, dating from about 1838, is one of the greatest artistic masterpieces from among the many woodblock prints of Utawaga Hiroshige I (1797–1858). The work consists of: Azuma no mori yau (Night rain at Azuma no mori); Haneda rakugan (Wild geese alighting at Haneda); Gyōtoku kihan (Returning sailboats near Gyōtoku); Sibaura seiran (Mountain vapor at Shibaura); Ikegami banshō (Evening bell at Ikegami); Koganei-bashi sekisho (Evening glow at Koganei-bashi ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Rural Pennsylvania
Katherine Milhous (1894–1977) was a newspaper illustrator and book designer of Pennsylvania Dutch heritage. She attended the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. During the Depression of the 1930s, she was employed as an artist for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program and produced a colorful series of posters representing rural Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Poster of an Amish Family, Pennsylvania
Katherine Milhous (1894–1977) was a newspaper illustrator and book designer of Pennsylvania Dutch heritage. She attended the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. During the Depression of the 1930s, she was employed as an artist for the Work Projects Administration (WPA) Federal Art Program and produced a colorful series of posters representing rural Pennsylvania. One of the New Deal programs launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to combat unemployment, in 1936–43 the WPA supported the creation of more than 2,000 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress