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Painting 111
Manolo Millares was a self-taught artist born in 1926 in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, in the Canary Islands archipelago of Spain. Shown here is his Cuadro 111 (Painting 111), made some time after 1960, an abstract work in startlingly vivid tones of green, purple and black. Millares was influenced by Surrealism from the late 1940s and attracted to the works of Klee and Miró. In that period, he began making abstract pictograms inspired by the Guanches, the indigenous Canaries people, and the pre-Hispanic culture of the islands, and he was ...
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Cabildo of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands
Zenith: International Review of Arts and Culture, Number 1, February 1921
Zenit (Zenith) was the most important avant-garde magazine published in the former Yugoslavia and one of the most significant publications of the broader European avant-garde movement of the early 20th century. It was launched in February 1921 by the artist Ljubomir Micić (1895-1971) and published monthly in Zagreb and Belgrade until December 1926, when it was banned by the authorities. A total of 43 issues were published, as well as one poster, “Zenitismus,” and one issue of a daily Zenit newspaper dated September 23, 1922. “Zenitism” was an avant-garde movement ...
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National Library of Serbia
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One Must Work, the Rifle Is Right Here
This propaganda poster from the Russian Civil War of 1919–21 is by Vladimir Lebedev, a prolific Russian painter, book illustrator, and poster and set designer. Lebedev’s compositions are distinguished by simple blocks of color and figures broken down into geometric shapes. This poster depicts a worker holding a saw with a rifle nearby, thus conveying, with minimal line and color, the image of a worker also ready to fight. During the Civil War, the Russian Telegraph Agency (ROSTA) produced many posters that were used to communicate government messages ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Cutting Iron
This propaganda poster from the Russian Civil War of 1919–21 is by Vladimir Lebedev, a prolific Russian painter, book illustrator, and poster and set designer. Lebedev’s compositions are distinguished by simple blocks of color and figures broken down into geometric shapes. The image here depicts a worker manually cutting a sheet of iron. With minimal lines, details, and colors the artist creates a distinct and positive image of a factory worker, the iron easily yielding to his strength. During the Civil War, the Russian Telegraph Agency (ROSTA) produced ...
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National Library of Russia
The Union of Worker and Peasant
This propaganda poster from the Russian Civil War of 1919–21 is by Vladimir Lebedev, a prolific Russian painter, book illustrator, and poster and set designer. Lebedev’s compositions are distinguished by simple blocks of color and figures broken down into geometric shapes. The image here promotes the brotherhood of peasants and workers and may have addressed a topical issue at a time when workers lost jobs and fled to the country leading to tensions between these two groups. In this composition, the worker stands slightly behind and in friendly ...
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National Library of Russia
The Austrians Surrendered Lvov to the Russians, Like Rabbits Defeated by Lions
This World War I propaganda poster, created by Aristarkh Lentulov (1882–1943), depicts Austrian soldiers defeated by the Russian army in September 1914 fleeing from the city of Lvov (present-day L’viv, Ukraine). The Russian horsemen, long spears raised, charge the enemy as the Austrians panic and run away. Lvov is depicted in the center of the picture with simple geometrical shapes and strong colors. In the early stages of the war, a number of Russian avant-garde artists, including Lentulov, Vladimir Mayakovsky, and Kazimir Malevich, formed the group Segodnyashnii Lubok ...
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National Library of Russia
For the Voice
For the Voice, a collection of poems by Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893–1930), was published in Berlin in 1923 in collaboration with the artist Lazar Lisitskii (better known as El Lisitski, 1890–1941). The poems were meant to be read aloud and reflected themes favored by Mayakovsky in the period after the Russian Revolution of 1917: anger with the idle and satiated bourgeoisie, compassion for the struggle of the common people, and the call for an “army of the arts” to help fight the struggle against the old order. The book ...
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National Library of Russia
The Austrians Cursed Loudly near the Carpathian Mountains
This World War I propaganda poster, created by Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893–1930), depicts Austrian soldiers retreating from the 1914 Russian invasion of Galicia, near the Carpathian Mountains. The terrified Austrians are pursued by the victorious Russian cavalry. With limited colors and basic contour drawing the artist achieves a simple and comical picture. The strength of the Russians is emphasized by a long file of mounted soldiers, their commander boldly charging the enemy and brandishing his saber. In the early stages of the war, a number of Russian avant-garde artists, including ...
Contributed by
National Library of Russia
Wilhelm's Merry-Go-Round: "Outside of Paris My Army Is Being Defeated…"
This World War I propaganda poster, designed by Kazimir Malevich (1878–1935), depicts the German army defeated by the Allies on the outskirts of Paris in the fall of 1914. On the right, German soldiers are seen dying under a barrage of artillery. Gunfire belches from behind the city walls of Paris, visible in the top-left corner. In the center the figure of Kaiser Wilhelm II helplessly observes the collapse of the German offensive. The verse under the picture by Vladimir Mayakovsky reads: “Outside of Paris my army is being ...
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National Library of Russia
What Crackle, What Thunder
This World War I propaganda poster by Kazimir Malevich refers to a battle near Lomza (present-day Poland), where despite initial success, the Russians suffered heavy losses. A heroic Russian peasant figure slashing German soldiers with his scythe dominates the view. His traditional dress and lapti (woven bark shoes) seem to epitomize Russia’s strength and invincibility. German soldiers are running away or lie dead. Under the picture is a verse by Vladimir Mayakovsky that reads: “What crackle, what thunder there was from the Germans at Lomza!” In the early stages ...
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National Library of Russia
A Sausage Maker Came to Lodz. We Said to Him: "Welcome, Sir!...”
This World War I propaganda poster, by Kazimir Malevich in collaboration with Vladimir Mayakovsky, depicts a Russian peasant and the German Army he is portrayed as having defeated. The oversized peasant on the left panel is greeting the German emperor, who moves towards him with his army of cheerful soldiers, confident of victory. On the right side, the peasant walks away after having crushed the enemy. With his army destroyed, the emperor is dismayed. The verse by Mayakovsky below the images reads: “A sausage maker came to Lodz. We said ...
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National Library of Russia
The French Allies Have a Cart Filled with Captured Germans
This World War I propaganda poster, designed by the Russian artist Kazimir Malevich (1878–1935) in collaboration with fellow artist Vladimir Mayakovsky, depicts French and British soldiers carrying off captured German soldiers in a cart and a tub. The rhyming couplets at the bottom by Mayakovsky read: “The French Allies have a cart filled with captured Germans, and our British brothers have а whole tub of them.” In the early stages of the war, a number of Russian avant-garde artists, including Malevich, Mayakovsky, and Aristarkh Lentulov, formed the group Segodnyashnii ...
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National Library of Russia