44 results in English
Native Festival for the New Year's Holiday, Sail Sali Nau. Egg Vendor
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Folk Festival to Celebrate the New Year. Carousel
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Ringling Circus Winter Quarters, Sarasota, Florida
John Ringling (1866–1936), one of the seven Ringling brothers who dominated the development of the American circus in the late 19th and early 20th century, moved the winter quarters of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus from its original quarters in Bridgeport, Connecticut, to Sarasota, Florida. Ringling’s vision, as recalled by Fred Bradna, equestrian director for the show, in his book The Big Top, was to “lay out the quarters like a zoo, and thousands of visitors will pay to see it. I’ll build an open-air ...
Topsy-Turvy Land: Arabia Pictured for Children
Samuel Zwemer (1867–1952) was an American missionary who became known as the “Apostle to Islam” for his strenuous if not always successful evangelization efforts in Islamic countries. He attended Hope College in Holland, Michigan, and the New Brunswick Seminary in New Jersey. In 1889 he and a classmate founded the American Arabian Mission, which later received sponsorship from the Reformed Church. The next year he departed for the Arabian Peninsula. In 1896 he met and married Amy Wilkes (died 1937), an Australian fellow missionary and nurse. The Zwemers spent ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Emperor Alexander II with the Children: Sergei and Maria
This photograph, taken in 1860 or 1861, shows Tsar Alexander II (1818−81, ruled 1855−81), with two of his eight children: Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna (born 1853) and Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich (born 1857). Alexander is seated in a chair, three-quarters to his left, wearing a military uniform. The grand duchess is leaning on her father’s right knee, facing forward; the grand duke is sitting on his father’s left leg.  Alexander was most respected for his emancipation of the serfs in 1861, and his domestic reforms included ...
Family of Emperor Alexander III
This photograph of the family of Tsar Alexander III (1845−94) was taken about a year before his death from nephritis. Also shown in the photo are Empress Maria Fedorovna (1866−1928), Grand Duke Nicholas Alexandrovich (1868−1918), Grand Duke George Alexandrovich (1871−99), Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna (1875−1960), Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna (1882−1918), and Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich (1878−1918). Empress Maria Fedorovna, also called Princess Dagmar, fled Russia in 1919 with other members of the Romanov family aboard the British battleship HMS Marlborough. She settled and ...
Baking Industry. Vendor of Kulche Flatbread
This photograph is from the trades (economic) part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Unidentified African American Soldier in Union Uniform with Wife and Two Daughters
In May 1863, U.S. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton issued General Order Number 143 creating the Bureau of U. S. Colored Troops. This photograph shows an unidentified African American soldier in a Union uniform, with his wife in dress and hat, and two daughters wearing matching coats and hats. The image was found in Cecil County, Maryland, making it likely that this soldier belonged to one of the seven United States Colored Troop regiments raised in Maryland. The photograph is from the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Unidentified Girl in Mourning Dress Holding Framed Photograph of Her Father
This photograph shows a girl holding a framed image of her father. Judging from her necklace, mourning ribbons, and dress, it is likely that her father was killed in the war. The man in the portrait is recognizable as a Union cavalryman with a sword, wearing a Hardee hat (the regulation hat for enlisted men). The photograph is from the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs at the Library of Congress. The collection includes more than 1,000 special portrait photographs, called ambrotypes and tintypes, representing both Union and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Albazin Child. Albazin Prisoners of War Professed the Orthodox Religion but Adopted Chinese Language and Customs after Captured by Manchurians in 1685. Beijing, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Young Albania
This photograph of two small Albanian boys in picturesque costumes, wearing shoes with pointed, up-turned toes, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Five Girls Knitting, Albania
This photograph of young girls in Albania is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Between Weedpatch and Lamont, Kern County, California. Children Living in Camp... Rent $2.75 Plus Electricity
"Between Weedpatch and Lamont, Kern County, California. Children living in camp." This photograph and the accompanying description are by Dorothea Lange (1895-1965), one of the most important American photographers of the 20th century. After apprenticing in New York City, Lange moved to San Francisco and in 1919 established her own studio. During the 1920s and early 1930s, she worked as a portrait photographer. In 1932, wanting to see a world different from the society families she had been photographing, she began shooting San Francisco's labor unrest and urban unemployed ...
