6 results
Church at an Almshouse. Leushino, Russian Empire
A major component of the Mariinsk Waterway System (now called the Volga-Baltic Waterway), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 km, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. Resevoirs created in the mid-20th century submerged much of the land along the river. A notable lost landmark was the John the Baptist Convent at the village of Leushino, located ...
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Library of Congress
View of the Philadelphia Alms House: Blockley
This 1835 lithograph by George Lehman shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from Hyde Park on the east bank of the Schuylkill River. The view shows the riverbanks where two men fish and cows graze. A two-masted sailing ship passes by, with other ships on the river and the sprawling city stretched out in the background. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
U.S. Naval Asylum
The main building of the U.S. Naval Asylum (Biddle Hall) was designed by William Strickland (1787–1854) in 1826 and completed in 1833. Strickland was one of the first architects of the Greek Revival style in the United States and also a civil engineer. The columns on the asylum’s balconies were an innovative use of cast-iron as a building material. The U.S. Navy commissioned the building to house officers and seamen who had been disabled on duty as well as elderly and impoverished naval personnel. This print ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Friends' Alms-House
This print shows an exterior view of the front of the almshouse located on the south side of Walnut Street between 3rd and 4th Streets, Philadelphia. The building was constructed in 1745 by the Religious Society of Friends, the Protestant religious sect known as the Quakers, and it was taken down in 1841. It was intended to house destitute members of the Society of Friends and also sometimes admitted poverty-stricken people of other denominations. The print is by Thomas S. Sinclair (circa 1805–81), who was born in the Orkney ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Alms House. Philadelphia
This 1840s print shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from the east bank of the Schuylkill River. It includes the Market Street Bridge, Beck’s shot tower (a city landmark since 1808) and, in the far distance, the Eastern State Penitentiary. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was constructed in the early 1730s and was the first multifunctional government-sponsored institution for the care ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Panorama of Philadelphia from the State House Steeple. West
This print is a panoramic view of Philadelphia as seen looking west toward West Philadelphia past the Schuylkill River. It mainly shows the area of the city between Arch Street and Gray's Ferry Avenue. Printed below the image is a partial key to eight of 15 (1-4, 8-12) landmarks visible in the print: (1) U.S. Naval Asylum; (2) [Blockley] Alms House; (3) Peale's Museum; (4) Walnut Street Theatre; (5) Cook's Circus, i.e., Thomas Cooke's equestrian circus; (6) Saint John's Church, i.e., Saint ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia