10 results in English
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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The Wonderful Story of Uganda. To Which is Added the Story of Ham Mukasa, Told by Himself
The Wonderful Story of Uganda by the Reverend Joseph Dennis (J.D.) Mullins is an account of the mission to Uganda undertaken in the 1870s by the London-based Church Missionary Society (CMS) and the spread of Christianity in Uganda in the following decades. Mullins characterized the mission as “a Christian miracle of modern days. A nation situated in Central Africa, which twenty-five years ago had not received the Gospel, and had not even a written language, is to-day the home of thirty thousand Christians under Christian chiefs; its language has ...
Uganda in Transformation: 1876–1926
Herbert Gresford Jones (1870–1958) was an Anglican cleric and missionary to Uganda. He studied at Cambridge University and was ordained in 1895. After serving as a vicar at churches in England and as a chaplain with the British forces in World War I, he went to Uganda in 1920, where he was bishop suffragan of Kampala until 1923. Uganda in Transformation: 1876–1926 is Jones’s account of the development of the Anglican Church in Uganda since the arrival of the first British missionaries in 1877. In a series ...
Uganda by Pen and Camera
Charles William Hattersley (1866–1934) was a British missionary who joined the Church Missionary Society in early 1897 after having managed a cutlery works in Sheffield. In September of that year he left England for Uganda, where he helped to set up the system of primary education, was involved in educating the sons of Ugandan chiefs, and eventually served as headmaster of the Church Missionary Society school on Mengo Hill in Kampala. An enthusiastic amateur photographer, Hattersley became the official photographer to the Ugandan court and the church. His Uganda ...
Uganda's White Man of Work: A Story of Alexander M. Mackay
Uganda's White Man of Work: A Story of Alexander M. Mackay is a children’s biography of Alexander Murdoch Mackay (1849–90), a pioneering missionary to Uganda. In 1876 Mackay answered a call of the Church Missionary Society to go to Uganda after King Mutesa I of Buganda told the explorer Henry Morton Stanley of his interest in receiving Christian missionaries. Mackay spent nearly 14 years in Uganda. In addition to teaching the Christian gospel, he worked as a farmer, carpenter, bridge and road builder, schoolmaster, printer, and translator ...
A. M. Mackay: Pioneer Missionary of the Church Missionary Society to Uganda
Alexander Murdoch Mackay (1849–90) was a pioneering missionary to Uganda. The son of a Free Church of Scotland minister, he studied engineering in Edinburgh and Berlin. In 1876 Mackay answered a call of the Church Missionary Society to go to Uganda, where King Mutesa I of Buganda (reigned, 1856–84) had expressed an interest in receiving Christian missionaries. In November 1878 Mackay arrived in Uganda, where he spent nearly 14 years, never once returning to his native Scotland. He translated the Gospel of Matthew into Luganda and applied his ...
In Uganda for Christ: The Life Story of the Rev. John Samuel Callis B.A., of the Church Missionary Society
In Uganda for Christ is a biography of the Reverend John Samuel Callis (1870–97), an early Christian missionary to Uganda. Callis was born in England and graduated from Saint Catharine’s College, Cambridge. Moved by the death of his eldest sister, he decided to dedicate his life to the church. After studying theology and working among the poor in London, he was ordained an Anglican priest on May 28, 1893. He served three years as curate outside London and then offered himself to the Church Missionary Society for the ...
The Church in Uganda: A Charge to the Missionaries of the Uganda Mission, 1913
The Church in Uganda: A Charge to the Missionaries of the Uganda Mission, 1913 contains the text of a document by J.J. Willis, bishop of Uganda, addressed to the Anglican missionaries in Uganda on the eve of the 1913 meeting of the Uganda synod. The document has two parts: the first is an overview of the situation of the church in Uganda and of the work done in the previous year; the second part deals with problems encountered by the Uganda mission in the field. The report on the ...
Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa
Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa is an account in two volumes by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914) of his work as Anglican bishop of Eastern Equatorial Africa in 1890–99 and as the first bishop of Uganda from 1899 until 1908, when the book was published. Volume 1 includes a review of the early history of European involvement in East Africa, from the arrival of the first Church Missionary Society (CMS) missionary in Mombasa (present-day Kenya) in 1844. It recounts Tucker’s arrival in Africa in 1890 and ...
The Story of the Life of Mackay of Uganda Told for Boys
The Story of the Life of Mackay of Uganda Told for Boys is a biography of Alexander Murdoch Mackay (1849–90), a pioneering Scottish missionary to Uganda. Written by Mackay’s sister, Alexina Mackay Harrison, and published in London in 1892, the book was intended to inspire boys to follow Mackay’s example and devote their lives to service in Africa. It begins with a brief account of the early European explorers of Africa: Mungo Park, who in 1796 ventured up the River Niger; James Bruce, who in 1770 traced ...