11 results in English
Constantinople
This colored travel sketch of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) as seen from the eastern part of the town of Scutari (present-day Üsküdar) across the Bosporus Strait is by the Danish painter Martinus Rørbye (1803–48), a central figure in the "Golden Age" of Danish art (circa 1770–1900). After training at the Kunstakademiet, Rørbye travelled widely, to France, Italy, Greece, and Turkey. In 1833 he was one of the first artists to paint in Skagen, in the far north of Denmark, some 45 years before it became an artists’ haven. He ...
Kara-Keui (Galata) Bridge, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Galata Bridge spanning the Golden Horn on the western side of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the bridge, which links the Stambul and Galata districts of the city, was “originally built of timber in 1845, and called Sultan Valideh Bridge after its founder (the ‘sultan’s mother’), and was rebuilt in ...
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Kara-Keui (Galata) and View of Pera, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the neighborhood of Kara-Keui (Galata) in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) with a view of Pera is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). One theory, among others, is that the name Galata derives from the Italian term calata (descent), which would be fitting for the neighborhood of steep streets with many stairs sloping down to the Golden Horn. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers states that Pera ...
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A Part of the Eyoub (i.e., Uyüp) Cemetery, I, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Uyüp (now Eyüp) Cemetery in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described the cemetery and its mosque as having been “built of white marble by Mohammed II, the Conqueror, in 1459, adjacent to the türbeh of Abu Eyúb Ensari, the legendary standard-bearer of the prophet, whose tomb here was revealed in a vision a ...
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A Part of the Eyoub (i.e., Uyüp) Cemetery, II, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Uyüp (now Eyüp) Cemetery in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Eyüp takes its name from Abū Ayyūb al-Anṣārī (died circa 672), the standard bearer and companion of the Prophet Muhammad, whose tomb is located here, together with a mosque built in his honor. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers describes how “from the mosque, up the hill-side to the ...
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View from the Bridge, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print showing a view of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) from the Galata Bridge is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The large building in the top left of the image is Hagia Sophia (Aya Sofya), originally a Greek Orthodox basilica, later an imperial mosque, and in modern times a museum. According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the Galata Bridge spanning the Golden Horn between the Stambul ...
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Stamboul, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The print shows the inner district of Stambul, as seen from across the Golden Horn. The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described Stambul as “the chief seat of the Oriental merchants and the petty traders” in Constantinople, where “the old Oriental characteristics of the city still survive,” despite the ravages of “destructive fires (as in ...
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Yeni-Djama (i.e., Yeni Cami) by Moonlight, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Yeni Valide Camii (New Mosque of the Sultan’s Mother) in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The mosque adjoins the harbor on the southern bank of the Golden Horn by the Galata Bridge. It was begun in 1597 by Safiye, mother of Mehmed III, and finished in 1663 by order of Turhan Hatice, mother of Mehmed IV, placing it in a tradition of architectural commissions by Ottoman sultan ...
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Bosphorus (i.e. Bosporus), View from Kuleli, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Bosporus in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This view shows the Bosporus from the Asian shore, looking across from Kuleli and Kandilli to Roumeli Hissar on the western or European side. Roumeli Hissar Castle commands the narrowest part of the Bosporus and was built by Sultan Mehmed II in 1452 as he made plans to lay siege to Constantinople. At the time this photograph was taken, Kandilli was ...
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Bosphorus (i.e. Bosporus), Rumeli and Anadali-Hissar (i.e., Anadolu Hissari), Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). It shows the castles of Hisari (Anatolian Castle) and Roumeli Hissar, located across from each other on the narrowest part of Bosporus, the waterway that connects the Sea of Marmora with the Black Sea. Anadolu Hisari is on the Anatolian, or Asian, side of the Bosporus, and was built by Ottoman sultan Bayezid I in the mid 1390s as part of his preparations to ...
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The Golden Horn, Constantinople, Turkey
This photochrome print of the Golden Horn in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul) is part of “Views of People and Sites in Turkey” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Chrysokeras, Greek for the Golden Horn, was the name for this inlet of the sea already in Byzantine times. The waterway is 800 meters across at its widest point and 7.24 kilometers long, forming one of the finest natural harbors in the world and joining the Bosporus just where it enters the Sea of Marmara. In Byzantine times, the ...
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