34 results in English
Engagement in the Khost Country from a Drawing
This photograph of a drawing of a military engagement near Khost (now Khowst), Afghanistan, is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. The identity of the artist is unknown. The image appears to show a skirmish in late 1878–January 1879 that involved the Kurram Valley Field Force fighting against unidentified Afghan adversaries. In the foreground are massed British cavalry and dragoons (mounted infantry), while ahead of them infantrymen fire upon the enemy in the distance. A section of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Elephant Battery on the March
This photograph is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Elephants were commonly used as shock cavalry in the front lines of military campaigns throughout South and Southeast Asia until the end of the 19th century, when the introduction of advanced artillery and Gatling guns made them vulnerable to enemy fire. The British Indian Army, like their Mughal imperial predecessors, used war elephants to transport large quantities of cargo, but the main advantage of the elephant in late-19th-century military tactics ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Hatamoto (Senior Samurai of the Shogun) Corps Formation Rules
Presented here is an emaki (horizontal picture scroll) that depicts a battle formation procession setting off for the battlefield. It is 13 meters long. At first sight, it resembles the Kan’ei Gyōkoki (Record of an imperial visit in the Kan’ei period), in which pictures and letters are printed in type. However, the characters and horses were not printed in type, but were affixed using stamps. The actual number of stamps used is surprisingly small. The 54 mounted soldiers in the scroll were created from just five stamps, but ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
The European War
This print showing a battle between troops on horseback is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “A brave detachment of Cossacks destroyed German hussars near Sochaczew.” Lubok is a Russian word for popular prints created from woodcuts, engravings, etchings, or later, by using lithography. The prints were often characterized by simple, colorful graphics depicting a narrative, and could also include text. Lubok gained popularity in Russia beginning in the late 17th century. The prints, which often depicted narratives from ...
Contributed by The British Library
A Battle Near Vladimir-Volynsk
This print showing a battle near Volodymyr-Volynsky (present-day Ukraine) is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “Enemy artillery, firing over its own cavalry, shelled the trenches in front of the city occupied by our troops. The Austrians were quickly approaching. A terrible moment arrived. Hungarian cavalry, arrayed in a wide semi-circle in front of the city, bravely raced forward. It seemed that after a few minutes they would enter the city. But loud sounds and strange crackling were heard ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Battle of Ardahan
This print showing the Battle of Ardahan (in present-day Turkey) is from the collection of World War I Russian lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “On the night of December 20, our troops, while fighting, force-marched to Ardahan from two sides—from the west and the north. There was a heavy fog. The Turks, firmly settled in the trenches, met our troops with an outpouring of bullets and shrapnel. Late at night the commanding officer of the western detachment led his troops on an assault of ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Defeat of the Austrian Army Near L'viv
This print showing a battle between the Russian and Austrian armies near L’viv (in present-day Ukraine; at that time the city of Lemberg in Austria-Hungary) is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “According to the headquarters of the commander in chief, after a seven day battle, our army took advanced and heavily fortified positions near L’viv, 15–20 versts east of the city, and approached the main L’viv forts. After very heavy fighting on August 19 ...
Contributed by The British Library
A Heroic Feat by Non-commissioned Officer Avvakum Volkov, Who Captured the Austrian Flag
This print showing Russian troops fighting Austrians is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “Avvakum Volkov, a volunteer non-commissioned officer, Full Cavalier of Saint George, was brought to one of the Moscow military hospitals. For his outstanding bravery he was granted a promotion and a reward of 500 rubles. Volkov earned his last two honors in battles against the Austrians. Accompanied by seven soldiers, Volkov went on a reconnaissance mission and soon encountered Austrian dragoons, nine enlisted men, one ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Great European War. The Battle of Augustów. German Troops Crossing the Neman
This print showing German troops crossing the Neman River at the Battle of Augustów (in present-day Poland) is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “From the report from the headquarters of the Chief of Staff. The Battle of Augustów ended with a victory on September 20. The Germans' defeat was complete, and now they are retreating to the borders of East Prussia in a disorderly manner. Our valiant troops vigorously pursued the enemy, who is leaving behind wagons, guns ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Great European War. A Heroic Feat by Cossack Gumilov, Who Rescued a Wounded Officer
This print showing the rescue of a wounded Russian officer is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “Some of the wounded brought to Petrograd from the Austrian battlefields told an interesting story about a heroic feat by the Cossack Gumilov. The Cossack took part in the Battle of L’viv. Together with three of his friends he reached the woods, where they drove off some Austrian cavalrymen. Gumilov went ahead and came to the edge of the forest. A ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Heroic Feat of Don Cossack Kuzma Kryuchkov During a Fight with German Cavalrymen
This print showing cavalry engaged in combat is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “A small patrol of six Cossacks crossed the Prussian border and unexpectedly stumbled upon enemy cavalry, consisting of 30 riders. Two of our Cossacks went to report to their superiors, and four stayed behind. The four were: Ostakhov, Shchegolkov, Ivankov and Kuzma Kryuchkov. They mounted their horses and rushed upon the Germans with loud war cries. Confusion stirred among the Prussians. They shouted: ‘Kashlany, kashla ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Defeat of the Turks near Sarikamish
This print showing a 1914 battle scene near Sarikamish, showing fighting between the Russians and the Turkish army, is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “After fierce battles, the main forces of the Turkish army, having been surrounded by our troops behind Sarikamish, laid down their weapons. This glorious victory of our Caucasian Army, like thunder, struck the German leaders. We defeated two Turkish corps. One of these corps was captured entirely with the corps commanders, three chiefs of ...
Contributed by The British Library
А Bloody Battle with the Germans at Vítkovice
This print showing a battle between Russians and Germans at Vítkovice is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “Bloody Kaiser Wilhelm II had long promised his barbaric hordes that they would one day plunder the beautiful Warsaw. Twice, the Germans rushed to the city, but each time they were repulsed with heavy losses. A trench war began. The rivers Bzura, Rawka, upper Pilica, and Nida marked the line of contact between us and the Germans. The Germans wanted to ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Defeat of the Germans on the River Bzura
This print showing the defeat of Germans at the river Bzura is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “In three previous battles, the defeated German army was unable to conduct a full and broad offensive against our invincible army along the front line at ​​the river Bzura. The Germans were limited to separate attacks, and as a result, their hordes remained on the left bank of the Bzura. The sacrifices made by the Germans on the Bzura are enormous ...
Contributed by The British Library
A Heroic Fight of the Cossack Kuzma Kryuchkov with 11 Germans
This print showing a lone cavalryman inflicting mortal wounds on the enemy is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “All of Russia knows about the feat of Kuzma Kryuchkov, a Don Cossack. He valiantly upheld the military glory of Russian Cossacks, who instill fear in the enemies of Russia. A squad of six Cossacks, including Kryuchkov, was sent scouting from Kolvari near the Prussian border. They stumbled upon a detachment of Prussian cavalrymen consisting of 27 men. Two Cossacks ...
Contributed by The British Library
A Battle at Gorodok
This print showing a battle with cavalry at Gorodok (present-day Horodok, Ukraine) is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains, in the words of an August 6 report from the General Staff at Saint Petersburg: “At noon on August 4, an Austrian division approached the line at Gorodok-Kuzmin. Our cavalrymen initiated a fight with the enemy at Gorodok, which lasted for five hours. Our fire and cavalry attacks inflicted losses on the enemy. The whole field is covered with the ...
Contributed by The British Library
Kuzma Kryuchkov, the First Cavalier of the St. George Cross
This print showing a cavalry battle and the cavalier Kuzma Kryuchkov atop a white horse is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “The famous first cavalier to receive the Saint George's Cross in the current war, Cossack Kuzma Kryuchkov was born in 1888 into an Old Believer family on the Nizhne-Kalmykov farm in Ust-Khoperskaia village, in Ust-Medveditskii county. A Cossack scouting squad, which Kryuchkov was a part of, safely crossed the border. The enemy was nowhere to be ...
Contributed by The British Library
Russia's War with Germany and Austria-Hungary
This print showing a clash between the infantry and cavalry of two opposing forces is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains that the image depicts the capture of Yaroslav (present-day Jarosław, Poland) by the Russian Army. Lubok is a Russian word for popular prints created from woodcuts, engravings, etchings, or later, by using lithography. The prints were often characterized by simple, colorful graphics depicting a narrative, and could also include text. Lubok gained popularity in Russia beginning in the ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Great Patriotic War of 1914. Battles on the Vistula River at Ivangorod
This print showing a battle scene on the Vistula River at Ivangorod is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains, in words directly from a report from the headquarters of the Russian commander in chief: “The battle at Ivangorod ended in our total victory. The defeat of the Germans is complete and they are currently retreating to the border of East Prussia in a disorderly manner. Our valiant troops vigorously pursue the enemy, who leaves behind wagons, guns and ammunition ...
Contributed by The British Library
Russia's War with the Germans. The Heroic Feat of Lieutenant Smirnov
This print showing cavalry racing into a lake is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “During the bloody fighting at the Masurian Lakes, a battery, commanded by Lieutenant Smirnov, was surrounded by German troops. The only way out was into the lake. Not wanting to be captured, the battery, on the order of Smirnov, gripped the caissons and pushed them into the lake, thereby not allowing the enemy to take possession of any of our guns. Smirnov and the ...
Contributed by The British Library
Russia's War with the Germans. The Capture of L'viv in Galicia
This print showing the capture of L’viv (in present-day Ukraine) is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “After a fierce battle on August 18 and 19 near L’viv, the Austrian army was completely destroyed and forced to retreat. We captured 200 guns, wagons, and a great number of prisoners. On August 21, at 11:00 a.m., our gallant troops, who were pursuing the fleeing enemy, entered the city of L’viv.” Lubok is a Russian word ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Attack on Sarikamish. The War with Turkey
This print showing the Russian advance on the Turks at Sarikamish is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “At dawn on December 17, we bombarded the village of Verkhniy Sarikamish by artillery fire. The Turks fiercely defended the village for three days, after which our scouts set fire to a house on the edge of the village. Two companies of one of our glorious Caucasian regiments rushed into the attack. The Turks suffered a huge loss in dead, including ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Germans' Retreat in East Prussia
This print showing German soldiers retreating from advancing Russians is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “Our troops captured Bakałarzewo and seized large quantities of weapons, equipment, and ammunition. Some of the weapons were seized in the aslant position. On the left bank of the Vistula River, the Germans hastily continue moving to the border. A sharp turn is evident on the East Prussian front since October 21. The enemy, who took the defensive along the entire front line ...
Contributed by The British Library
Defeat of the German Troops at Gumbinnen
This print showing a cavalry battle at Gumbinnen (present-day Gusev, Russia) is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “In East Prussia on August 4, 5, 6, and 7, 1914, a fierce battle was fought. It culminated in a brilliant victory of the Russian troops on the banks of the Rominte River. German forces consisted of 100,000 men and 384 guns, but our army rapidly took the offensive. After a fierce fight on August 7, we captured Gumbinnen despite ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Battle with the Germans Near Lipsko
This print showing a battle between Germans and Russians near Lipsko, Poland is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “While our valiant troops were destroying the Austro-German army under [General Moritz von] Auffenberg and driving it away from the city of Lublin beyond the San River, a German unit consisting of three divisions rushed to the rescue in the direction of Kielce toward the left bank of the Vistula River. Met by our troops on the Izit River near ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Great European War. On the Austrian Front. A Campaign in Hungary
This print showing a battle scene in a valley with a town and hills rising in the distance is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “Our troops descended into the Nagyag Valley in the Carpathian Mountains. The Austrian detachment positioned at Mikulice was thrown back and lost machine guns and other weapons. On September 18, our cavalry had some impressive gains in the Carpathian Mountains: it attacked the enemy trenches, captured them, smashed the enemy infantry, and caused the ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Great War. A Skirmish between the Cossacks and the Austrians during the Capture of Galich
This print showing a scene of close combat involving infantry, cavalry, and explosions during the capture of Galich (in present-day Ukraine), is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “From the headquarters of the Commander in Chief. From August 4 to 21, our left flank covered 220 versts, while on August 7 it was engaged in a continuous battle with the enemy. The main forces of the enemy established a strong position at Kamenka-Galich, where they were completely destroyed on ...
Contributed by The British Library
Extermination of the German Artillery Battery
This print showing an artillery blast amidst cavalry is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “From November 17 to November 19, along the line of the Masurian Lakes, our troops, having come very close to the artificial barriers installed by the Germans, rained fierce artillery fire upon the enemy in the passages between the lakes. After a series of attacks, they captured some areas, which led to the complete destruction of the enemy batteries. We captured ammunition, a few ...
Contributed by The British Library
Germans Destroyed by Horses
This print showing horses trampling a group of German soldiers is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “In one of the battles in the Alsatian theater of the war, at Gwaldikonen, the Germans settled on a small hill and installed their field artillery there. The French tried to attack several times but they were unable to get closer. The French lancers rushed onto the battery, but were killed. Suddenly the horses, with the riders gone, galloped onto the battery ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Battle of Przemyśl
This print showing a clash between Austrian and Russian troops is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “The battle, which began on October 1 between our troops and the Austrians on the Galician front, continued with great tenacity on October 4, 5, and 6. The Austrians conducted a particularly intense attack along the front line of Sanok/Stare Miasto-Stryi, south of Przemyśl. Bayonets were used often. On the night of October 4 to October 5, in the vicinity of ...
Contributed by The British Library
The Defeat of the Turks on the Erzurum Front
This print showing a battle scene with cavalry and infantry is from the collection of World War I lubok posters held at the British Library. The caption explains: “Our infantry units and the glorious Caucasian Cossacks defeated the Turkish army with a lightning-like attack in the direction of Erzurum. All of the Turkish regiments from the 28th and 29th Divisions lost almost half of their men. Two battalions were completely destroyed. The 102nd Regiment and the 23rd and 24th Cavalry Regiments also had heavy losses. The regiments of the 34th ...
Contributed by The British Library
European Cavalry Battle Scene
This is the first in a pair of original gouache paintings by F. Oetinger showing a violent cavalry battle during the Seven Years' War (1756-63), a conflict that involved all the major European powers and was fought on the European continent as well as in the colonies; it became known as the first global war. As a result of the conflict, France lost most of its North American colonies, Prussia reemerged as the dominant power in Europe, and Great Britain emerged as the world’s most powerful nation. The painting ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
Royal Farewell to the Imperial Yeomanry: the Prince of Wales Shaking Hands with the Officers
This wash drawing on paper, mounted on board, is by Henry Marriott Paget (1856-1936), who created it for the British illustrated weekly newspaper, the Graphic, where it appeared on February 3, 1900. The drawing shows Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VII), saying farewell to the soldiers of the Imperial Yeomanry, a volunteer cavalry regiment established to fight in the Boer War. The first contingent of soldiers left for South Africa in February 1900. Paget was one of three brothers--Henry, Sidney Edward (1860-1908), and Walter Stanley ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
At the Front! Every Fit Briton Should Join Our Brave Men at the Front. Enlist Now
Until March 2, 1916, when the Military Service Act introduced conscription, Great Britain’s World War I army was comprised entirely of volunteers. Many of the most famous wartime posters were recruitment appeals. This 1915 poster, published in London for the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, shows cavalry in battle, with horses reacting to an explosion in the foreground. It calls upon every physically and mentally fit Briton to enlist. The Parliamentary Recruiting Committee was set up following the outbreak of war in August 1914. A cross-party organization chaired by the prime ...
Contributed by Library of Congress