3 results
Chronicle of Knights in Armor
This book on the proper mode of conduct for a knight was written in French in around 1410 by Christine de Pisan, Europe's first prolific and respected female author. It was translated into English and printed by William Caxton (1422?-91) in 1489 at the behest of Henry VII, who wished to make it available to English soldiers. The book contained not only rules of conduct, such as how a victorious knight should treat a prisoner of war, but also practical information that Pisan had gleaned from several classical ...
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Library of Congress
Amadis of Gaul
Amadís de Gaula (Amadis of Gaul) is a famous prose romance of chivalry, first composed in Spain or Portugal and most likely based on French sources. An early version of the work probably existed by the late 13th century or early 14th century. A version in three books, of which brief fragments are extant, can be dated around 1420. Garci Rodriguez de Montalvo, ruler of Medina del Campo, reworked that version, added a fourth book, and continued with a fifth, entitled Las sergas de Esplandián (The adventures of Esplandian). The ...
Contributed by
National Library of Spain
Amadis of Gaul
Amadís de Gaula (Amadis of Gaul) belongs to the genre of chivalric romances written in Spain in the late 15th century and the first half of the 16th century, often based on French sources. They are characterized as imaginative works of illusion, filled with wonders and enchantments. The Amadís of the National Library of Colombia is a beautiful volume of 600 pages (more than 1,500 pages in today's editions), printed in two columns in gothic type. It is illustrated with numerous woodcuts covering a wide variety of ...
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National Library of Colombia