10 results in English
Album of Appreciation of the Fragrance of Spring
Takuhanga is a printing technique in which a cloth-covered cotton ball containing black ink is patted on wet paper placed on an intaglio-engraved woodblock. The technique derives from takuhon, the art of rubbing found in Chinese copybooks printed from the works of old masters of calligraphy. This late-18th-century takuhanga album includes poems in the Chinese style celebrating the spring scenery of Kyoto written by learned men from the city who were students of Chinese literature, including Iwagaki Ryūkei (1741−1808). The drawings are by prominent Kyoto artists from the time ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
The Plum Blossom
The plum blossom and bamboo sometimes are paired as friends in Chinese culture. Both are symbols of purity and steadfastness. This pairing is reflected in this late 17th-early 18th century painting and the accompanying poem. He Shikun was a Ming-dynasty figure who is identified in two local gazetteers as being from Xinhui, in Guangdong. The inscription here, however, identifies him as being from Wuyang, an old name for Guangzhou, to the north of Xinhui. In 1646, in the chaotic weeks before Xinhui surrendered to the Qing dynasty forces that had ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Two Illustrations from "Selected Arias of the Yuan Dynasty"
These prints from around 1615 show two figures from Yuan-dynasty (1279-1368) poetry. The right-hand picture illustrates a play about Zheng Kongmu, a law clerk, and Song Bin, a young man who accidentally killed a man. Zheng recognizes Song Bin as an honorable man and convinces the judge not to execute him. Instead, he is exiled to a penal colony where he has many adventures, including meeting up with and helping Zheng Kongmu when he himself runs afoul of the law by killing a woman who mistreated his children. The other ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Emperor Kangxi's Poems on Thirty-Six Scenic Spots of Bi Shu Shan Zhuang, the Imperial Summer Resort
Bi shu shan zhuang is China’s largest imperial palace garden. Situated in Rehe (present-day Chengde, Hebei province) in a river valley bordered by mountains on the west, north, and east, the villa consists of palace halls, lakes, plains, and mountains. Construction of the complex spanned many years, beginning in 1703 under Emperor Kangxi (1654-1722). On the occasion of the completion of the main palace complex in 1711, Kangxi bestowed the title of Bi shu shan zhuang (Summer Mountain Villa) on the villa and selected 36 scenic spots and composed ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Illustrated Poem of Li Sao
This work is an illustrated edition of the Qing dynasty of the poem Li sao (Departing sorrow) by Qu Yuan, who lived circa 343-277 BCE. It was illustrated by Xiao Yuncong (1596-1673), a famed early Qing painter, and was engraved by Tang Yongxian. According to Wang Zhongmin in A descriptive catalog of rare Chinese books in the Library of Congress (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1957) Pan Zuyin (1830-90), a late Qing man of letters and linguist and Qing official, reissued the work and rebound it in four volumes, but ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Jing Xin Collection of Poems by Chen Zi
This manuscript collection contains poems by Chen Zi (1683–1759), a native of Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, and a famed poet and calligrapher during the Kangxi and Qianlong periods of the Qing dynasty. Though twice recommended for official positions, Chen declined to serve the Qing court. The poems in the work were copied and preserved by his friends during the Qing literary inquisition. Literary inquisition in China had a long history, but during the Qing dynasty such official persecution of intellectuals, commonly called wen zi yu (imprisonment for writing), was particularly ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Collected Poems of Yizhizhai Studio
The author of this work, Ding Yan (1794–1875), was a native of Shanyang (part of present-day Huai’an, Jiangsu Province), an accomplished scholar, and a government official. After achieving the rank of ju ren, a successful candidate at the provincial level examination, but failing to acquire his jin shi (doctoral degree), he declined minor official appointments and returned to Shanyang, where he became active in local affairs. In 1842 he led the local civilian corps in defense of his city, confronted the British fleet that had entered the Yangtze ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Collected Works of Wang Yu'ai
This collection consists of works by Wang Huai, a native of Xiuning, Anhui Province, a poet and calligrapher, whose style name was Yu’ai. The work has eight juan in six volumes and was printed during the Wanli reign (1573–1620) of the Ming dynasty. The eight juan contain Wang Huai’s verse in various formats, including poems in folk song style, poems in five-character or seven-character lines, pentasyllabic and heptasyllabic verse or quatrains, and long regulated verse. His poems followed the style of the so-called former and later seven ...
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Poems from the Zichuang Pavilion
This is an incomplete manuscript of collected poems written by Wenzhao (1681–1732), grandson of General Zhangtai (1636–90), a member of the imperial Manchu family. Striving for mastery in composing poetry, Wenzhao became a disciple of the great Qing poet Wang Shizhen (1634–1711), who was also a successful high official. In 1714 Wenzhao pleaded illness and thus was exempted from service in the imperial Clan Court and was allowed to retire and devote his life entirely to poetry. He also loved to plant flowers. He left 21 poetry ...
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The Annotated Literary Anthology by Xiao Tong
Wen xuan (Selected literature) is one of the earliest collections of Chinese poetry. It includes verse from the Qin dynasty (221–207 BC), the Han dynasty (206 BC–220 AD), and later. It was compiled around 520 during the Southern and Northern Dynasties (420–589) by Xiao Tong (501–31), the eldest son of Emperor Wu of Liang (but who died before ascending to the throne), and a group of scholars he had assembled. Many annotated editions of the Wen xuan appeared after Xiao Tong’s death, of which the ...
Contributed by National Central Library