Narrow results:

Place

Time Period

Topic

Additional Subjects

Type of Item

Language

Institution

22 results
Saviour Church, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome print from circa 1890-1900 is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows Our Savior’s Church (Vor Frelsers Kirke), a large baroque church in the Christianshavn district of the city, that was built in 1682-96. The church was constructed in a Palladian-Netherlandic style for King Christian V by the court builder, Lambert van Haven (1630-95). Lauritz de Thurah (1706-59) designed the spire, which was completed in 1752, more than 50 years after the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cathedral of St. Prokopii of Ustiug (1668, 1720), East View, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This east view of the Cathedral of Saint Prokopii of Ustiug at Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Ustiug played a critical role not only in northern trade, but also in the missionary activity of prelates such as the 14th-century Saint Stefan of Perm. This church is the second major component of the Cathedral of the Dormition of the Virgin ensemble. Saint Prokopii was ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Presentation of the Virgin (1688-93), Southwest View, Sol'vychegodsk, Russia
This southwest view of the Cathedral of the Presentation of the Virgin in Sol'vychegodsk (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1999 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. This spectacular church was built for the Presentation Monastery, founded in 1565 by the Stroganov family as part of their trading compound at Sol’vychegodsk. Construction began in 1688, with the support of Grigorii Stroganov, soon to become prominent in the reign of Peter ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Presentation of the Virgin (1688-93), Southwest View, Sol'vychegodsk, Russia
This southwest winter view of the Cathedral of the Presentation of the Virgin in Sol'vychegodsk (Arkhangel'sk Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. This spectacular church was built for the Presentation Monastery, founded in 1565 by the Stroganov family as part of their trading compound at Sol’vychegodsk. Construction began in 1688, with the support of Grigorii Stroganov, soon to become prominent in the reign of ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Dormition Cathedral (1652-63, 1728-32), North View, Velikii Ustiug, Russia
This north view of the Cathedral of the Dormition of the Virgin and the adjacent bell tower at Velikii Ustiug (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located where the Sukhona and Iug rivers merge to form the Northern Dvina River, the town became a major transportation route to the north and east as early as the 12th century. Ustiug played a critical role in north Russia ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
St. Cyril (Kirill)-Belozersk Monastery, Holy Gates (1523), with Church of St. John Climacus (1572), South View, Kirillov, Russia
This south view of the Gate Church of Saint John Climacus at Saint Kirill Belozersk Monastery (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 1993 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Formally dedicated to the Dormition of the Virgin, the monastery was founded in 1397 by Kirill (1337-1427), a Muscovite monk canonized in 1547. The monastery soon acquired significance as a major religious center with connections to the Muscovite court and as a fortress on ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Purification (1731-35), Southwest View, with Vologda River in Winter, Vologda, Russia
This southwest view of the Church of the Purification of the Virgin across the frozen Vologda River was taken in 1997 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the most important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century. A rich center of medieval Russian ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
La Grande Place, the Old Houses, Brussels, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Grande Place in Brussels is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). This square is the traditional center of Brussels, the location of city hall and the city’s market place. Its present appearance has not changed since around 1695, when the French army under Louis XIV destroyed its older structures, which had been built in the Middle Ages. The houses shown here reflect a Gothic–Baroque style of architecture, popular in the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Maison du France, Bruges, Belgium
This photochrome print of the Maison du Franc in Bruges is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Maison du Franc, also known as Landhuis van het Brugse Vrije (Palace of the Liberty of Bruges) was built in the 1720s, on the basis of the designs of the architect Jan van der Cruycen, and stands at the center of Bruges on the site of an older, 16th-century building. The structure, whose architecture reflects classical and baroque elements ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Design Statement for the Royal Palace of Caserta to their Holy Royal Majesties Carlo, King of the Two Sicilies and of Jerusalem. Infante of Spain, Duke of Parma and of Piacenza, Great Hereditary Prince of Tuscany and of Queen Maria Amalia of Saxony
Luigi Vanvitelli (1700–73) was an Italian architect and engineer, the son of Flemish-born painter Caspar van Wittel. Vanvitelli trained in Rome under the architect Niccolo Salvi, and designed churches and other structures in Rome, and in Ancona, in east-central Italy. He received a commission in 1751 to build a new royal palace at Caserta, just north of Naples for Charles VII, the Bourbon king of Naples and Sicily. Construction of this magnificent building began in 1752. It was one of the largest buildings erected in Europe in the 18th ...
