41 results in English
Recommended Facilities for Search and Rescue, Middle East Region
This map was prepared for the Middle East Region Air Navigation Meeting of the Provisional International Civil Aviation Organization (PICAO), which took place in Cairo, Egypt, in October 1946. It shows political borders and recommended facilities for search and rescue, including rescue-coordinating and rescue-alerting centers, bases for different types of search-and-rescue aircraft, and facilities for surface vessels. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) was established under a convention signed by 52 countries at the November 1944 International Civil Aviation Conference in Chicago. From August 1945 to August 1947, as the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Port of La Luz and the City of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
This watercolor landscape, painted in about 1889, is by Eliseo Meifrèn y Roig (1859−1940), a Catalonian artist who specialized in impressionist marine seascapes. It represents a partial view of the Bay of La Isleta and Puerto de La Luz, near the northeast tip of the island of Gran Canaria, with the house of the maritime pilot and the English barges that supplied the coal trade. In the distance is the town of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, capital of the Spanish province of Las Palmas. The Puerto de La ...
A Fortified Pass. Colonel Wetherall Advancing to the Capture of Saint-Charles
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Passage of the Richelieu River by Night
This engraving depicts a scene from the rebellions of 1837−38 in Canada, which were sparked by dissatisfaction with the political status quo. Discontent raged in particular over British dominance of the affairs of what were then still two separate colonies, Lower Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Quebec) and Upper Canada (the southern portion of the present-day province of Ontario). In the rebellion, the reform leaders of Lower Canada, the most prominent being Louis Joseph Papineau (1786−1871), drew on long-simmering political tensions to recruit a ...
Wakulla Springs Glass-Bottom Boat Tour Chant by Luke Smith
The sound recording presented here features a chant recited by Luke Smith at the 1981 Florida Folk Festival in White Springs, Florida. Smith, a longtime guide on the Wakulla River, sings about the underwater environment and summons fish to the boat. His chant is reminiscent of African-American spirituals and field hollers common throughout the Deep South of the United States. Alligators, snakes, rare birds, and native exoticism are part of Florida’s tourism industry. Narrated boat tours at sites such as Wakulla Springs State Park, located at the spring south ...
Polotsk. Nikolaevskii Cathedral from the Left Bank of the Western Dvina
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Fish Market, Bergen, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows the Bergen fish market as it looked in the last decade of the 19th century. According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers, “fish has always been the staple commodity of Bergen, which is the greatest fish-mart in Norway. The Hanseatic merchants compelled the northern fishermen to send their fish to Bergen, and to the present day the trade still flows mainly ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Persian Tatars. Saatly. Mugan Steppe
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Damage from the Hurricane of 1906
The sixth hurricane of 1906 was one of 11 hurricanes or tropical cyclones that Atlantic hurricane season. The storm made landfall on September 27, 1906, west of Biloxi, Mississippi, but wreaked its greatest damage from Mobile, Alabama to Pensacola, Florida. The Category 4 hurricane was the most destructive storm to strike the Pensacola area in 170 years. Winds in excess of 105 miles (170 kilometers) per hour stretched past the city and port of Pensacola, and Escambia Bay in the Gulf of Mexico saw a storm surge as high as ...
Place du Chatelet, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Place du Châtelet in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This public square is located on what was once the site of the medieval fortress of Grand Châtelet, which was built around 1130 by King Louis VI to defend the Ile de la Cité, the island in the River Seine that constitutes the historic center of Paris. Later in the 12th century, the fortress became a prison, which it ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Hôtel de Ville, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Hôtel de Ville, or Paris city hall, is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The building depicted is the reconstructed version of the original Hôtel de Ville, which was built in 1533 and destroyed in 1871 during the upheavals of the Paris Commune. The reconstruction, undertaken by the French architects Theodore Ballu (1817–85) and Edouard Deperthes (1833–98), took place between 1876 and 1884 and resulted in an enlarged and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Place de la Concorde, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Place de la Concorde is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1900 edition of Baedeker’s Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers informed its readers that this famous square was 390 yards long and 235 yards wide, and was bounded on the south by the River Seine, on the west by the Champs-Elysees, on the north by the Ministère de la Marine and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Kremlin towards the Place Rouge, Moscow, Russia
This photochrome print of the Moscow Kremlin is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Kremlin is the seat of the Russian government. The word kremlin comes from the Russian for “fortification” or “citadel.” The first settlement on this site, a wooden fort, was built by the founder of Moscow, Yuri Dolgoruky, in 1147, but the structure was not given the name Kremlin until 1331. As described by Baedeker’s Russia with ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
From the Ramparts of the Kremlin, Nigni-Novgorod, (i.e., Nizhnii Novgorod), Russia
This photochrome print of the ramparts of the Kremlin (fortress) in Nizhnii Novgorod is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located at the confluence of the Oka and Volga rivers in western Russia, Nizhnii-Novgorod was the capital of the Nizhnii-Novgorod principality from 1350 onward. The Kremlin constituted the political and historical center of the city. As described in Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914), the Kremlin “occupies the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Castle and Mediaeval Market Town, Turin, Italy
This photochrome print of a medieval castle and market town is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Situated along the Po River in the Piedmont region of northern Italy, Turin was the site of the 1884 Esposizione Generale Italiana Artistica e Industriale (Italian General Art and Industrial Exhibition). The exhibition featured a medieval castle, the Castello Mediaevale, and the medieval marketplace, Borgo Mediaevale, which were intended to convey to visitors an impression of life in the Middle ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A View of Nakazu
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. Utagawa Toyoharu (1735–1814) was the founder of the Utagawa school ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Church of Saint George. Staraia Ladoga. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Ostrechiny. Study. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Voznesene Road. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Three Men in Boat Transporting Bananas to the City Markets, Panama
This photograph depicting a scene in Panama is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Embankment in the City of Cherepovets. Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’sconfluence with the Volga at the city of Rybinsk. Much of that length is now submerged by two large reservoirs created in the in the mid 20th century as a part of Soviet river navigation and hydroelectric policy. Between the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Small Town of Vokhnovo. Reinforced Embankment. Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. Much of that length, and the villages along it, were submerged by two large reservoirs created in the mid 20th century as a part of Soviet navigation and hydroelectric policy ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Navigable Stretch of the Kura River at Petropavlovskoe. A Dock. Mugan Steppe
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Rapid Sosnovets on the Onda River
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Among the natural features near this route was the Lower (Nizhnii) Vyg River, which flows 102 kilometers from Lake Vygozero in Karelia to the Onega Bay of the White Sea. Seen here are the Ugolnyi (“coal”) Rapids on the small Soroka River, an arm of the Lower Vyg River near ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Study: Nets
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This image, entitled “etude” (study) by the photographer, was taken at a fishing settlement in a village near the route named Soroka (now Belomorsk), located near the White Sea. Visible in front of the log shed are fishing nets hung to dry. On the bank is a small boat of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Bay (near the Village of Soroki)
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. Seen in this image is a fishing village near the route named Soroka (now Belomorsk, located in the Republic of Karelia). First recorded in 1419 as part of the domains of Novgorod, the village is situated on a group of islands formed by the Soroka River, an arm of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
City of Yekaterinburg. Pond Embankment
From 1909 to 1912, Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) made several trips to the territory around the Ural Mountains, where he photographed railroad installations, factories, and urban scenes. This 1909 photograph shows an embankment along City Pond in the town of Yekaterinburg (named Sverdlovsk 1924–91). The pond was created in 1724 when the engineer Georg Wilhelm de Gennin (Hennin) dammed the Iset River to create a power source for an iron factory established by order of Peter the Great in 1723. The settlement that sprung up around ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Photo-Panoramic View of Constantinople
Hatchik “Christopher” Oscanyan (born 1818) was an author, diplomat, and publisher of the first Armenian-language newspaper in Constantinople. A native of Constantinople, Oscanyan was educated in New York City, to which he would later return as Ottoman consul-general. He energetically promoted the Ottoman Empire in a variety of media, including a London exhibition entitled the “Oriental and Turkish Museum” (1853), a popular book entitled The Sultan and His People (1887), and photographs such as this one. “Panoramic” photographs employ a variety of techniques to create a wide angle of view ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Fishing Settlements on Lake Seliger
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
View of the Volga River from the Site of an Old Town near Staritsa
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Site of the Confluence of the Shosha River with the Volga River
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Razsoshka River, Flowing into the Chusovaia River at the Village of Verkhnie Gorodki
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View of Chusovaia Factories and Railroad Bridge
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kukushkin Rock. Chusovaia River
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Confluence of the Irtysh and Tobol Rivers. Tobolsk
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Tver'. Left: Otroch Monaster, Ekaterininskaia Church, Church of Saints. Mina, Victor and Vincent. Right: Church of the Nativity of Christ in Rybaki
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Downtown Tver'. Visible Is the Church of the Resurrection (of the Three Confessors)
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Downtown Tver'. Visible Are the Church of the Resurrection (of the Three Confessors) and an Old Bridge
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sultan Bin Zayed I Mosque
This 1960s photograph shows the Shaykh Sultan bin Zayed I Mosque in Al-Bateen, a neighborhood of the city of Abu Dhabi. In the foreground are mahāmil, a type of fishing boat used in the Arabian Gulf. The photograph is from the Colonel Edward "Tug" Bearby Wilson Collection in the National Library, Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage, and was taken by Wilson. Colonel Tug Wilson (1921–2009) was a British army officer who, in the 1960s, was seconded to the government of Abu Dhabi to help build the national ...
Village on the Banks of the Meta River, Province of Casanare
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) appears to show a scene from one of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission) expeditions in the province of Casanare (present-day Casanare Department), Colombia. A small group of indigenous people are engaged in preparing a meal alongside two men from the commission. One man is reading a map; the other is examining a gun. The scene is placed on the banks of the River Meta. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and ...
View of the Caquetá River near the Port of Descansé, Caquetá Territory
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a party of Amerindians crossing the Caquetá River on a flat-bottomed boat, while two others, perhaps fishermen, are busy on the bank. The Caquetá River rises in fertile, mountainous southwestern Colombia and becomes a major waterway as it flows east across the country’s vast plains. In Brazil, where it is called the Japurá, it ultimately joins the Amazon. The region of Caquetá enjoyed special territorial status at times in the 1840s and 1850s. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s ...