Youngster, Clutching His Soldier Father, Gazes Upward While the Latter Lifts His Wife from the Ground to Wish Her a "Merry Christmas": The serviceman is one of those fortunate enough to be able to get home for the holidays
This photograph, from Christmas 1944, was produced by the Office of War Information, a wartime U.S. government agency established in June 1942 to coordinate the release of domestic and international news, with the aims of bolstering morale at home and undermining that of the enemy abroad. Images and captions such as these were intended to convey a positive, uplifting message in a time of war. Many well-known writers and photographers worked for the Office of War Information, including poet and former Librarian of Congress Archibald MacLeish, the photographer Gordon ...
Hayward, California, Two Children of the Mochida Family who, with Their Parents, Are Awaiting Evacuation
In 1942, Executive Order 9066 ordered the removal of 110,000 civilians of Japanese descent, including 71,000 American citizens, from the western United States for placement in internment camps. The evacuees were suspected, without evidence, of being potential supporters of Japan, with which the United States was then at war. This photograph, taken by noted photographer Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) for the government agency known as the War Relocation Authority, shows one family waiting to be taken away. Lange’s notes on the photograph read: "Members of the Mochida family ...
Chinese Children at the Tjap-Gomeh Festival in Makassar
This photograph shows Chinese children participating in the Tjap Go Meh Festival in Makassar, the largest city on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. Tjap Go Meh, which takes place 15 days after Chinese New Year, was widely celebrated among Chinese immigrants in Indonesia, and became popular with the local population as well. Also known as the Lantern Festival, it involves parades and performances similar to those on the new year. The picture was taken by the studio of British photographers Walter Bentley Woodbury and James Page, who arrived in the ...
People, Including Children, in Market, Hungary
This photograph of a market scene in Hungary is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kazuo and Masuko Kamiya as Children
This photograph, taken about 1920, shows two young children of the Yamato Colony, a farming community in south Florida founded by Japanese immigrant Jo Sakai in 1905 with the encouragement of Florida authorities, who thought the Japanese would introduce innovative farming methods and new crops. Yamato was an ancient name for Japan. The community was located in what is now Boca Raton, and the farmers grew pineapples and later winter vegetables. Jo Sakai encouraged young men from his Japanese village, Miyazu, to settle at Yamato, a prospect that appealed to ...
Three Indian Children, Guatemala
This 1904 photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows three Mayan Indian children in Guatemala. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Catching Cicadas
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. This print is a page from an egoyomi (pictorial calendar), which ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Charming Sumo Match
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. Sumo wrestling became a professional sport in the early Edo period ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
"The Child at Your Door." 400,000 Orphans Starving, No State Aid Available. Campaign for $30,000,000
The American Committee for Armenian and Syrian Relief was established in 1915 with the cooperation of the United States Department of State, for the purpose of providing humanitarian relief to Armenians forcibly deported from Anatolia to other parts of the Ottoman Empire during World War I. The Ottoman parliament passed a law by which privately collected funds from the United States could be distributed to displaced Armenians via the U.S. Embassy in Constantinople. The committee, which raised millions of dollars at public rallies and churches, issued this poster as ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Daddy, What Did You Do in the Great War?
Until the entry into force, on March 2, 1916, of the Military Service Act introducing conscription, Great Britain’s World War I army was comprised entirely of volunteers. Many of the most famous wartime posters were recruitment appeals. This 1915 poster, designed and printed by Johnson, Riddle & Company of London for the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, shows a father in the comfort of his postwar home, being asked by his children, “Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” Commercial advertising in mass-circulation newspapers and magazines was a well-developed industry ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Enlist
The British-owned passenger liner Lusitania was sunk by a German submarine off the southern coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915, while en route from New York to Liverpool. Of 1,959 people on board, only 764 survived. Among those drowned were 128 Americans. The incident caused outrage in the United States and nearly led to a break in relations between the United States and Germany, which was only averted when the German government pledged to limit future submarine attacks on civilian and neutral ships. This poster, issued by the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Group of Children. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kurd Woman with Children. Artvin
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Group of Children, with Baskets, Posed under Palm Tree
This photograph of a scene in Saigon (present-day Ho Chi Minh City), Vietnam is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sart Schoolchildren. Samarkand
This winter photograph shows four Sart schoolchildren accompanied by an elder (probably a teacher). The children appear to be singing. The exposure times necessary for this photographic process would require that they hold the pose, including open mouths, for a few seconds. The group is seated against a backdrop formed by adobe walls, with two gnarled plane trees. The lattice windows of the back wall suggest a religious structure. The term “Sart” has various meanings and was used at the time to refer to town dwellers, as well as to ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sart Types. Samarkand
Seen here are three generations of males identified in the photographer’s caption as “types of Sart.” The term “Sart” has various meanings and was used in the 19th century to refer to town dwellers, as well as to people who inhabited this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. The grandfather, in the back, has a shaved skull and long beard. He is wearing a fine quilted coat lined on the interior with colorful fabric. On the left is the father of the two boys ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Children Sitting along Passageway, Two Minarets Topped with Birds' Nests in Background
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sart Schoolchildren. Samarkand
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Russian Soldiers Frightened by Toy Figures of Japanese Soldiers Hanging by Strings
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Momotaro and Kaidomaru Wrestling
This nishiki-e (multicolored woodblock print) is by Utagawa Kunisada I, also called Toyokuni III and other names, who lived circa 1786–1864 and was a leading artist of ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world). He was famous for his prints of Kabuki actors, beautiful women, and sumo (Japanese traditional wrestling). A favorite pictorial joke in the Edo period (1600–1867) was the depiction of sumo performed by unusual participants. In this print Kunisada shows the meeting of the two strong boys of Japanese folktales, Momotarō and Kintarō. Momotarō, born from ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Street of the Camels, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of women and a child on the Street of the Camels in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Casbah of Algiers was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life,” where “a few streets only, with small mosques, coffee-houses, and shops, show signs of life in the daytime, and that chiefly on Fridays and Sundays ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Beggars in front of the Mosque “Sidi Abderrhaman,” Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Mosque of Sidi Abderrahman in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The mosque was built in 1696 and dedicated to the learned marabout (holy man or mystic) Sidi Abderrahman (circa 1387–1468). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers told tourists that the mosque “has no attraction beyond its elegant minaret, adorned with coloured tiles; but its situation near the Jardin Marengo, and the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Sacred Wood, Blidah, Algeria
This photochrome print from Blida, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the town was “one of the pleasantest provincial towns in Algeria, with a strong garrison … charmingly situated at the N. base of the Tell Atlas, on the right bank of the Oued el-Kebir.” Blida was a Roman military site, but the town “is said to have been founded ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Group of Arabs, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a group of Arab men and boys in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described the old city of Algiers as presenting “a highly attractive picture of Oriental life.” Arabs were the dominant group in the population, then as now, but many of the people were Berbers or from other Mahgribi population groups. The city had been ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Moorish Woman and Child on the Terrace, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a woman and child, most likely of Arab or Berber origin, in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The people in the photograph are identified as Moors, a term that refers to people of mixed Arab and Berber descent who inhabit the coastal regions of northwestern Africa, including Algeria. The terrace in the foreground of the print overlooks both the harbor and the Champ de Manoeuvres, the city’s racecourse and exercise ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Moorish Woman and Child on the Terrace, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a woman and child, most likely of Arab or Berber origin, in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The people in the photograph are identified as Moors, a term that refers to people of mixed Arab and Berber descent who inhabit the coastal regions of northwestern Africa, including Algeria. The terrace in the foreground of the print overlooks both the harbor and the Champ de Manoeuvres, the city’s racecourse and exercise ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Moorish Family in the Cemetery, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a family visiting a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and searoutes: Handbook for Travellers described a number of cemeteries in the city, including the Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt, and cemeteries for the Jewish and Christian communities on the slopes of Mont Bouzaréah, under the church of Notre Dame d’Afrique. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Independence Square Recruiting Camps
In September–October 1862, Independence Square in Philadelphia became Camp Independence, a Civil War recruitment camp. This trade card, produced by the Children’s Central Clothing Emporium, shows well-dressed children on the central promenade of the square. Tents manned by soldiers line the promenade, and a group of children carrying drums, flags, and a hoop are seen walking in the foreground, along with a mother and son. The work is by James Fuller Queen, a Philadelphia lithographer and pioneer chromolithographer known for his attention to detail. Queen served in the ...
View of the Department for White Children of the House of Refuge
This print depicts the buildings of the Department for White Children of the House of Refuge in Philadelphia, including the girls’ dormitories (first and second class), the girls’ work and sitting room, the officers’ rooms and main entrance, the boys’ dormitories, and the boys’ workshop. The lithograph is one of a pair of illustrations also printed on textile in 1858, as well as was used as the frontispiece to the Thirtieth Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the House of Refuge, the other being “View of the Department ...