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11 results
Tadzhik Craft Customs. Festival on the Occasion of a Guild Initiation
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
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Library of Congress
Lhasa Street during the Tsog Chod Festival
This photograph shows a view of a street in Lhasa during the Tsog Chod festival (also seen as Ts'og Ch'od in other sources and called Sung ch'o in Tibetan) celebrated on the 29th day of the second moon of the Tibetan year. It is from a collection of 50 photographs of central Tibet acquired in 1904 from the Imperial Russian Geographical Society in Saint Petersburg by the American Geographical Society. The strips flying in the wind in the upper left foreground are prayer flags, and crowds of ...
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University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries
Report of the Feast Hosted by the Prince of Piedmonte in Valladolid in the Presence of Your Majesty and the Queen Our Lady
Relacion delas fiestas qve delante de sv magestad, y dela reyna nvestra señora hizo, y mantuuo el Principe del Piamonte en Valladolid (Report of the feast hosted by the prince of Piedmonte in Valladolid in the presence of  Your Majesty and the queen our lady) was published in Lima, Peru, in 1605. The first printing press in South America was established in Lima by Antonio Ricardo (circa 1540−1606), an Italian who had worked for a time as a printer with the Jesuits in Mexico City. This book is part ...
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National Library of Peru
Chinese Children at the Tjap-Gomeh Festival in Makassar
This photograph shows Chinese children participating in the Tjap Go Meh Festival in Makassar, the largest city on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. Tjap Go Meh, which takes place 15 days after Chinese New Year, was widely celebrated among Chinese immigrants in Indonesia, and became popular with the local population as well. Also known as the Lantern Festival, it involves parades and performances similar to those on the new year. The picture was taken by the studio of British photographers Walter Bentley Woodbury and James Page, who arrived in the ...
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Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and the Caribbean Studies KITLV
View from the Bell Tower of the Trinity Cathedral (of the Trinity Monastery) on Cathedral Square in Belgorod, during the Celebration of the Canonization of Ioasaf of Belgorod, September 4, 1911
This photograph of a solemn procession in honor of the canonization of the Ioasaf Belgorodskii was taken in September 1911, in the city of Belgorod. Born Ioakim Andreevich Gorlenko on September 8 (19), 1705, to parents of distinguished Cossack lineage, Ioasaf of Belgorod entered the Kiev Spiritual Academy in 1713 and accepted the monastic calling in 1727. In 1744 he was bestowed the title “Archimandrite” by Empress Elizabeth and served at the Trinity Lavra of Saint Sergius (monastery) near Moscow. In 1748 he became Bishop of Belgorod and Oboyan. After ...
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Library of Congress
'Id (Feast Day) Poem
This calligraphic panel includes a ruba'i (iambic pentameter quatrain), signed and dated in the lower-left corner by the calligrapher Mir Muhammad Salih: “written by Mir Muhammad Salih, 1225” (AD 1810). Although little is known about the calligrapher, the date proves that this work dates from the early 19th century. The text is executed in black (Indian) naskh script on a beige sheet of paper, framed in a blue border decorated with gold leaf and vine motifs. Before the quatrain begins, a short invocation of God that reads "he is ...
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Library of Congress
'Id (Feast Day) Prayer
This calligraphic fragment includes a poetical prayer wishing its owner happiness and prosperity on the occasion of the 'id (also seen as 'Id and Eid) festival of Noruz (New Year). Beginning with a (now barely legible) invocation to huwa ar-Raheem (God as the Glorious), the verses then read: “Oh, your face is 'id and your eyebrow is the moon of 'id / May your month and year be auspicious and happy / May my eye not be bright without seeing you / The arch of your eyebrow is the prayer direction of (all ...
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Library of Congress
Noruz (New Year’s) Poem
This calligraphic panel includes a ruba'i (iambic pentameter quatrain) signed by the calligrapher Agha'i. He has signed his work: "written by the poor Agha'i." Unfortunately, nothing is known about this calligrapher, and the approximate date of the piece (17th−18th centuries) must remain conjectural. The quatrain is written in black nasta'liq script on a piece of paper framed in blue and pasted to a brown paper strengthened with cardboard. The poem reads as follows: “For you, Pride of Government and Religion / May happiness be your aide ...
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Library of Congress
'Id (Feast Day) Blessing
This calligraphic panel executed in nasta'liq script on a beige paper sprinkled with gold flecks is provided with a (water-damaged) frame and is pasted to a brown piece of paper strengthened with cardboard. Between the two lines of calligraphy, which offer a prayer to a ruler on the occasion of 'id (also seen as 'Id and Eid), appears another small fragment cut out and pasted in the center right. It reads: "In the name of Muhammad and Muhammad's family [prayers upon them].” The two main lines of calligraphy ...
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Library of Congress
'Id (Feast Day) Quatrain
This calligraphic fragment shows a ruba'i (iambic pentameter quatrain), written in nasta'liq script by the calligrapher Muhammad Qamar al-Din. He has signed the quatrain in the lower-left corner with the expression "katabahu [written by] Muhammad Qamar al-Din." Nothing is known about this calligrapher, although the steady nasta'liq script suggests that it was executed in Persia (Iran) during the 16th or 17th centuries. The text is framed by cloud bands executed in black ink and highlighted with gold paint, around which a blue frame with interlacing gold vine ...
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Library of Congress
The Gold and Silver Artificers of Philadelphia. In Civic Procession, 22 February 1832
The event shown in this lithograph is the civic procession held in Philadelphia on February 22, 1832, in honor of the centennial anniversary of George Washington's birth. Onlookers cheer the participants in front of the Second Bank on Chestnut Street, between 4th and 5th Streets. City officials and other prominent people of Philadelphia lead the parade, followed by tradesmen, volunteer fire companies, and the military. The top-hatted artisans (the artificers of the title, who struck special commemorative medals for the event) are led by a mounted parade marshal, their ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia