42 results in English
Dormition Cathedral Ensemble, West View, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This northeast view across the Sukhona River of the cathedral ensemble at Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast), was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located where the Sukhona and Iug rivers merge to form the Northern Dvina River, the town derives its name from "mouth of the Iug," with the epithet velikii (great) added at the end of the 16th century, in recognition of the city's importance. This network ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel of Archangel Michael, from Lelikozero Village (Late 18th Century), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of Archangel Michael on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1991 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of Archangel Michael, built at the end of the 18th century, originally was located at ...
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Chapel of the Dormition (Late 17th Century?), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of the Dormition at the village of Vasil'evo on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of the Dormition, built at the end of the ...
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Chapel of the Miraculous Image of Christ, from Vigovo Village (Late 17th Century?), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of the Miraculous Image of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of the Miraculous Image of the Savior dates from ...
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Chapel in the Settlement of Spassky. Golodnaia Steppe
Among the primary initiators of Russian development projects in Turkestan was Grand Duke Nicholas Konstantinovich (1850–1918), grandson of Tsar Nicholas I, who in 1881 moved to Tashkent. There he sponsored a number of initiatives, including a vast irrigation scheme to make Golodnaia Steppe (“Hungry Steppe,” present-day Uzbekistan) a productive area for raising cotton and wheat. Conditions in the region were harsh, and it was sometimes difficult to attract Russian settlers by providing arable land. Shown here is the primitive structure of an Orthodox chapel at the settlement of Spasskii ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel and Cross from the Time of Peter the Great, in the Village of Sumskoe. Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Canal) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A major part of the system was the Ladoga Canal, built in 1719–31 to protect ships from the severe storms on Lake Ladoga. The central point on the canal was Novaia Ladoga (New Ladoga), founded by Tsar Peter I (the Great) in 1704. This photograph was taken in 1909 in the village of Sumskoe, located some 30 kilometers to the west of Novaia Ladoga. It shows an open wooden chapel with ...
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Chapel in Miatusovo. Russian Empire
This 1909 photograph depicts a chapel in the village of Miatusovo, which is located upriver from the town of Podporozhe on the Svir River. The chapel was built in the late 19th century of brick covered with stucco. The decorative gable over the entrance contains an inscription. The structure, which no longer exists, was enclosed by a picket fence. In the background is a large house built of logs. The Svir River, which flows 224 kilometers from Lake Onega west to Lake Ladoga, is a major part of the Mariinskii ...
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Materiki. Mother of God Chapel and the Pine Tree on Which the Icon Appeared. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Chapel for Water Blessing, in the Village of Deviatiny. Russian Empire
This photograph, made in 1909, shows an open wooden chapel for the blessing of water in the village of Deviatiny, located on the Vytegra River some 20 kilometers north of the town of Vytegra. Built over a pool at the riverbank, the chapel has decorative carving in the manner of a pavilion. In the background is the river, with village houses on the far bank. The Vytegra River, which flows northwest into Lake Onega, is one of the components of the Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway ...
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Chapel of Emperor Peter the Great, near the Village of Petrovskoe. Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Canal) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A critical component of the system was a canal linking the Vytegra River (flowing into Lake Onega toward Saint Petersburg) and the Kovzha River (flowing south into White Lake). In 1799 this segment was named the Mariinskii Canal, which over time was rebuilt and improved. This 1909 photograph shows a memorial chapel dedicated to Tsar Peter I (the Great) in the village of Petrovskoe, located on the canal in the Vytegra region ...
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Chapel on the Site Where the City of Belozersk Was Founded in Ancient Times. Belozersk, Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. Among the major components of the waterway is White Lake in Vologda Oblast. At its southeastern end, the lake is drained by the Sheksna River, a tributary of the Volga. Shown here is a wooden chapel located near the village of Krokhino at the origin of the Sheksna. The chapel was dedicated to Saint Basil the Great and commemorated what was considered to be an earlier site of the medieval town of ...
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Chapel in the Village of Topornia. Russian Empire
This 1909 photograph shows a wooden chapel in the village of Topornia with a veranda and, on the west, a small porch supporting a bell cote. The chapel, which no longer exists, was surrounded by a picket fence. In the background is a typical northern izba (log house). The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A major component of the waterway is White Lake, which is drained at its southeastern part by the Sheksna River, a tributary of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel on Olga Hill. Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A primary component of the waterway is White Lake in Vologda Oblast. At its southeastern end the lake is drained by the Sheksna River, a tributary of the Volga. Among the major historic sites on the Sheksna is Goritsy, location of the Convent of the Resurrection, founded in 1544 by Princess Evfrosiniia Staritskaia. Shown in this 1909 photograph is a wooden chapel situated on Olga Hill near Goritsy. Built of logs, the ...
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Cross and Chapel Where the Venerable Kirill Prayed. Kirillov-Belozerskii Monastery, Kirillov, Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). One of the most important settlements near the Sheksna is Kirillov, founded in 1397 by the monk Kirill (Cyril) as part of his Dormition Monastery, subsequently named the Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery. Seen in this 1909 photograph amidst a grove of birch trees are two brick canopies, rebuilt in the early 19th century over sites associated with ...
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Petrozavodsk. Chapel Built by Peter the Great
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk, founded in September 1703, just four months after Saint Petersburg. Seen here is the southwest view of the Church of Saints Peter and Paul, commissioned by Tsar Peter I most likely in 1703. The structure, referred to in some sources as a cathedral, was built of logs with subsequent plank siding ...
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Chapel from the Time of Peter the Great, near Kivach Waterfall. Suna River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here along the route is a wooden chapel at the village of Vikshitsa, near the Kivach Waterfall in Karelia. In the background is Lake Pertozero, set within of a forest of aspen, birch, and conifers. The chapel is identified as dating from the time of Peter the Great (early ...
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Near the Sawmill on the Kumsa River near the Medvezhia Gora Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is a water-powered sawmill located on the Kumsa River near Medvezhia Gora Station. The large main structure, coverd with painted siding, shows careful design. On the right is the ramp for hoisting logs to be sawn. Below is a sluice for water from the narrow rapids (not visible ...
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Peter's Chapel in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Seen here is the Chapel of Saint Savvatii (misidentified in the caption) at the Savvatii skete (monastic retreat) on Great Solovetskii Island. This site was sacred because of its association with a founder of the monastery, the venerable ...
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Aleksandr Nevskii Chapel on the Hill in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
This photograph was taken near the historic area of the Solovetskii-Transfiguration Monastery, located on the Solovetskii Archipelago in the southwestern part of the White Sea. The caption erroneously identifies the church on the distant hill as Saint Alexander Nevskii Chapel. It is in fact the Church of the Ascension on Sekirnaia Hill, one of the most renowned skete (monastic retreats) on the islands. The church was built in 1860–62 with a single cupola. Because of the church’s elevated position, the cupola was surmounted with a powerful lantern that ...
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Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker Chapel in the Vetluga Settlement
The town of Zlatoust is located in the northwest part of contemporary Cheliabinsk Oblast. Named in honor of Saint John Chrysostom (Golden-Tongued, or zlatoust), Zlatoust was founded in 1754 and became a center of metalworking and armaments production. One of the pioneering factory owners was Larion I. Luginin, member of a merchant dynasty from Tula. His properties included the village of Vetluga (now an eastern district within Zlatoust), which was settled in the late 18th century by factory serfs from the Vetluga region of Kostroma Province. Seen here is the ...
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Chapel by the Road, near Zlatoust
The Ural Mountains region is a major source of metal ores. Zlatoust, located in the northwest part of present-day Cheliabinsk Oblast, is named in honor of Saint John Chrysostom (“Golden-Tongued,” or zlatoust). The town was founded in 1754 and became a center of metal working and armaments. Harsh working conditions led to periodic outbreaks of violence such as the Pugachev Rebellion (1774–76). Seen in this 1910 photograph is a large brick chapel on the road near the village of Vetluga, which later became one of the eastern districts of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Factory Pond and Nikolskaia Mountain. Ust-Katavskii Plant. At the Top of the Mountain, a Chapel in Honor of the Holy Coronation of the Sovereign Emperor Nicholas II
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel on the Site Where Mikhail Nikitich Romanov Was Imprisoned. View from the East. The Village of Nyrob. Ural
The historic settlement of Nyrob in the northern Urals is 40 kilometers to the north of the regional center of Cherdyn’. Mentioned in written sources as early as 1579, Nyrob became known as a place of exile. It was there, in 1601, that Tsar Boris Godunov exiled Mikhail Nikitich Romanov, uncle of Mikhail Fedorovich Romanov, who in 1613 became the first tsar of the Romanov dynasty. The death of the elder Romanov in 1602, caused by harsh treatment while in captivity, endowed the site with special significance for the Romanovs ...
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Same Chapel on the Site Where Mikhail Nikitich Romanov Was Imprisoned, View from the Southeast. The Village of Nyrob. Ural
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Same Chapel on the Site Where Mikhail Nikitich Romanov Was Imprisoned. View from the West. The Village of Nyrob. Ural
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel and Spring at the Site Where the Icon of Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker Appeared. Nyrob
The historic settlement of Nyrob in the northern Urals is 40 kilometers to the north of the regional center of Cherdyn’. Mentioned in written sources as early as 1579, Nyrob became known as a place of exile. It was there, in 1601, that Tsar Boris Godunov exiled Mikhail Nikitich Romanov, uncle of Mikhail Fedorovich Romanov, who in 1613 became the first tsar of the Romanov dynasty. The death of the elder Romanov in 1602, caused by harsh treatment while in captivity, endowed the site with special significance for the Romanovs ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel of Our Savior on the Site of Dead Soldiers, in the City of Cherdyn
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel on Chapan-Ata Mountain, Five Versts from Samarkand
This photograph shows the Chapan-Ata mazar (mausoleum), located several kilometers northeast of Samarkand (present-day Uzbekistan). The mausoleum takes its name from the summit on which it is located (chapan is a local word for shepherd). Its archaic centralized form, resembling similar structures from the 15th century, suffered damage over the centuries. Only a small portion of its original ceramic tile surface is visible, and the structure, built of adobe brick, is braced by several simple buttresses. The high drum supporting the dome has been coated with stucco. The image is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Old Chapel on a Street in the City of Ostashkov
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
This Chapel in Ostashkov Is Far from the Embankment, at the Corner of Volodarskii Street and Adrianov Lane (Earlier, Kamennaia Street and 11th Lane)
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Old Chapel on an Island
Tver is an ancient city on the Volga River to the northwest of Moscow. One of the Tver region’s major religious institutions is the Saint Nil-Stolobenskii Monastery (Nilo-Stolobenskaia pustyn’), on Stolobny Island in Lake Seliger. In 1594 Patriarch Job of Moscow sanctioned the founding of a monastery on this island where the venerable Nil (Nilus), a renowned ascetic, lived for 27 years until his death in December 1554. In the 18th and 19th centuries it flourished and became one of Russia’s largest monasteries. This view shows a modest ...
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Chapel on the Holy Mountain (Thirty-Eight Versts from Tver), on the Site Where the Saint Mikhail, Prince of Tver, Bid Goodbye to the Boyars Who Accompanied Him on His Way to the Horde
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A primary component of the waterway is White Lake in Vologda Oblast. At its southeastern end the lake is drained by the Sheksna River, a tributary of the Volga. Among the major historic sites on the Sheksna is Goritsy, location of the Convent of the Resurrection, founded in 1544 by Princess Evfrosiniia Staritskaia. Shown in this 1909 photograph is a wooden chapel situated on Olga Hill near Goritsy. Built of logs, the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel on the Site Where the Wife of Ivan the Terrible Gave Birth. Three Versts from Feodor Stratilat Monastery. Pereslavl-Zalesskii
Shown here is a memorial chapel near Pereslavl-Zalesskii at the site on which Tsaritsa Anastasiia Romanovna, wife of Ivan the Terrible, gave birth in 1557 to the royal couple’s third son, Feodor. Located three kilometers from the Monastery of Saint Theodore Stratilites on the southern approach to the town, the original chapel was built of wood. In the mid 17th century it was rebuilt in brick in an ornate style typical of the period. Dedicated to Saint Theodore, the chapel was known as “The Cross” because of the presence ...
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Chapel on Georgievskii Rock. The Chapel Is Called Georgievskaia. Chusovaia River
Originating in the southern Urals, the Chusovaia River flows some 590 kilometers to the northwest and empties into the Kama River near the city of Perm. Bounded by high rocky cliffs, the Chusovaia was known for its dramatic scenery. Shown in this photograph, taken on the steep forested bank of the river, is the wooden Chapel of Saint George, which gave its name to a grouping of cliffs (Georgievskii Rock) on the right bank of the river near the large village of Utkinskaia Sloboda (77 kilometers from Ekaterinburg). The chapel ...
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Small Town of Kliuchi, Seven Versts from the City of Shadrinsk
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Near Shadrinsk, Twenty-Four Versts. Study. A Chapel Commemorating the Appearance of the Icon of Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker
The caption to this photograph identifies the chapel pictured as located 24 versts (about the same distance in kilometers) from Shadrinsk and dedicated to a miraculous appearance of an icon of Saint Nicholas. The precise location of the domed brick chapel is not given. In terms of its design, the chapel appears to date from the early 19th century. The vast, grassy space with a forested elevation in the distant background is characteristic of a forest-steppe zone. The long wooden fence suggests an enclosure for grazing lands. The image is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Chapel on Chapan-Ata Mountain, Five Versts from Samarkand
This photograph shows the Chapan-Ata mazar (mausoleum), located several kilometers northeast of Samarkand (present-day Uzbekistan). The mausoleum takes its name from the summit on which it is located (chapan is a local word for shepherd). Its archaic centralized form, resembling similar structures from the 15th century, suffered damage over the centuries. Only a small portion of its original ceramic tile surface is visible, and the structure, built of adobe brick, is braced by several simple buttresses. The high drum supporting the dome has been coated with stucco. The image is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Cemetery, with Chapel, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (died 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Chapel of Las Lajas, Painted from the Right Bank of the Guáitara River, Túquerres Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the 19th-century Chapel of Las Lajas in the canyon of the Guáitara River at Ipiales, Túquerres Province (present-day Nariño Department), southwest Colombia. The chapel was built here to honor the miraculous appearance of the Virgin Mary on a laja (flat sedimentary rock or slab). Situated more than 2,600 meters above sea level in the Cordillera Central, the site became a popular place of pilgrimage and was replaced in the 20th century by a Gothic Revival cathedral. The watercolor is typical ...
General View of Laurel Hill Cemetery
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery, built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman, is seen in this bird's-eye view of part of the grounds. This view shows horse-drawn carriages and ...
General View of Laurel Hill Cemetery
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery was built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman. In the foreground, horse-drawn carriages approach the main gate (visible at left) of the cemetery, which contains ...
Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery was built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman. This view shows the main gate. A man on horseback rides past the cemetery, in which the ...