6 results
Storehouse for Cement. Kuzminskoe
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Dawson's Brewery, Northwest Corner of 10th and Filbert Streets, Philadelphia
This 1831 lithograph depicts Dawson's Brewery, located at the northwest corner of 10th and Filbert Streets in Philadelphia. Two men are seen loading barrels of beer onto a horse-drawn cart on the cobblestone street in front of the brewery. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Wetherill and Brothers White Lead Manufactory and Chemical Works, Corner of 12th and Cherry Streets, Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the Wetherill & Brothers White Lead Manufactory & Chemical Works, located at the corner of 12th and Cherry Streets in Philadelphia. Barrels, a horse-drawn cart, and a few workmen are seen in the courtyard of the U-shaped industrial complex, while dark smoke rises from several chimneys. White lead is a chemical compound made up of lead, carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen, historically used to make white paint. It was an important industrial product in 19th-century America, later banned for use in paint in the United States and most other countries as a cause of lead poisoning. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an account of its origin, increase and improvements in arts, sciences, manufactures, commerce and revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Charles Egner Wine and Liquor Store, 10 North Third Street, Philadelphia
This lithographed advertisement shows the busy four-story storefront for Charles Egner Wine & Liquor Store. Two gentleman converse near a row of stacked barrels within the store and two workers hoist a barrel at the second entranceway. In front of the open cellar to the building, an employee rolls one of several barrels lined on the sidewalk. To the left of the worker, three barrels stand upright and a gentleman approaches. The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia about 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced the first commercial lithographs in Philadelphia. This advertisement was printed in about 1837 by the partnership of Lehman & Duval.
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Newmarket Hardware, Cutlery and Nail Store
This 1846 print is an advertisement for the Newmarket Hardware, Cutlery and Nail Store in Philadelphia. Owned by Baxter & Brother, the store was  located at 244 South Second Street, later renumbered to 522 South Second Street following the consolidation of the city in 1854. Merchandise adorns the display windows of the shop and a clerk assisting a customer is visible through the doorway. A sign for "looking glasses," i.e., mirrors, and two teapots and an anvil hang above the open entrance door. In front of the store, crates, barrels ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Porteus' Works. Pine Oil Camphine Distilled by Steam. Number 581, North Front Street. Philadelphia
This advertisement for the J.A. Porteus Chemical Works in Philadelphia depicts aspects of industry in mid-19th century America. The illustration at the top shows a view of the works, located at 581 North Front Street. Laborers load a horse-drawn wagon and a dray with barrels that are lined along the building. A couple walks past the factory, which is comprised of gable-roofed brick buildings of various heights. The illustration below is a cross-section view of an enormous distilling machine used in making the firm’s products, which included turpentine ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia