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Images from Mecca
Bilder aus Mecca (Images from Mecca) by the Dutch orientalist Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857–1936) is one of the earliest works by a non-Arab to document Mecca and the hajj in photographs. Hurgronje studied at Leiden University, where he earned a doctorate in Semitic languages and literature with a dissertation on Mecca and the pilgrim rituals and their historical background. He became a teacher at the Leiden training college for East Indian officials. In 1884–85 he was granted a leave of absence to go to Jeddah and Mecca to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Mosque, While Congregational Salat Are Being Held inside
This rare photograph is from Bilder aus Mecca (Images from Mecca), an album by the Dutch orientalist Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857–1936) that is one of the earliest works by a non-Arab to document Mecca and the hajj in photographs. Hurgronje studied at Leiden University, where he earned a doctorate in Semitic languages and literature with a dissertation on Mecca and the pilgrim rituals and their historical background. He became a teacher at the Leiden training college for East Indian officials. In 1884–85 he was granted a leave of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
First View of the City of Mecca: Left in the Background Is the Rampart of Jiyād. The Big Building to the Right Is the Ḥamīdiyyah, Nearby to the Left Is the Printing House
This rare photograph is from Bilder aus Mecca (Images from Mecca), an album by the Dutch orientalist Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857–1936) that is one of the earliest works by a non-Arab to document Mecca and the hajj in photographs. Hurgronje studied at Leiden University, where he earned a doctorate in Semitic languages and literature with a dissertation on Mecca and the pilgrim rituals and their historical background. He became a teacher at the Leiden training college for East Indian officials. In 1884–85 he was granted a leave of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Second View of the City of Mecca over the Northwest (Right) and Southwest (Left) Side of the Mosque
This rare photograph is from Bilder aus Mecca (Images from Mecca), an album by the Dutch orientalist Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857–1936) that is one of the earliest works by a non-Arab to document Mecca and the hajj in photographs. Hurgronje studied at Leiden University, where he earned a doctorate in Semitic languages and literature with a dissertation on Mecca and the pilgrim rituals and their historical background. He became a teacher at the Leiden training college for East Indian officials. In 1884–85 he was granted a leave of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Third View of the City of Mecca: Left Is the Northern Corner of the Mosque, a Bit to the Southeast of It Is the Bāb ès-salām, through Which Pilgrims Enter the Mosque
This rare photograph is from Bilder aus Mecca (Images from Mecca), an album by the Dutch orientalist Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857–1936) that is one of the earliest works by a non-Arab to document Mecca and the hajj in photographs. Hurgronje studied at Leiden University, where he earned a doctorate in Semitic languages and literature with a dissertation on Mecca and the pilgrim rituals and their historical background. He became a teacher at the Leiden training college for East Indian officials. In 1884–85 he was granted a leave of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Fourth View of the City of Mecca
This rare photograph is from Bilder aus Mecca (Images from Mecca), an album by the Dutch orientalist Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857–1936) that is one of the earliest works by a non-Arab to document Mecca and the hajj in photographs. Hurgronje studied at Leiden University, where he earned a doctorate in Semitic languages and literature with a dissertation on Mecca and the pilgrim rituals and their historical background. He became a teacher at the Leiden training college for East Indian officials. In 1884–85 he was granted a leave of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Rio de Janeiro: General View
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1862, the government of Spain under Queen Isabella II sent a team of naturalists to South America to collect objects for Spanish museums. The endeavor was known as ...
View of Beirut, Looking Towards Body of Water
This image by the firm of Maison Bonfils depicts the city of Beirut, Lebanon, sometime in the last third of the 19th century. Maison Bonfils was the extraordinarily prolific venture of French photographer Félix Bonfils (1831-85), his wife Marie-Lydie Cabanis Bonfils (1837-1918), and their son, Adrien Bonfils (1861-1928). The Bonfils moved to Beirut in 1867 and, over the next five decades, their firm produced one of the world's most important bodies of photographic work about the Middle East. Maison Bonfils was known for landscape photographs, panoramas, biblical scenes, and ...
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View of Tiflis from the Grounds of Saint David Church
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Aerial Panoramic View of Beirut
This image by the firm of Maison Bonfils depicts the city of Beirut, Lebanon, sometime in the last third of the 19th century. Maison Bonfils was the extraordinarily prolific venture of the French photographer Félix Bonfils (1831-85), his wife Marie-Lydie Cabanis Bonfils (1837-1918), and their son, Adrien Bonfils (1861-1928). The Bonfils moved to Beirut in 1867 and, over the next five decades, their firm produced one of the world's most important bodies of photographic work about the Middle East. Maison Bonfils was known for landscape photographs, panoramas, biblical scenes ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
From the West, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the town of Cetinje, the capital of Montenegro, an independent principality that separated from the Ottoman Empire in 1878. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Cetinje had 3,000 inhabitants at the time. “In some respects the place resembles a little German country town, but it has several distinctive features of its own. It may be seen in an hour, but a whole day ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View, Njegus, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a view from Njegus, characterized by Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900) as “the ancestral home of the reigning family and the cradle of the Montenegrin wars of independence.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sarajevo, Looking Toward Alifakovak, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print of Sarajevo is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Sarajevo “lies in a narrow valley watered by the Miljačka, at the foot and on the slopes of hills rising to a height of 5,250 ft. The numerous minarets and the little houses standing in gardens give the town ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sarajevo, Bendbasi, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is from “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the village of Bendbasi, located to the east of Sarajevo. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Damascus. The Great Mosque and View of Damascus.
This photograph by the firm of Maison Bonfils depicts the Great Umayyad Mosque of Damascus (Jāmi' al-Umawī al-Kabīr) as it appeared in the late 19th century. Constructed in the eighth century on the site of earlier places of worship, the mosque is a site of spiritual significance to both Sunni and Shi’a Muslims. It also is said to house the head of John the Baptist. Maison Bonfils was the extraordinarily prolific venture of the French photographer Félix Bonfils (1831-85), his wife Marie-Lydie Cabanis Bonfils (1837-1918), and their son, Adrien ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cycloramic Birds-Eye Views of Belize, British Honduras
This panoramic photograph shows Belize City as it appeared around 1914. “Panoramic” photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This panoramic view is comprised of eight photographs spliced together to provide a broader image than would be practical with a single photograph. Belize was the main city and major port of the crown colony of British Honduras. The country changed its name to Belize in 1973 and became fully independent from Britain in 1981.
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Island and the City of Batavia Belonging to the Dutch, for the India Company
This hand-colored engraving of the Dutch colonial capital of Batavia (present-day Jakarta) was created by Jan Van Ryne in 1754. Van Ryne was born in the Netherlands, but spent most of his working life in London, where he specialized in producing engravings of scenes from the British and Dutch colonies. Located at the mouth of the Ciliwung River, Jakarta was the site of a settlement and port possibly going back as far as the fifth century A.D. In 1619, the Dutch captured and razed the existing city of Jayakerta ...
View of Sarajevo
Gyula (Julius) Háry (1864–1946) was a Hungarian painter and graphic artist, best known for his detailed watercolors of picturesque scenes in Austria-Hungary and Italy. He was born in Zalaegerszeg, in western Hungary, and studied art at the Budapest School for Applied Arts. Háry first went to Sarajevo, the capital and largest city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, in 1884, six years after control of the province was transferred from the Ottoman Empire to Austria-Hungary under the terms of the 1878 Treaty of Berlin. He made several return visits to Sarajevo ...
Contributed by Austrian National Library
Lima
This panoramic photograph of Lima, Peru, taken by an unknown photographer, probably dates from the 1870s. “Panoramic” photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This panoramic view is comprised of five photographs spliced together to provide a broader image than would be practical with a single photograph. Lima was founded by the Spanish explorer Francisco Pizarro in 1535. In the 16th and 17th centuries, it was the center of Spanish rule in South America. Today it is the largest city and capital of Peru.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Photo-Panoramic View of Constantinople
Hatchik “Christopher” Oscanyan (born 1818) was an author, diplomat, and publisher of the first Armenian-language newspaper in Constantinople. A native of Constantinople, Oscanyan was educated in New York City, to which he would later return as Ottoman consul-general. He energetically promoted the Ottoman Empire in a variety of media, including a London exhibition entitled the “Oriental and Turkish Museum” (1853), a popular book entitled The Sultan and His People (1887), and photographs such as this one. “Panoramic” photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panorama of Constantinople, Taken from the Galata Tower
The firm of Sébah & Joaillier was a partnership between Jean Pascal Sébah (son of the eminent Ottoman photographer Pascal Sébah) and the Frenchman Polycarpe Joaillier. The firm became official photographer to the Ottoman sultan and was responsible for an enormous number of photographs from throughout the Ottoman Empire. Panoramic photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view. This panorama, most likely taken in the late 1880s, is comprised of ten photographs spliced together to give the viewer a broader image than would have been practical ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, 1904
This panoramic photograph shows the city of Johnstown, Pennsylvania as it appeared in 1904, which was 15 years after the Johnstown Flood, also known as the Great Flood of 1889. On May 31 of that year, the South Fork Dam on Lake Conemaugh, located 23 kilometers upstream of the city, failed catastrophically, unleashing an enormous wave of water that completely destroyed much of downtown Johnstown. 2,209 people were killed, including 99 entire families. Led by Clara Barton, the American Red Cross organized help for the city in its first ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of Cincinnati, Ohio, Circa 1866
This panoramic photograph shows the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, as it appeared around 1866. Panoramic photography was developed in the mid-19th century, soon after the invention of photography, and was used to show wide overviews of cityscapes and landscapes. Making a panorama involved rotating a camera through successive exposures and then splicing the exposures together to produce a composite view. Some of the earliest panoramic photographs were made for the Union army during the Civil War to help military engineers analyze fortifications and terrain. Located on the north side of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress