4 results in English
Panorama of Florence, 1557
This panoramic view of Florence in 1557 is from the collection of cityscapes and broadsheets that once belonged to the Swedish statesman Count Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie (1622−86). ‏On the left side of the engraving is the coat of arms of the Medici family; on the right, the coat of arms of the city of Florence. The Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie collection consists of 187 engravings from the late 1500s and early 1600s. The prints originally were bound, ordered, and assigned a number. The early provenance of ...
The Doge’s Procession Crossing Saint Mark’s Square, Venice
This view of the procession of the doge in Saint Mark’s Square in Venice is from the collection of cityscapes and broadsheets that once belonged to the Swedish statesman Count Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie (1622−86). ‏The procession of the doge through the square to the Bucentaur, the state galley, was observed annually on Ascension Day up to 1798 to consecrate the symbolic betrothal of the city with the sea. The print is by Jost Amman (circa 1539−91), a noted Swiss engraver and prolific book illustrator. The ...
Hôtel de Ville, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Hôtel de Ville, or Paris city hall, is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The building depicted is the reconstructed version of the original Hôtel de Ville, which was built in 1533 and destroyed in 1871 during the upheavals of the Paris Commune. The reconstruction, undertaken by the French architects Theodore Ballu (1817–85) and Edouard Deperthes (1833–98), took place between 1876 and 1884 and resulted in an enlarged and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Bridge of Sighs, Venice, Italy
This photochrome print of the Bridge of Sighs (Ponte dei Sospiri) in Venice is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Made of white limestone and containing two stone-barred windows, the 11-meter-wide bridge was built in 1595–1600 by Antonio Contino (1566–1600). Greatly admired for its decorative Italian Renaissance architecture, the bridge connects the interrogation rooms and prison in the Palazzo Ducale with a newer prison, the Palazzo delle Prigioni, located across the Rio di Palazzo. The ...
Contributed by Library of Congress