25 results
Region Between Amazon River and São Paulo
This pen-and-ink watercolor map shows the course of the Amazon River, including its minor tributaries and the towns located along its banks. Although much of the area along the Amazon was controlled by indigenous people through the early colonial period, settlers established towns along the riverbanks to support trade and exploration into Brazil’s interior. The largest of these towns was Belem, which appears on the map.
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National Library of Brazil
Map in Which the Rivers on Argentina, Parana and Paraguay are Described Most Exactly for the First Time, When a Beginning was Made by the New Colony as Far as the Mouth of the Jauru River
This atlas of colonial South America is by Miguel Antonio Ciera. A noted mathematician and professor of astronomy at the University of Coimbra in Portugal, Ciera was part of an expedition sent to demarcate the border between Spanish and Portuguese holdings in South America following signature of the 1750 Treaty of Madrid and the 1756 Guarani War. The atlas focuses on the southern part of the continent, in the watershed of the Paraná River, where the borders were most disputed. The territory in the atlas includes present-day Argentina and Paraguay ...
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National Library of Brazil
The Bay of All Saints
This map by Joan Blaeu (1596-1673), one of the most important Dutch cartographers, shows the Bay of All Saints off the coast of Brazil. The bay was named by Amerigo Vespucci, who is said to have entered it on All Saints’ Day, November 1, in the year 1501. Located on the bay is the city of Salvador.
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National Library of Brazil
Geographic Map of Brazil
This map of Brazil was published by Giovanni Battista Albrizzi (1698-1777), a prominent Venetian publisher of books and maps. The notes on the map, in Italian, include various speculative remarks about the people and the geography of the interior of Brazil, then still largely unknown to Europeans. Albrizzi, who inherited his business from his father, was part of a family active in publishing and bookselling in Venice for 150 years. He played an important role in the intellectual life of the city and edited a weekly bulletin, Novelle della Repubblica ...
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National Library of Brazil
Course of the São [Francisco] River and the Navigation Along It from São Paulo to the Pitangui Mines
This early-18th century manuscript map shows the São Francisco River in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state. In this period, the Portuguese sent numerous expeditions up the São Francisco and its tributaries in search of gold, silver, and diamonds.
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National Library of Brazil
Village and Square of Santos
This drawing shows the village of Santos in the Brazilian state of São Paulo. The village was established in 1546 and quickly became an export site for coffee. The drawing is done with Nanquim ink, a type of ink developed in China and used for colloidal drawings and watercolors. It involves suspending carbon particles in water and stabilizing it with some type of glue.
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National Library of Brazil
Topographic Map of the Principal Entry to the Amazon River
This manuscript topographic map shows the main outlet of the Amazon River into the Atlantic Ocean. The river's estuary is more than 330 kilometers wide. Early explorers called it the “sweet sea” because of the vast amount of fresh water pouring into the ocean. The map is the work of João Vasco Manuel de Braun, a Brazilian of English descent who served as governor of Macapá, the equatorial region in which the mouth of the Amazon is located.
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National Library of Brazil
Map of the City of Rio de Janeiro, with the Essential Part of the Port and All Fortified Places
This manuscript map shows the city of Rio de Janeiro spread along the shores of Guanabara Bay. The map, which is the work of José Correia Rangel de Bulhões, emphasizes the defenses of the city and the port. Rio de Janeiro displaced Salvador as Brazil’s most important port after gold and diamonds were discovered in nearby Minas Gerais province in 1720. The city became the colonial capital in 1763.
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National Library of Brazil
Topographic Map of New Discovery of the Corner in the Village of Cuiaba
This hand-colored map shows the village of Cuiabá in Brazil’s Mato Grosso state. The town was founded in 1727, after gold was discovered in the region. This map, made more than 40 years later, still shows a small village.
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National Library of Brazil
Plan of the Brazilian Coast from Sohipe to Sao João Island
This manuscript nautical map shows a stretch of the Brazilian coast from the town of Sohipe to São João Island. This coastline today is part of the state of Bahia. Bahia has Brazil’s country’s longest coastline and, during the early colonial period, boasted several important export centers. Features indicated on the map include water-depths, coastal rocks and shoals, and prevailing currents.
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National Library of Brazil
Map of the District of Bahia de Todos os Santos and Its Continuation to the West
This early-18th century manuscript map shows the interior of the Brazilian state of Bahia, at the time still largely uncharted. The Portuguese began to explore this region as early as 1501, and soon developed it into a center for growing and processing sugar. The sugar was exported from several of Bahia's coastal cities, the most important of which was Salvador. Salvador was the first capital of Brazil, until 1763, when Rio de Janeiro became the capital.
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National Library of Brazil
Demonstration of the Tributaries of the São Francisco River, Minas Gerais
This hand-colored manuscript map, made by an unknown cartographer sometime in the early 18th century, shows the tributaries of the São Francisco River in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state. The São Francisco River system, which includes 168 tributaries, is the fourth-largest river system in South America. In the early 18th century, the Portuguese sent numerous expeditions up the São Francisco and its tributaries in search of gold, silver, and diamonds.
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National Library of Brazil
Map of Maranhao, City of São Luis do Maranhão
This manuscript map shows the city of São Luís do Maranhão as it appeared around 1800. Located on Brazil’s northeastern coast, the city predates Brazil’s European colonization. It was a large village of the local Tupinambá people before being taken over by the French in 1612, who renamed it after Saint Louis and in honor of King Louis XIII. Less than three years later, the Portuguese captured the city from the French. Under Portuguese rule, São Luís do Maranhão became the seat of the Diocese of São Luís ...
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Map of Bahia
This early-18th century manuscript map by an unknown cartographer shows the interior of the Brazilian state of Bahia, still largely uncharted at that time. The Portuguese began to explore this region as early as 1501, and soon developed it into a center for growing and processing sugar. The sugar was exported from several of Bahia's coastal cities, the most important of which was Salvador.
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National Library of Brazil
Map of the Southern Part of Brazil
This manuscript map shows the Atlantic coast of southern Brazil from Ilhéus to the Prata River, and the interior with the tributaries of the Paraná, Paraguai, and Uruguay rivers. Also shown are the main churches and chapels in the provinces.
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National Library of Brazil
Demonstration of the São Francisco River in Minas Gerais
This hand-drawn map, made by an unknown cartographer sometime in the early 18th century, shows the São Francisco River in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state. In the early 18th century, the Portuguese sent numerous expeditions up the São Francisco and its tributaries in search of gold, silver, and diamonds.
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National Library of Brazil
Topographic Map of Part of Ilheos District
This early-18th century topographic map shows the Ilhéus district in the northeastern Brazilian state of Bahia. The region, also known as Ihéus and São Jorge dos Ilhéus, was the center of Brazil’s sugar production during the colonial period.
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National Library of Brazil
Map of Doce and Jequitinhonha Rivers Copied from Documents Found in the House of Representatives
This 19th-century map shows the Doce and Jequitinhonha rivers and their tributaries in the southeastern Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. The map, which was copied from an older original, is the work of José Raimundo da Cunha Matos (1776-1839), a Brazilian military historian and founding member of the Brazilian Historical and Geographic Institute. Although Minas Gerais is best known for the gold and diamond mines that gave the region its name, agriculture became more important to the regional economy over the course of the 19th century, as the mines were ...
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Map of the Prata River
This 18th-century Portuguese map shows the Rio da Prata, located in present-day Argentina and Uruguay. Who made the map, and for what purpose, is unknown.
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National Library of Brazil
Maps of the Border Region Between the States of Rio of Janeiro, Minas Gerais and São Paulo, and of the Course of the São Francisco River
This map shows an area near the end of the São Francisco River. The river originates in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state and travels some 3,160 kilometers to the Atlantic Ocean.
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National Library of Brazil
Map of the Region of Minas Gerais with a Part of the Way from São Paulo and of Rio de Janeiro to the Mines, Showing Tributaries of the São Francisco River
This map shows navigable routes to the mines of the southeastern Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. During the 18th century, when this map was drawn, the region’s gold and diamond mines attracted thousands of prospectors. The Portuguese crown financed the construction of a road through the mining regions, from Rio de Janeiro to the diamond center, Diamantina, and strictly controlled traffic on the road. The region was also accessible via the São Francisco River, which begins in Minas Gerais.
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National Library of Brazil