Description

  • This poster, designed by the graphic artist Maurice Louis Henri Neumont (1868–1930)  and produced in Paris in 1914 by Maison d’édition, depicts Kaiser Wilhelm II, emperor of Germany during World War I, and his father, Kaiser Wilhelm I, who left the throne to his son when he died in 1888, as “murderers.” Each carries a knife, and behind them is a looming image of the imperial eagle of Germany, dripping blood. The papers on the ground show the international agreements and principles of international law that the German emperors were said to have trampled upon in their march toward war: respect for neutral countries, neutrality, the rights of man, the Hague peace congress, and so forth. The note at the lower left indicates that the print is the first in a series called “1914.” The series, produced during the war, was about the “atrocities of the barbarians against the peoples courageously struggling for the sacred cause of law, civilization, and liberty.” As part of its mobilization for war, France rallied its citizens by portraying the German emperors as murderers whose policies had caused the war. Neumont, a lithographer and painter, was a member of the patriotic school of French artists, who created pro-French propaganda posters during World War I.

Artist

Date Created

Publication Information

  • Maison d'Edition, Paris

Language

Title in Original Language

  • 1914! Les Assassins!

Place

Time Period

Topic

Additional Subjects

Type of Item

Physical Description

  • 1 print (poster) : lithograph ; 49 x 32 centimeters

Collection

Institution

References

  • Catherine Saint-Martin, Dico Solo en coleurs:  Plus de 5000 dessinateurs de presse & 600 supports en France de Daumier à l’an 2000 (Vichy: AEDIS, 2004).