7 results in English
The Ash Wednesday Supper
La cena de le Ceneri (The Ash Wednesday supper), the first of Giordano Bruno’s six Italian philosophical dialogues, was first published in London in 1584. The title page indicates neither the place of publication nor the publisher, but scholars agree that the book was printed at the London shop of John Charlewood. The work is dedicated to the French ambassador to the English court, Michel de Castelnau, sieur de la Mauvissière, who assisted Bruno after his arrival in London in 1583. The book is divided into five dialogues and ...
Boethius’s “Commentaries on Cicero's ‘Topics’” and Other Astronomical Treatises
This miscellany contains the following works: Commentarii in Ciceronis Topica (Commentaries on Cicero's “Topics”), by Boethius; the famous Somnium Scipionis (ex libris VI De re publica) (The dream of Scipio, book six from “The Republic”), by Cicero; Commentarii in Ciceronis Somnium Scipionis (Commentaries on Cicero’s “The Dream of Scipio”), by Macrobius; Naturalis historia, ex libris II (excerpta Eboracensia) (Natural history, Book two with York excerpts), by Pliny the Elder; and Epistola de ratione horologii (Letter on time reckoning). In the Middle Ages, the commentary by Macrobius, a late-Roman ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
"Of the Nature of Things" and "Of the Times" by Bede. Letters by Saint Jerome and Pseudo-Jerome. Allegorical Drawings with Commentary and Glosses
This manuscript contains two works on computus (computations) by the Anglo-Saxon scholar the Venerable Bede (673−735), De natura rerum (Of the nature of things) and De temporum ratione (Of the times), and letters by Saint Jerome and Pseudo-Jerome. On a page originally left blank, folio 63 recto, pen drawings were entered towards the end of the 11th century. Their motifs are monsters, composed of parts of different animals: the upper creature consists of a bird's head with donkey ears, the tail of a dragon ending in a peacock ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
The Luminance of Explication and Mysteries of Proof in the Understanding of the Paradigms of the Science of Weights and Measures. Part One
This manuscript consists of the first part of Anwār al-bayān wa asrār al-burhān fī fahm awzān ʻilm al-mīzān (The luminance of explication and mysteries of proof in the understanding of the paradigms of the science of weights and measures). It was composed by the Persian alchemist Aidamur ibn ʻAli ibn Aidamur al-Jaldaki (also seen as al-Gildaki, died circa 1342). The author's name indicates that he was born in Jaldak, in present-day Afghanistan. Over the course of 17 years, al-Jaldaki traveled to Iraq, Asia Minor, West Africa, Egypt, Yemen, Hejaz ...
Contributed by Wellcome Library
On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres
De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the revolutions of the heavenly spheres), written by Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus (1473–1543) and published just before his death, placed the sun at the center of the universe and argued that the Earth moved across the heavens as one of the planets. Copernicus anticipated his ideas would be controversial and waited more than 30 years to publish his book. De Revolutionibus opens with a brief argument for the heliocentric universe and follows with an extensive set of mathematical proofs and astronomical tables. Copernicus was ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
On Aristotle’s “On the Heavens”
In collaboration with the Chinese scholar Li Zhizao (1565–1630), Portuguese missionary Fu Fanji (Francisco Furtado, 1587–1653) translated two Western works into Chinese. They were Huan you quan (On heaven and Earth), a translation with scholarly commentaries of Aristotle’s De Coelo et Mundo, and Ming li tan (Inquiries into the principles of names), a partial free translation of Aristotelian logic. A work of cosmology rather than of religion, the first book originally was a part of the eight-volume Commentarii Collegii Conimbrincensis Societatis Iesu, in quator libros De Coelo ...
Contributed by National Central Library
The Meccan Revelations
Muḥyiddin ibn Arabi (1165–1240 AD, 560–638 AH), also known as al-Shaykh al-Akbar (the Great Shaykh), was a Muslim mystic and philosopher of Andalusian origin. He was born in Murcia but his family later moved to Seville. Ibn Arabi’s life was divided almost equally between West and East. After traveling extensively in North Africa, he embarked on a spiritual journey from his native Spain. He arrived in Mecca in 1202, where he spent three years. He then spent years traveling in Syria, Palestine, Iraq, and Turkey. He died ...
Contributed by Bibliotheca Alexandrina