Contributed by
University Library of Naples
The Dome des Invalides, Paris, France
This photochrome print of Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Dôme des Invalides comprises a section of the Eglise Saint-Louis des Invalides (Church of Les Invalides), which contains the tomb of Emperor Napoleon I. Les Invalides, which occupies about 12 hectares of land, was founded by Louis XIV in 1670. It was designed by Libéral Bruant (circa 1635–97) in the classical French architectural style as a facility to provide elderly, injured, or ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Winter Palace Place and Alexander's Column, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the Winter Palace and Alexander’s Column in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Winter Palace was built between 1754 and 1762 for Empress Elizabeth, the daughter of Peter the Great (1672-1725), and served as the residence of the Russian tsars from the 1760s until the revolution of 1917. The Baroque-style building measures more than 17,000 square meters and is distinguished by its ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church of the Annunciation, Interior, Genoa, Italy
This photochrome print of the nave of the Church of the Annunciation (Chiesa dell’Annunciazione) in Genoa is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Church of the Annunciation, or the Basilica della Santissima Annunziata del Vastato, is widely considered the most beautiful church in Genoa. Construction was begun by Franciscan monks in 1520. In 1591, a prominent Genoese family, the Lomellinis, undertook an expansion and renovation of the church. The family commissioned the Italian painter Giovanni ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Fountain of Trevi, Rome, Italy
This photochrome print of the Trevi Fountain (Fontana di Trevi) is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Italy” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The fountain, 26 meters long by 20 meters wide, stands against the south side of the Palazzo Poli, a Baroque palace that was altered by Luigi Vanvitelli (1700–73) to accommodate the fountain and serve as its backdrop. The fountain dates back to ancient Rome, when this location was the terminal point for the Aqua Virgo aqueduct, which was commissioned ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cathedral of St. Sophia (1568-70), with Belltower (1869-70), Southeast View, Vologda, Russia
This photograph of the Cathedral of Saint Sophia in Vologda was taken in 1998 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Before the founding of St. Petersburg in 1703, Russia depended on a northern route through the White Sea for trade with western Europe. One of the most important centers on this route was Vologda, founded in the 12th century. The significance of Vologda increased during the reign of Ivan IV (the Terrible ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
View from the Dnieper River to Saint Andrew’s Mountains
This view of the Dnieper River is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. Seen in the foreground is the paddle steamer Ratmir. Above the cultivated slopes of the Apothecary Garden is Saint Andrew’s Church, which sits on the spot where Andrew is said to have erected his cross. The baroque church, completed in 1754, was designed by the Italian-born architect Bartolomeo Rastrelli (circa ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
General View of Kiev-Pechersk Lavra
This view of Kiev-Pechersk Lavra is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. Kiev-Pechersk Lavra, also called the Monastery of the Kiev Caves (pechera means cave; lavra indicates a monastery of status), is a large complex founded in 1051 by a monk named Anthony in caves dug out of the hillside. The monastery soon became the center of Christianity in Russia and played an important ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
View of the Old City of Kiev
This view of the old city of Kiev is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. Vladimir Hill, one of the oldest places in Kiev, is part of the public Saint Michael’s Park in front of Saint Michael’s Monastery, laid out after a monument to Prince Vladimir the Great was built there in 1853. The classical Saint Alexander’s Church, built in 1842 ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Assumption Cathedral
This view of Assumption Cathedral is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. Also known as the Cathedral of the Dormition, Assumption Cathedral is a major building within the large monastery complex of the Kiev-Pechersk Lavra. It was originally built in the 1070s by Prince Sviatoslav Jaroslavovich but was repeatedly destroyed and rebuilt. After a fire in 1718, extensive redesign resulted in the building in ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Saint Michael’s Monastery
This view of Saint Michael’s Monastery is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. The monastery was founded in the late 11th century and dedicated to the Archangel Michael, who later was adopted as the city’s patron saint. The cathedral of the monastery was originally constructed in the early 12th century, and its domes were probably the first in Kiev to be gilded ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Tsar's Palace
This view of the Tsar’s Palace (often called the Mariyinsky Palace) in Kiev is from Souvenir of Kiev, an early 20th-century album showing the main sites of Kiev, the capital of Ukraine and at that time one of the most important cities of the Russian Empire. The site of the palace was chosen by the Empress Elizabeth in 1744 to serve as the royal residence in the south of the Russian Empire and to echo the grandeur of Versailles. Moscow architect Ivan Michurin constructed the palace from initial designs ...
Contributed by
National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine