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City Hall and Fire Tower (Mid-19th Century), Ustiuzhna, Russia
This view of the fire tower (kalancha) and town hall (gorodskaia duma) in Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Mologa River (a tributary of the Volga River), Ustiuzhna was known already in the mid-13th century for its rich deposits of bog iron, which led to its development as one of the earliest Russian centers of metalworking. Fire was a perennial scourge of ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Town Hall, Berne, Switzerland
This photochrome print of the town hall in Bern is part of “Views of Switzerland” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Baedeker’s Switzerland and the adjacent portions of Italy, Savoy, and Tyrol (1913) described the building as the “Rathaus or Cantonal Hall, erected in 1406-16 in the Burgundian late-Gothic style, with a modern facade approached by a covered flight of steps, and adorned with the arms of the Bernese districts.” This structure still serves as the seat of the cantonal Grand Council in Bern.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Views of Kiev
This early 20th-century album of postcards shows the major sites of Kiev, the capital of present-day Ukraine. The late-19th–early 20th century was a period of rapid industrialization in the Russian Empire, when Kiev grew into a major trade and transport center. Many of the city’s notable architectural monuments and educational and cultural institutions date from this period. The city’s electric tram system, the first in the Russian Empire, began operations in 1892 with the purchase of two electric-powered trams that replaced older, horse-drawn cars. The cable car ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
State House. Philadelphia
This lithographic print shows the State House (Independence Hall) on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets in Philadelphia. Completed in 1753, to designs by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton, it first served as the colonial legislature for Pennsylvania. The building is best known as the site where the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776. The Greek Revival facade shown here was added by architect John Haviland in 1830. The print is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804-46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, from the State House Steeple, North, East and South
This lithograph is by Leo von Elliot (1816−90) after a sketch by Joseph Thoma. Little is known about either of these artists. The panoramic view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century looks east toward the Delaware River, predominantly showing the area east of Fifth Street between Arch and South Streets from the State House (Independence Hall). It includes the Court House (later City Hall, 500 Chestnut Street) and the Philadelphia Library (the Library Company of Philadelphia, 105 South Fifth Street). Also seen are a flag flying on top of ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Panorama of Philadelphia from the State House Steeple. East
This print is a panoramic view of Philadelphia as seen looking east toward the Delaware River from the State House (Independence Hall) steeple. The area of the city shown is mainly east of Fifth Street between Arch and South Streets. The numbered key indicates 11 landmarks visible in the print: (1) the Court House, i.e. City Hall; (2) the Philadelphia Library, i.e., Library Company of Philadelphia; (3) United States Bank, i.e., Second Bank of the United States; (4) Philadelphia Bank; (5) Girard Bank; (6) Pennsylvania Bank; (7 ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia