18 results in English
Storehouse for Cement. Kuzminskoe
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Dawson's Brewery, Northwest Corner of 10th and Filbert Streets, Philadelphia
This 1831 lithograph depicts Dawson's Brewery, located at the northwest corner of 10th and Filbert Streets in Philadelphia. Two men are seen loading barrels of beer onto a horse-drawn cart on the cobblestone street in front of the brewery. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia ...
Wetherill and Brothers White Lead Manufactory and Chemical Works, Corner of 12th and Cherry Streets, Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the Wetherill & Brothers White Lead Manufactory & Chemical Works, located at the corner of 12th and Cherry Streets in Philadelphia. Barrels, a horse-drawn cart, and a few workmen are seen in the courtyard of the U-shaped industrial complex, while dark smoke rises from several chimneys. White lead is a chemical compound made up of lead, carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen, historically used to make white paint. It was an important industrial product in 19th-century America, later banned for use in paint in the United States and most other countries as a cause of lead poisoning. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an account of its origin, increase and improvements in arts, sciences, manufactures, commerce and revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
Charles Egner Wine and Liquor Store, 10 North Third Street, Philadelphia
This lithographed advertisement shows the busy four-story storefront for Charles Egner Wine & Liquor Store. Two gentleman converse near a row of stacked barrels within the store and two workers hoist a barrel at the second entranceway. In front of the open cellar to the building, an employee rolls one of several barrels lined on the sidewalk. To the left of the worker, three barrels stand upright and a gentleman approaches. The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia about 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced the first commercial lithographs in Philadelphia. This advertisement was printed in about 1837 by the partnership of Lehman & Duval.
John Hibler, Importer and Wholesale Dealer in Foreign and American Wines and Liquors. Number 56, North Third Street (Second Door above Arch Street), Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1844 depicts the four-story shop of John Hibler located at 56 North Third Street (the second door north of Arch Street), Philadelphia. The shop displays signage advertising wines and liquors. The doors, windows, and cellar are open for business. Inside the shop, wine casks, crates, jugs, and bottles line the floors and a laborer raises a cask with a pulley. Outside, a laborer loads casks onto a horse-drawn cart. An African American peddler with a basket passes by, ringing a bell. Partial views of the adjacent ...
Conrad & Roberts Hardware & Cutlery, 123 North Third Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the Conrad & Roberts Hardware & Cutlery store on the 200 block of North Third Street. It shows the storefront adorned with signage. The store interior is visible through the two open entrances. A clerk retrieves merchandise from a shelf for a patron and another serves a gentleman at a counter. Laborers move barrels and boxes from the open cellar. Above the cellar ...
S. Tobias, Importer & General Dealer in Wines, Liquors, Cordials and Syrups, Number 68, North Third Street, above Arch, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. His advertisement here shows the Tobias storefront adorned with signage on the 100 block of North Third Street. A patron enters one of the two open entryways at which a straw basket and wine cask are displayed across from a large cask-shaped sign, which reads "S. Tobias No. 68 Importer & Dealer in Wines Liquors Cordials and Syrups." At the other entryway, a laborer rolls a cask out ...
Newmarket Hardware, Cutlery and Nail Store
This 1846 print is an advertisement for the Newmarket Hardware, Cutlery and Nail Store in Philadelphia. Owned by Baxter & Brother, the store was  located at 244 South Second Street, later renumbered to 522 South Second Street following the consolidation of the city in 1854. Merchandise adorns the display windows of the shop and a clerk assisting a customer is visible through the doorway. A sign for "looking glasses," i.e., mirrors, and two teapots and an anvil hang above the open entrance door. In front of the store, crates, barrels ...
Lockwood and Smith, Importers and Dealers China, Glass and Queensware, 7 South Fourth Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is his advertisement for the Lockwood & Smith business at 7 South Fourth Street between Market and Chestnut Streets. A clerk greets a male patron at one of the open entryways. Shelves of plates, bowls, and pitchers line the walls of the store. In the display windows, more china, glass, and queensware (cream-colored earthenware), including tureens and pitchers, are on view. On the sidewalk, clerks handle ...
Robert Shoemaker's Wholesale and Retail Drugstore, Southwest Corner of Second and Green Streets, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. Shown here is Shoemaker’s drugstore on the 200 block of Green Street. Signs advertise Wetherill's white lead, drugs, medicines, paints, oils, glass, dyestuffs, "window glass of all sizes," picture glass, "cheap glass for hot beds," "white lead warranted pure by the ton or pound," ready-mixed paints, linseed oil, plasters, potash, and soda. A patron enters past barrels and sacks. Two clerks stand at the long ...
T. Wattson and Sons, Biscuit Bakery, 129 North Front Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy four-story factory for the bakery at 129 North Front Street, between Chestnut and Walnut Streets. A gentleman, possibly the proprietor Thomas Wattson, stands in one of the open doorways to the bakery as laborers work around him. Near the doorways, workers load kegs onto a horse-drawn "T. Wattson & Sons Biscuit Bakery" wagon and dray. Other men hoist kegs to the upper receiving ...
J. and J. Reakirt, Wholesale Drug Warehouse: Drugs, Chemicals, Paints, and Dye-Stuffs. Southeastern Corner of Third and Callowhill Streets, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1846 shows the three-and-one-half story building of J. & J. Reakirt, wholesale druggists located in the 200 block of Callowhill Street in Philadelphia. Signs advertise "Drugs, Chemicals, Paints, Oils, Glass, and Dye-Stuffs"; "White-Lead & Window-Glass at Manufacturers Lowest Prices"; “Paints, Oils, Varnishes”; and "Alum, Madder, Logwood, Camwood, Indigo, Copperas, Fustic, Turpentine." Patrons, visible through the open doorways, stand at counters within the storefront. Jars and decanters line the display windows. Crates and barrels, some marked, line the sidewalk. At the side of the store, a clerk checks a list as a drayman unloads his horse-drawn vehicle. A large-scale mortar and pestle of an apothecary hangs from the corner of the building, and a fire ...
John Ziegler, Grocer. Northwest Corner of Callowhill and Water Streets, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1847 shows the grocery shop operated by John Ziegler at the northwest corner of Callowhill and Water Streets in Philadelphia. A large sign on one side of the building reads “Groceries & Provisions. Sea Stores.” Sea stores were supplies acquired and stored before starting on a sea voyage, and would have been in great demand in a busy port such as Philadelphia. Workers, clerks, customers, and possibly the proprietor himself are seen on the sidewalk, the street, or inside the building. The print is by William H ...
P. Maison's Biscuit Bakery, 134 North Front Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy three-story bakery at 134 (later 214) North Front Street. Banners attached to the building swing out to awning posts to proclaim "P. Maison's Bakery 134." Another "Bakery" sign extends over the adjacent alley between the business and the neighboring building. A gentleman, possibly the proprietor, stands at the entrance of the building as laborers transport and stack barrels at the open ...
Patent Improved Lead Pipe Sheet Lead and Composition Gas Tubes, Manufactured by Tatham & Brothers, Office 15 Minor Street, Philadelphia, and 249 Water Street, New York
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the factory complex at 608 Delaware Avenue (occupied in 1844) for the lead pipe factory established in Philadelphia in 1841 by George N., Henry B., and William P. Tatham. The business office was in Minor Street. Employees work in front of the industrial factory building that is covered with signage and at its wharf. Men lift a barrel with a hoist, guide horse-drawn drays ...
Porteus' Works. Pine Oil Camphine Distilled by Steam. Number 581, North Front Street. Philadelphia
This advertisement for the J.A. Porteus Chemical Works in Philadelphia depicts aspects of industry in mid-19th century America. The illustration at the top shows a view of the works, located at 581 North Front Street. Laborers load a horse-drawn wagon and a dray with barrels that are lined along the building. A couple walks past the factory, which is comprised of gable-roofed brick buildings of various heights. The illustration below is a cross-section view of an enormous distilling machine used in making the firm’s products, which included turpentine ...
Issac Koons Sugar Refinery and Rock Candy Manufactory
This advertisement from 1847 shows a three-story office building (with an addition), and the attached nine-story sugar refinery, located at the southwest corner of Willow Street and Old York Road (York Avenue), in Philadelphia. The signs on the office building identify this business as a sugar refinery and rock candy manufactory owned by Isaac Koons. A stout clerk stands in the doorway of the office. A horse-drawn dray loaded with goods (some labeled “K”) rests in the street and the drayman walks toward the clerk. A barrel stands next to ...
B. Lieber, Importer of Brandies, Wines, Gins, Brown-Stout, Scotch Ale, Absinthe, Cigars, Et cetera. Manufacturer of Punch Essence, Cordials, Lemon Syrup, Raspberry, Lavender, Rose, Blackberry and Wild-Cherry. Brandies, Bitters, Et cetera. Number 121 North Fourth Street, Philadelphia
This advertising print from 1849 shows the four-story storefront of the establishment of B. Lieber, liquor importer, located on the 300 block of North Fourth Street (between Vine and Callowhill streets) in Philadelphia. Bottles, small boxes, and broadside advertisements, predominantly for French cordials and bitters, fill the display window, and a large model cask with advertising text and stacks of labeled boxes flank the open entrance. Box labels include "Ysla de Cuba," "Assorted Cordials," "Glorias," and "Habano." A clerk confers with a patron within the store, seen through the entryway ...