Narrow results:

Place

Time Period

Topic

Additional Subjects

Language

Institution

102 results
Iska. Wooden Church
This image is part of an album probably published in about 1920 that contains 20 photographs of scenes in Carpathian Ruthenia, a mountainous region, most of which was part of the Austria-Hungary before World War I, but which became part of the new Czechoslovak state in 1919. Today the largest portion of it forms Zakarpattia Oblast in western Ukraine, with smaller parts in Slovakia and Poland. Shown here is the bell tower and part of the Church of Saint Nicholas the Miracle Worker at Iska (present-day Izky), which dates from ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Torun'. Wooden Church
This image is part of an album probably published in about 1920 that contains 20 photographs of scenes in Carpathian Ruthenia, a mountainous region, most of which was part of the Austria-Hungary before World War I, but which became part of the new Czechoslovak state in 1919. Today the largest portion of it forms Zakarpattia Oblast in western Ukraine, with smaller parts in Slovakia and Poland. Shown here is the bell tower of the Church of Our Lady at Torun` built in 1809. The town is in Mizhhiria District, in ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Iska. Village
This image is part of an album probably published in about 1920 that contains 20 photographs of scenes in Carpathian Ruthenia, a mountainous region, most of which was part of the Austria-Hungary before World War I, but which became part of the new Czechoslovak state in 1919. Today the largest portion of it forms Zakarpattia Oblast in western Ukraine, with smaller parts in Slovakia and Poland. Shown here is a pastoral scene of the cultivated fields and mountains around the village of Iska (present-day Izky) in Mizhhiria District. The baroque ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Yasinya. Wooden Churches
This image is part of an album probably published in about 1920 that contains 20 photographs of scenes in Carpathian Ruthenia, a mountainous region, most of which was part of the Austria-Hungary before World War I, but which became part of the new Czechoslovak state in 1919. Today the largest portion of it forms Zakarpattia Oblast in western Ukraine, with smaller parts in Slovakia and Poland. On the right in this picture is the Church of the Ascension of Our Lord in Yasinya, built in 1824 and typical of the ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Yasinya. Wooden Church
This image is part of an album probably published in about 1920 that contains 20 photographs of scenes in Carpathian Ruthenia, a mountainous region, most of which was part of the Austria-Hungary before World War I, but which became part of the new Czechoslovak state in 1919. Today the largest portion of it forms Zakarpattia Oblast in western Ukraine, with smaller parts in Slovakia and Poland. Shown here is the Church of Saints Peter and Paul and its bell tower in the Plytovate area of Yasinya, across the Tisza River ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Saint-Cloud
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Saint-Cloud
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Town Hall of the 1st Arrondissement; Place Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Rue Rivoli; Corner of Place Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois
The Franco-Prussian War was brought about by rising tensions between France and Prussia in the 1860s. France, under Emperor Napoleon III, was determined to check the growth of Prussian power and avenge what it saw as a series of diplomatic humiliations. Prussia, under Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, believed that a Prussian-led war of the German states against France would be a decisive act leading to creation of a unified German empire. The conflict began on July 19, 1870, when France declared war. The French army proved woefully unprepared and suffered ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Nativity-St. Ferapont Monastery, Southwest View, Ferapontovo, Russia
This photograph of the main ensemble at the Ferapontov-Nativity of the Virgin Monastery was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the “Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located near the Sheksna River in the central part of Vologda Province, the Ferapontov-Nativity Monastery was founded in 1398 on the shores of Lake Borodava by Ferapont, a monk of noble birth from Moscow. The center of the monastery is the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin, built ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Savior (1706-10), Southwest View, Irkutsk, Russia
This photograph of the Church of the Miraculous Icon of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the time of its first log forts in the 1660s, Irkutsk was destined to be the administrative and commercial center of eastern Siberia. In 1700, Irkutsk became the third Siberian city capable of producing bricks on a large scale. In 1706-10, master ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Savior (1706-10), East View, Irkutsk, Russia
This photograph of the Church of the Miraculous Icon of the Savior (Spas Nerukotvornyi) in the city of Irkutsk was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. From the time of its first log forts in the 1660s, Irkutsk was destined to be the administrative and commercial center of eastern Siberia. In 1700, Irkutsk became the third Siberian city capable of producing bricks on a large scale. Shortly thereafter, in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Nativity of Christ (1552-62, 1652, 1770s), South Panorama from Onega River, with Bell Tower (1767-78), Kargopol', Russia
This south view, from the frozen Onega River, of the church ensemble on Cathedral (or New Market) Square in Kargopol' (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Kargopol' is one of the oldest settlements in the Russian north, founded perhaps in the 12th, or even the 11th, century. Its location near Lake Lacha and the origins of the Onega River (which flows into the White Sea ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cathedral Bell Tower (1767-78), East View, Kargopol', Russia
This northeast view of the cathedral bell tower in Kargopol' (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Kargopol' is one of the oldest settlements in the Russian north, founded perhaps in the 12th, or even the 11th, century. Its location near Lake Lacha and the origins of the Onega River (which flows into the White Sea) enabled Kargopol' to benefit from trade in salt, fish, and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Resurrection (1686-94), Southwest View, Matigory, Russia
This southwest view of the Church of the Resurrection in the village of Verkhnie Matigory (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Made of stuccoed brick with white ornamental details, the Church of the Resurrection was erected in 1686-94 on a bluff above the Matigorka River (a tributary of the Northern Dvina River) by the master builder Fëdor Spiridonov Stafurov. The picturesque arrangement of its volumes ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Hodigitria Icon of the Virgin (1763), Southwest View, Kimzha, Russia
This southwest winter view of the Church of the Hodigitria Icon of the Mother of God, in the village of Kimzha (Mezen'sky District, Arkhangel'sk Oblast), was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. The village of Kimzha arose in the early 16th century, on the right bank of the Kimzha River, a tributary of the Mezen' River, which flows into the White Sea. In 1699, a lightning strike ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Hodigitria Icon of the Virgin (1763), South View, Kimzha, Russia
This south view of the Church of the Hodigitria Icon of the Mother of God, in the village of Kimzha (Mezen'sky District, Arkhangel'sk Oblast), was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. The village of Kimzha arose in the early 16th century, on the right bank of the Kimzha River, a tributary of the Mezen' River, which flows into the White Sea. In 1699, a lightning strike and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Log Church of the Epiphany (1787), Northeast View with Bell Tower, Oshevensk, Russia
This northeast view of the log Church of the Epiphany at Oshevenskoe (Kargopol' District, Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Oshevenskoe, located along the right bank of the Chur'iuga River, developed near the Dormition Monastery, which was founded by the monk Alexander Osheven in 1453. This large village consisted of three hamlets, each with its own name. The Church of the Epiphany presided over ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of St. John Chrysostome (1665), Southwest View, Saunino, Russia
This southwest view of the log Church of Saint John Chrysostom (near Kargopol', Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. The Church of Saint John Chrysostom, whose basic structure dates from 1665, was built in a cemetery at the edge of the village of Saunino. Its noble form represents the best traditions of north Russian log architecture. The main part of the church is a cube ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Annuciation (1560-84), Southwest Panorama with Vychegda River, Sol'vychegodsk, Russia
This southwest view of the Cathedral of the Annunciation at Sol'vychegodsk (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1996 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located near the confluence of the Vychegda and Northern Dvina rivers, Sol’vychegodsk (Salt of the Vychegda) is in an area of many salt springs. In the 16th century it became the center of vast trading operations owned by the Stroganovs, whose wealth was based on salt ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Annunciation (1560-84), East View, Sol'vychegodsk, Russia
This east view of the Cathedral of the Annunciation at Sol'vychegodsk (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located near the confluence of the Vychegda and Northern Dvina rivers, Sol’vychegodsk (Salt of the Vychegda) is in an area of many salt springs. In the 16th century, Sol’vychegodsk became the center of vast trading operations owned by the Stroganovs, whose wealth was based on ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress