14 results in English
Syr Darya Oblast. Village of Ikan
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
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Tenants on Ranch
This photograph, taken in Chile, some time in the first quarter of the 20th century, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and ...
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Nazar Magomet. Golodnaia Steppe
Among the primary initiators of Russian development projects in Turkestan was Grand Duke Nicholas Konstantinovich (1850–1918), grandson of Tsar Nicholas I, who in 1881 moved to Tashkent. There he sponsored a number of ventures, including a vast irrigation scheme to make Golodnaia Steppe (“Hungry Steppe,” present-day Uzbekistan) a productive area for raising cotton and wheat. This photograph shows a local inhabitant, Nazar Magomet, on horseback near a simple settler’s hut in the grasslands. The hut is of adobe brick surfaced with mud, while the roof consists of log ...
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Adobe Buildings and Yurts, Field in Foreground, Trees in Background
Shown here are new structures of adobe brick within an oasis grove at the Tekin settlement, located near the town of Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan), not far from the ruins of the ancient city of Merv. To the right is a group of mounds that appear to be dwellings, as well as the ruined walls of an old adobe structure. The earth in the foreground is parched, but fertile when irrigated. The nearby town of Bayramaly, in Mary Province on the railroad from Ashgabat to Tashkent, was known in the Russian ...
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Adobe Buildings in Desert Plains
Shown here are ruins of the fabled city of Merv, situated on the Murghab River in the Mary region of present-day Turkmenistan. Settled as early as the third millennium BC, Merv was taken by the Arabs in 651 and became a staging point for Arab conquests in Central Asia. Merv reached its zenith under the Seljuks in the late 11th and 12th centuries, when it was one of the world’s largest cities and a major stop along the Silk Road. Destroyed by the Mongols in 1221, Merv never regained ...
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View of a Courtyard, Adobe Buildings, and a Bird's Nest Atop a Dome
Cotton was an essential raw material for the large textile mills of the Russian Empire, which underwent rapid industrialization in the late 19th-early 20th century. Russian authorities made concerted efforts to find sufficiently warm areas in the empire for the cultivation of this crop. This photograph shows machines and vats for the production of cottonseed oil at the estate of Murgab near Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan). The Murgab Oasis and the city of Merv (now Mary) were incorporated into the Russian Empire through negotiations in 1884. The oasis takes its name ...
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Adobe Buildings and Burial Mounds in Desert Area
This view shows the Tekin Cemetery near the town of Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan).The earthen mounds, which often were reinforced with brick, are burial plots typical of Central Asia. Some of the mounds still have poles that were used as grave markers. Visible on the left are adobe walls that enclose special burial grounds. Bayramaly, situated in Mary Province on the railroad from Ashgabat to Tashkent, is known as a dry spa with a favorable climate. Nearby are the remains of the ancient city of Merv. The image is by ...
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Domed Adobe Structures Surrounded by an Adobe Wall
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Adobe Building in a Grassy Field, Trees in Background
Seen here is an irrigated wheat field, with an abandoned adobe brick dwelling of traditional but recent construction in the background. The roof is supported with embedded log beams, whose ends protrude from the masonry. The trees in the background indicate an oasis settlement, probably of the Teke ethnic group near the town of Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan). Bayramaly is located in the Province of Mary (successor to the fabled city of Merv) on the railroad from Ashgabat to Tashkent. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944 ...
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Adobe Buildings in Desert Plains
Shown here are a cotton field and adobe buildings on the estate of Grand Duke Nicholas Konstantinovich (1850–1918), grandson of Tsar Nicholas I, in Golodnaia Steppe (Hungry Steppe), located in present-day Uzbekistan. Exiled from Saint Petersburg in 1874 because of a family scandal, Nicholas settled in 1881 in Tashkent. There he sponsored a number of philanthropic and entrepreneurial projects. Among the latter was a vast irrigation scheme intended to provide arable land to Russian settlers and make Golodnaia Steppe a productive area for raising cotton and wheat. The image ...
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Domed Adobe Buildings with Several People Standing Nearby, Part of Crumbling Mosque Visible in Background, on Right
Shown here is a group of small adobe shrines at the mazar (mausoleum) of Ahmed Zamcha, located among the ruins of the fabled city of Merv (on the Murghab River in the Mary region of Turkmenistan). Settled in the third millennium BC, Merv reached its zenith under the Seljuks in the late 11th and 12th centuries, when it was one of the world’s largest cities and a major point on the Silk Road. Destroyed by the Mongols in 1221, Merv never regained its former importance. The figure at left ...
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Domed Adobe Buildings with Crumbling Mosque in Background
Shown here is a group of small adobe shrines at the mazar (mausoleum) of Ahmed Zamcha, located among the ruins of the fabled city of Merv (on the Murghab River in the Mary region of Turkmenistan). Settled in the third millennium BC, Merv was taken by the Arabs in 651 and became a staging point for Arab conquests in Central Asia. Merv reached its zenith under the Seljuks in the late 1lth and 12th centuries, when it was one of the world’s largest cities and a major point on ...
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Adobe Buildings, One with Dome
Shown here is the mazar (mausoleum) of Akhmed Zamcha, located among the ruins of the fabled city of Merv on the Murghab River in the Mary region of present-day Turkmenistan. Settled in the third millennium BC, Merv was taken by the Arabs in 651 and became a staging point for Arab conquests in Central Asia. Merv reached its zenith under the Seljuks in the late 11th and 12th centuries, when it was one of the world’s largest cities and a major stop along the Silk Road. Destroyed by the ...
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Adobe Buildings along a Vegetated Stream
This remarkable photograph shows adobe houses and the high walls of courtyards along the Siab (“black water”) River, on the northern outskirts of Samarkand. Low walls line the road on the right. Poplar trees are grouped along the riverbank and the horizon. The Siab River also runs near the ancient settlement of Afrasiab, which existed at least 2,500 years ago. Archeological excavations have found a number of valuable artifacts, indicating a high level of culture and prosperity. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who ...
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