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Dormition Cathedral Ensemble, West View, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This northeast view across the Sukhona River of the cathedral ensemble at Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast), was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located where the Sukhona and Iug rivers merge to form the Northern Dvina River, the town derives its name from "mouth of the Iug," with the epithet velikii (great) added at the end of the 16th century, in recognition of the city's importance. This network ...
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Library of Congress
Chapel of Archangel Michael, from Lelikozero Village (Late 18th Century), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of Archangel Michael on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1991 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of Archangel Michael, built at the end of the 18th century, originally was located at ...
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Chapel of the Dormition (Late 17th Century?), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of the Dormition at the village of Vasil'evo on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of the Dormition, built at the end of the ...
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Chapel of the Miraculous Image of Christ, from Vigovo Village (Late 17th Century?), West View, Kizhi Island, Russia
This west view of the Chapel of the Miraculous Image of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) on Kizhi Island (Karelia) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located within an archipelago in the southwestern part of Lake Onega, Kizhi Island is one of the most revered sites in the Russian north. It was organized as a museum in 1960. The Chapel of the Miraculous Image of the Savior dates from ...
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Chapel in the Settlement of Spassky. Golodnaia Steppe
Among the primary initiators of Russian development projects in Turkestan was Grand Duke Nicholas Konstantinovich (1850–1918), grandson of Tsar Nicholas I, who in 1881 moved to Tashkent. There he sponsored a number of initiatives, including a vast irrigation scheme to make Golodnaia Steppe (“Hungry Steppe,” present-day Uzbekistan) a productive area for raising cotton and wheat. Conditions in the region were harsh, and it was sometimes difficult to attract Russian settlers by providing arable land. Shown here is the primitive structure of an Orthodox chapel at the settlement of Spasskii ...
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Library of Congress
Chapel and Cross from the Time of Peter the Great, in the Village of Sumskoe. Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Canal) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A major part of the system was the Ladoga Canal, built in 1719–31 to protect ships from the severe storms on Lake Ladoga. The central point on the canal was Novaia Ladoga (New Ladoga), founded by Tsar Peter I (the Great) in 1704. This photograph was taken in 1909 in the village of Sumskoe, located some 30 kilometers to the west of Novaia Ladoga. It shows an open wooden chapel with ...
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Chapel in Miatusovo. Russian Empire
This 1909 photograph depicts a chapel in the village of Miatusovo, which is located upriver from the town of Podporozhe on the Svir River. The chapel was built in the late 19th century of brick covered with stucco. The decorative gable over the entrance contains an inscription. The structure, which no longer exists, was enclosed by a picket fence. In the background is a large house built of logs. The Svir River, which flows 224 kilometers from Lake Onega west to Lake Ladoga, is a major part of the Mariinskii ...
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Materiki. Mother of God Chapel and the Pine Tree on Which the Icon Appeared. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Chapel for Water Blessing, in the Village of Deviatiny. Russian Empire
This photograph, made in 1909, shows an open wooden chapel for the blessing of water in the village of Deviatiny, located on the Vytegra River some 20 kilometers north of the town of Vytegra. Built over a pool at the riverbank, the chapel has decorative carving in the manner of a pavilion. In the background is the river, with village houses on the far bank. The Vytegra River, which flows northwest into Lake Onega, is one of the components of the Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway ...
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Chapel of Emperor Peter the Great, near the Village of Petrovskoe. Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Canal) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A critical component of the system was a canal linking the Vytegra River (flowing into Lake Onega toward Saint Petersburg) and the Kovzha River (flowing south into White Lake). In 1799 this segment was named the Mariinskii Canal, which over time was rebuilt and improved. This 1909 photograph shows a memorial chapel dedicated to Tsar Peter I (the Great) in the village of Petrovskoe, located on the canal in the Vytegra region ...
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Chapel on the Site Where the City of Belozersk Was Founded in Ancient Times. Belozersk, Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. Among the major components of the waterway is White Lake in Vologda Oblast. At its southeastern end, the lake is drained by the Sheksna River, a tributary of the Volga. Shown here is a wooden chapel located near the village of Krokhino at the origin of the Sheksna. The chapel was dedicated to Saint Basil the Great and commemorated what was considered to be an earlier site of the medieval town of ...
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Chapel in the Village of Topornia. Russian Empire
This 1909 photograph shows a wooden chapel in the village of Topornia with a veranda and, on the west, a small porch supporting a bell cote. The chapel, which no longer exists, was surrounded by a picket fence. In the background is a typical northern izba (log house). The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A major component of the waterway is White Lake, which is drained at its southeastern part by the Sheksna River, a tributary of the ...
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Chapel on Olga Hill. Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. A primary component of the waterway is White Lake in Vologda Oblast. At its southeastern end the lake is drained by the Sheksna River, a tributary of the Volga. Among the major historic sites on the Sheksna is Goritsy, location of the Convent of the Resurrection, founded in 1544 by Princess Evfrosiniia Staritskaia. Shown in this 1909 photograph is a wooden chapel situated on Olga Hill near Goritsy. Built of logs, the ...
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Cross and Chapel Where the Venerable Kirill Prayed. Kirillov-Belozerskii Monastery, Kirillov, Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). One of the most important settlements near the Sheksna is Kirillov, founded in 1397 by the monk Kirill (Cyril) as part of his Dormition Monastery, subsequently named the Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery. Seen in this 1909 photograph amidst a grove of birch trees are two brick canopies, rebuilt in the early 19th century over sites associated with ...
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Petrozavodsk. Chapel Built by Peter the Great
Construction of a new railroad to the ice-free port of Murmansk lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917, when it was connected to the capital, Petrograd. Among the towns in this northern area along the route was Petrozavodsk, founded in September 1703, just four months after Saint Petersburg. Seen here is the southwest view of the Church of Saints Peter and Paul, commissioned by Tsar Peter I most likely in 1703. The structure, referred to in some sources as a cathedral, was built of logs with subsequent plank siding ...
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Chapel from the Time of Peter the Great, near Kivach Waterfall. Suna River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here along the route is a wooden chapel at the village of Vikshitsa, near the Kivach Waterfall in Karelia. In the background is Lake Pertozero, set within of a forest of aspen, birch, and conifers. The chapel is identified as dating from the time of Peter the Great (early ...
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Near the Sawmill on the Kumsa River near the Medvezhia Gora Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Shown here is a water-powered sawmill located on the Kumsa River near Medvezhia Gora Station. The large main structure, coverd with painted siding, shows careful design. On the right is the ramp for hoisting logs to be sawn. Below is a sluice for water from the narrow rapids (not visible ...
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Peter's Chapel in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Near the route was the Transfiguration Monastery, located on Great Solovetskii Island. Seen here is the Chapel of Saint Savvatii (misidentified in the caption) at the Savvatii skete (monastic retreat) on Great Solovetskii Island. This site was sacred because of its association with a founder of the monastery, the venerable ...
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Aleksandr Nevskii Chapel on the Hill in the Solovetskii Monastery. Solovetski Islands
This photograph was taken near the historic area of the Solovetskii-Transfiguration Monastery, located on the Solovetskii Archipelago in the southwestern part of the White Sea. The caption erroneously identifies the church on the distant hill as Saint Alexander Nevskii Chapel. It is in fact the Church of the Ascension on Sekirnaia Hill, one of the most renowned skete (monastic retreats) on the islands. The church was built in 1860–62 with a single cupola. Because of the church’s elevated position, the cupola was surmounted with a powerful lantern that ...
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Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker Chapel in the Vetluga Settlement
The town of Zlatoust is located in the northwest part of contemporary Cheliabinsk Oblast. Named in honor of Saint John Chrysostom (Golden-Tongued, or zlatoust), Zlatoust was founded in 1754 and became a center of metalworking and armaments production. One of the pioneering factory owners was Larion I. Luginin, member of a merchant dynasty from Tula. His properties included the village of Vetluga (now an eastern district within Zlatoust), which was settled in the late 18th century by factory serfs from the Vetluga region of Kostroma Province. Seen here is the ...
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Chapel by the Road, near Zlatoust
The Ural Mountains region is a major source of metal ores. Zlatoust, located in the northwest part of present-day Cheliabinsk Oblast, is named in honor of Saint John Chrysostom (“Golden-Tongued,” or zlatoust). The town was founded in 1754 and became a center of metal working and armaments. Harsh working conditions led to periodic outbreaks of violence such as the Pugachev Rebellion (1774–76). Seen in this 1910 photograph is a large brick chapel on the road near the village of Vetluga, which later became one of the eastern districts of ...
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